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Model: LC-32LB150U SKU: 8976061

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With support for 1080p resolution, a 2,000,000:1 dynamic contrast ratio and direct-lit LED backlighting, this Sharp LC-32LB150U HDTV offers bright, arresting images in high-definition. VESA 100mm x 100mm compliance facilitates wall mounting.
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Model: RF-G1169 SKU: 2634942

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Enjoy stunning visuals on your HDTV or projector with this HDMI cable that features up to 15.0 Gbps bandwidth and supports signals up to 1080p.
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Model: 7914291 SKU: 2301104

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Model: 12415489 SKU: 9636161

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Includes:
  • I Love Lucy: The Audition (1951)
  • I Love Lucy: The Quiz Show (1951)
  • I Love Lucy: The Adagio (1951)
  • I Love Lucy: The Girls Want to Go to a Nightclub (1951)
  • I Love Lucy: Lucy Thinks Ricky Is Trying to Murder Her (1951)
  • I Love Lucy: The Diet (1951)
  • I Love Lucy: Drafted (1951)
  • I Love Lucy: Be a Pal (1951)
  • I Love Lucy: Men Are Messy (1951)
  • I Love Lucy: The Seance (1951)
  • I Love Lucy: The Fur Coat (1951)
  • I Love Lucy: Lucy Is Jealous of Girl Singer (1951)
  • I Love Lucy: The Gossip (1952)
  • I Love Lucy: Cuban Pals (1952)
  • I Love Lucy: Redecorating (1952)
  • I Love Lucy: The Anniversary Present (1952)
  • I Love Lucy: Ricky Asks for a Raise (1952)
  • I Love Lucy: Lucy's Schedule (1952)
  • I Love Lucy: Breaking the Lease (1952)
  • I Love Lucy: Lucy Gets Ricky on the Radio (1952)
  • I Love Lucy: The Marriage License (1952)
  • I Love Lucy: Ricky Loses His Voice (1952)
  • I Love Lucy: The Saxophone (1952)
  • I Love Lucy: Vacation from Marriage (1952)
  • I Love Lucy: The Young Fans (1952)
  • I Love Lucy: Job Switching (1952)
  • I Love Lucy: Pioneer Women (1952)
  • I Love Lucy: The Courtroom (1952)
  • I Love Lucy: The Amateur Hour (1952)
  • I Love Lucy: Lucy Plays Cupid (1952)
  • I Love Lucy: Ricky Thinks He's Getting Bald (1952)
  • I Love Lucy: Lucy Writes a Play (1952)
  • I Love Lucy: Lucy Fakes Illness (1952)
  • I Love Lucy: Lucy Does a TV Commercial (1952)
  • I Love Lucy: The Kleptomaniac (1952)
  • I Love Lucy: The Operetta (1952)
  • I Love Lucy: New Neighbors (1952)
  • I Love Lucy: The Publicity Agent (1952)
  • I Love Lucy: The Benefit (1952)
  • I Love Lucy: The Handcuffs (1952)
  • I Love Lucy: The Ballet (1952)
  • I Love Lucy: The Moustache (1952)
  • I Love Lucy: The Freezer (1952)
  • I Love Lucy: Fred and Ethel Fight (1952)
  • I Love Lucy: Ricky's Life Story (1953)
  • I Love Lucy: Too Many Crooks (1953)
  • I Love Lucy: Lucy Hires an English Tutor (1953)
  • I Love Lucy: Lucy Goes to the Hospital (1953)
  • I Love Lucy: Lucy Becomes a Sculptress (1953)
  • I Love Lucy: Ricky Has Labor Pains (1953)
  • I Love Lucy: The Black Eye (1953)
  • I Love Lucy: Never Do Business With Friends (1953)
  • I Love Lucy: Lucy Tells the Truth (1953)
  • I Love Lucy: Lucy Is Enceinte (1953)
  • I Love Lucy: Ricky and Fred Are TV Fans (1953)
  • I Love Lucy: Lucy's Showbiz Swan Song (1953)
  • I Love Lucy: The Indian Show (1953)
  • I Love Lucy: Sales Resistance (1953)
  • I Love Lucy: Lucy Is Matchmaker (1953)
  • I Love Lucy: Lucy Wants New Furniture (1953)
  • I Love Lucy: Redecorating the Mertzes' Apartment (1953)
  • I Love Lucy: The Million Dollar Idea (1953)
  • I Love Lucy: Lucy Has Her Eyes Examined (1953)
  • I Love Lucy: The French Revue (1953)
  • I Love Lucy: Ricky's Old Girlfriend (1953)
  • I Love Lucy: Lucy Hires a Maid (1953)
  • I Love Lucy: Lucy Changes Her Mind (1953)
  • I Love Lucy: The Girls Go Into Business (1953)
  • I Love Lucy: No Children Allowed (1953)
  • I Love Lucy: Changing the Boys' Wardrobe (1953)
  • I Love Lucy: The Ricardos Change Apartments (1953)
  • I Love Lucy: Equal Rights (1953)
  • I Love Lucy: Baby Pictures (1953)
  • I Love Lucy: Lucy's Last Birthday (1953)
  • I Love Lucy: Pregnant Women Are Unpredictable (1953)
  • I Love Lucy: The Inferiority Complex (1953)
  • I Love Lucy: The Camping Trip (1953)
  • I Love Lucy: The Club Election (1953)
  • I Love Lucy: Lucy and Ethel Buy the Same Dress (1953)
  • I Love Lucy: The Charm School (1954)
  • I Love Lucy: Bonus Bucks (1954)
  • I Love Lucy: Lucy Is Envious (1954)
  • I Love Lucy: Ricky's Screen Test (1954)
  • I Love Lucy: The Golf Game (1954)
  • I Love Lucy: The Black Wig (1954)
  • I Love Lucy: Ricky's Contract (1954)
  • I Love Lucy: Getting Ready (1954)
  • I Love Lucy: Lucy Cries Wolf (1954)
  • I Love Lucy: Tennessee Ernie Visits (1954)
  • I Love Lucy: Fan Magazine Interview (1954)
  • I Love Lucy: The Business Manager (1954)
  • I Love Lucy: Lucy's Mother-in-Law (1954)
  • I Love Lucy: Sentimental Anniversary (1954)
  • I Love Lucy: The Matchmaker (1954)
  • I Love Lucy: Home Movies (1954)
  • I Love Lucy: Ricky's Movie Offer (1954)
  • I Love Lucy: Lucy's Club Dance (1954)
  • I Love Lucy: Oil Wells (1954)
  • I Love Lucy: The Diner (1954)
  • I Love Lucy: Ricky Minds the Baby (1954)
  • I Love Lucy: Mertz and Kurtz (1954)
  • I Love Lucy: Ethel's Birthday (1954)
  • I Love Lucy: Ricky's Hawaiian Vacation (1954)
  • I Love Lucy: Tennessee Ernie Hangs On (1954)
  • I Love Lucy: Ricky Loses His Temper (1954)
  • I Love Lucy: Lucy Writes a Novel (1954)
  • I Love Lucy: The Sublease (1954)
  • I Love Lucy: The Hedda Hopper Story (1955)
  • I Love Lucy: L.A. at Last! (1955)
  • I Love Lucy: In Palm Springs (1955)
  • I Love Lucy: The Dancing Star (1955)
  • I Love Lucy: Hollywood Anniversary (1955)
  • I Love Lucy: The Star Upstairs (1955)
  • I Love Lucy: Don Juan Is Shelved (1955)
  • I Love Lucy: Bull Fight Dance (1955)
  • I Love Lucy: Lucy Learns to Drive (1955)
  • I Love Lucy: First Stop (1955)
  • I Love Lucy: Don Juan and the Starlets (1955)
  • I Love Lucy: Lucy and the Dummy (1955)
  • I Love Lucy: The Great Train Robbery (1955)
  • I Love Lucy: Ricky Sells the Car (1955)
  • I Love Lucy: Ricky Needs an Agent (1955)
  • I Love Lucy: Ethel's Home Town (1955)
  • I Love Lucy: Tennessee Bound (1955)
  • I Love Lucy: Ricky's European Booking (1955)
  • I Love Lucy: Lucy and John Wayne (1955)
  • I Love Lucy: Lucy Visits Grauman's (1955)
  • I Love Lucy: The Tour (1955)
  • I Love Lucy: The Fashion Show (1955)
  • I Love Lucy: Lucy Gets in Pictures (1955)
  • I Love Lucy: The Passports (1955)
  • I Love Lucy: Lucy Goes to a Rodeo (1955)
  • I Love Lucy: The Mr. and Mrs. TV Show (1955)
  • I Love Lucy: Nursery School (1955)
  • I Love Lucy: California, Here We Come! (1955)
  • I Love Lucy: Lucy and Harpo Marx (1955)
  • I Love Lucy: Homecoming (1955)
  • I Love Lucy: The Ricardos Are Interviewed (1955)
  • I Love Lucy: Lucy and Bob Hope (1956)
  • I Love Lucy: Second Honeymoon (1956)
  • I Love Lucy: Staten Island Ferry (1956)
  • I Love Lucy: Little Ricky's School Pageant (1956)
  • I Love Lucy: Lucy Meets Charles Boyer (1956)
  • I Love Lucy: Return Home From Europe (1956)
  • I Love Lucy: Little Ricky Learns to Play the Drums (1956)
  • I Love Lucy: Visitor From Italy (1956)
  • I Love Lucy: Lucy in the Swiss Alps (1956)
  • I Love Lucy: The Fox Hunt (1956)
  • I Love Lucy: Bon Voyage (1956)
  • I Love Lucy: Desert Island (1956)
  • I Love Lucy: Lucy Gets Homesick in Italy (1956)
  • I Love Lucy: Lucy Meets the Queen (1956)
  • I Love Lucy: Paris at Last (1956)
  • I Love Lucy: Little Ricky Gets Stage Fright (1956)
  • I Love Lucy: Lucy's Italian Movie (1956)
  • I Love Lucy: Lucy's Bicycle Trip (1956)
  • I Love Lucy: The Ricardos Visit Cuba (1956)
  • I Love Lucy: Lucy Goes to Monte Carlo (1956)
  • I Love Lucy: Lucy Meets Orson Welles (1956)
  • I Love Lucy: Lucy Goes to Scotland (1956)
  • I Love Lucy: Lucy Gets a Paris Gown (1956)
  • I Love Lucy: Off to Florida (1956)
  • I Love Lucy: Lucy and Superman (1957)
  • I Love Lucy: Lucy Raises Tulips (1957)
  • I Love Lucy: Lucy and the Loving Cup (1957)
  • I Love Lucy: Lucy Raises Chickens (1957)
  • I Love Lucy: Little Ricky Gets a Dog (1957)
  • I Love Lucy: Lucy Does the Tango (1957)
  • I Love Lucy: Lucy's Night in Town (1957)
  • I Love Lucy: Country Club Dance (1957)
  • I Love Lucy: Lucy Misses the Mertzes (1957)
  • I Love Lucy: Lucy Hates to Leave (1957)
  • I Love Lucy: Lucy Wants to Move to the Country (1957)
  • I Love Lucy: The Ricardos Dedicate a Statue (1957)
  • I Love Lucy: Housewarming (1957)
  • I Love Lucy: Building a B.B.Q. (1957)
  • I Love Lucy: Ragtime Band (1957)
  • I Love Lucy: Lucy Gets Chummy With the Neighbors (1957)

    I Love Lucy: The Audition
    A TV talent scout intends to drop in at the Trocadero to catch Ricky's (Desi Arnaz) act, and naturally Lucy (Lucille Ball) assumes that this is her chance to finally break into show business. The golden opportunity arrives when Buffo the Clown (Pat Moran), who performs a specialty with Ricky, is sidelined by an accident. The result: Lucy, dressed in Buffo's outlandish costume, joins Ricky's act, culminating in the classic moment in which she imitates a trained seal! This episode is a remake of the original I Love Lucy pilot, filmed in 1950. (Incidentally, the "actors" playing the network reps include I Love Lucy producer Jess Oppenheimer and real-life CBS executive Harry Ackerman). ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    I Love Lucy: The Quiz Show
    Ever on the lookout for some quick and easy money, Lucy (Lucille Ball) becomes a contestant on the popular radio quiz show "Females Are Fabulous" (a spoof of Art Linkletter's People Are Funny). Host Freddie Fillmore (Frank Nelson in the first of many I Love Lucy appearances) offers to pay Lucy 1,000 dollars if she can convince Ricky (Desi Arnaz) that she was married before him, with the help of paid actor who will show up at the Ricardo doorstep claiming to be Lucy's "long-lost first husband." Predictably, Lucy mistakes a hobo (John Emery) for her phony hubby, and confusion reigns supreme. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    I Love Lucy: The Adagio
    Determined to appear in Ricky's nightclub act, Lucy (Lucille Ball) hires handsome Frenchman Jean Valjean Raymand (Shepard Menken) to teach her the Apache dance. Unfortunately, Raymand is the flirtatious type, and he begins making harmless but ardent advances upon Lucy. This farcical situation culminates in a duel to the death between Ricky (Desi Arnaz) and Raymand -- or at least that's what Lucy (Lucille Ball) is led to believe. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    I Love Lucy: The Girls Want to Go to a Nightclub
    It's the Mertzes' 18th wedding anniversary, and Lucy (Lucille Ball) and Ethel (Vivian Vance) want to celebrate with a night at the Copacabana club. Unfortunately, hubbies Ricky (Desi Arnaz) and Fred (William Frawley) have their hearts set on attending the fights. The inevitable argument ensues, with Lucy and Ethel huffily telling the boys that they intend to go to the Copa with male escorts, whereupon Ricky and Fred respond that they will still attend the fights, with dates of their own. As things turn out, Ricky and Fred end up dating Lucy and Ethel, who are "disguised" as a pair of hillbillies. Desi Arnaz sings "Guadalajara" in this, the first I Love Lucy episode to be telecast (but not the first one filmed). ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Lucy Thinks Ricky Is Trying to Murder Her
    Engrossed in the whodunit novel "The Mockingbird Murder Case," Lucy (Lucille Ball) convinces herself that Ricky (Desi Arnaz) plans to bump her off -- and this suspicion seems to be confirmed when Ethel (Vivian Vance) uses cards to predict Lucy's future (or lack of same). Unwitting Ricky fuels Lucy's fears when he discusses "getting rid of her" over the phone, though in fact he is merely asking his agent to remove a trained dog from his nightclub act! One misunderstanding leads to another, and by episode's end a desperate Lucy shows up in the middle of Ricky's performance at the Trocadero, prepared to accuse him of poisoning her. This was the first I Love Lucy episode to be filmed, though not the first to be telecast. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    I Love Lucy: The Diet
    Upon hearing that Ricky (Desi Arnaz) needs a new singer for his nightclub act, Lucy (Lucille Ball) insists upon auditioning for the job. Unfortunately, she is unable to squeeze into the former singer's size 12 gown. Inaugurating a crash diet, Lucy vows to lose a dozen pounds in the four days before Ricky unveils his new act -- but such a monumental undertaking is easier said than done! This is the classic episode in which Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz perform "Cuban Pete" from their pre-I Love Lucy nightclub tour. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Drafted
    A series of misunderstandings lead Lucy (Lucille Ball) and Ethel (Vivian Vance) to believe that their husbands have been drafted into the Army -- while Ricky (Desi Arnaz) and Fred (William Frawley) become convinced that their wives are pregnant. Things come to a head when the girls plan a going-away party on the same night that the boys stage a baby shower. When this episode originally aired on Christmas Eve of 1951, longtime comedy foil Vernon Dent made an appearance as Santa Claus in the closing scene; this sequence has since been cut from all syndication prints. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Be a Pal
    Convinced that Ricky (Desi Arnaz) has lost interest in her, Lucy (Lucille Ball) vows to win back his affections -- using a book called "How to Keep Your Honeymoon From Ending" as her guide. Not surprisingly, Lucy's various strategies -- dressing glamorously for breakfast, joining Ricky's weekly poker game, and so on -- fail spectacularly. As a last-ditch effort, Lucy redecorates the apartment as a replica of Desi's homeland of Cuba, following the book's advice that she should surround her hubby with "things that remind him of his childhood." However, hauling chickens a mule into the apartment may be a case of Lucy's gilding the lily once more! ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Men Are Messy
    Fed up with Ricky's (Desi Arnaz) sloppiness, neat-freak Lucy (Lucille Ball) divides their apartment in half. When this act fails to change Ricky's ways, Lucy decides to teach him a lesson when press agent Kenny Morgan (playing himself) arranges an at-home interview with the Ricardos for "Halfbeat," a magazine for professional musicians. With the help of the Mertzes, Lucy convinces the interviewer that the Ricardo apartment is nothing more than a huge pile of junk and dirty clothes -- and need we add that the scheme backfires spectacularly? ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    I Love Lucy: The Seance
    Hoping to help Ricky (Desi Arnaz) land a job with theatrical producer Mr. Meriweather (Jay Novello), Lucy (Lucille Ball) "casually" lets slip that she shares Meriweather's fascination with numerology and horoscopes. Enlisting the aid of her pal Ethel (Vivian Vance), Lucy arranges an elaborate séance, wherein Meriweather contacts the spirit of his late, beloved Tillie. But will "Madame Ethel Mertzola" be able to carry out the charade without Meriweather catching on? If for nothing else, this episode will always be remembered for the deathless line "Ethel to Tillie...Come in Tillie...." ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    I Love Lucy: The Fur Coat
    Ricky (Desi Arnaz) brings home a 3,250-dollar mink coat that he has rented for his nightclub act. Jumping to conclusions as usual, Lucy (Lucille Ball) assumes that Ricky has purchased the coat for her anniversary present. In desperation, Ricky inveigles Fred (William Frawley) into posing as a thief so that the coat can be "stolen" and safely returned to its rightful owner. The plan goes awry when a real thief (played by veteran movie heavy Ben Welden) shows up unexpectedly -- and that's only the beginning of the story! ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Lucy Is Jealous of Girl Singer
    Thanks to a blind item in a newspaper gossip column, Lucy (Lucille Ball) mistakenly believes that Ricky (Desi Arnaz) is having an affair with Rosemary (Helen Silver), the singer in his nightclub act. Intending to spy on her husband, Lucy worms her way into the chorus at the Tropicana. As a result, Ricky's musical act becomes a slapstick comedy routine, thanks to that "strange girl" in the chorus line -- but will Ricky figure out who that strange girl really is? ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    I Love Lucy: The Gossip
    Ricky (Desi Arnaz) and Fred (William Frawley) demand that Lucy (Lucille Ball) and Ethel (Vivian Vance) stop spreading gossip, but the girls insists that the boys are as gossipy as they are. Thus, a wager is established: whoever can abstain the longest from gossiping will be served breakfast in bed for a month. Determined to win the wager, Ricky and Fred indulge in some underhanded trickery, forcing Lucy and Ethel to foment a false rumor about Mr. and Mrs. Foster and their milkman. As a result, a smirking Ricky and Fred are seen lying in bed, with Lucy and Ethel waiting on them hand and foot -- but it isn't long before the tables will turn in a spectacular fashion. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Cuban Pals
    Upon hearing that Renita Periz (Lita Baron), a "little" girl with whom Ricky (Desi Arnaz) used to dance in Cuba, is coming to New York, Lucy (Lucille Ball) insists that Ricky and Renita dance again for the sake of the "Good Neighbor Policy." What Lucy doesn't know is that "little" Renita has grown up to be quite a sexy young lady -- and when she finds out, the redhead turns green with jealousy. The situation is hilariously resolved during Ricky's act at the Tropicana Club, in which Lucy becomes the unwilling partner of Renita's usual dancing partner, Ramon -- a fearsome-looking hombre indeed. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Redecorating
    Lucy (Lucille Ball) and Ethel (Vivian Vance) enter a contest in hopes of winning expensive new household furniture. As a result, Lucy must remain at home, awaiting the all-important phone call from the contest organizers. At the same time, Ricky (Desi Arnaz) has secured four tickets for the new Rodgers & Hammerstein musical. Figuring that he'll never be able to pry Lucy away from the phone in time to see the show, Ricky conspires with Fred (William Frawley) to place a phony call, telling the girls that they've won the contest. The scheme backfires when, in anticipation of receiving brand-new furniture, Lucy sells all her "old" furniture to a secondhand dealer (Hans Conreid) -- then uses the cash to ostentatiously redecorate the apartment. Yes, this is the classic "wallpapering" episode, far funnier seen than described. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: The Anniversary Present
    With his wedding anniversary approaching, Ricky (Desi Arnaz) secretly arranges to buy a string of pearls for Lucy (Lucille Ball), using the Ricardos' neighbor Grace Foster (Gloria Blondell) as a go-between. Upon finding out that Ricky has gone pearl shopping, Lucy jumps to the conclusion that her husband is having an affair with Grace. The misunderstanding is played to the hilt, with Ricky's every word and move seeming to confirm Lucy's worst suspicions. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Ricky Asks for a Raise
    Ricky (Desi Arnaz) works up the courage to ask for a raise from his boss, Mr. Littlefield (Gale Gordon), only to be informed that he is being replaced at the Tropicana Club by bandleader Xavier Valdez. Hoping to win back Ricky's job, Lucy (Lucille Ball) devises a scheme whereby she, Ethel (Vivian Vance), and Fred (William Frawley) show up at the club in various disguises to book reservations -- then to cancel them upon "discovering" that Ricky will not be appearing. Need it be added that the scheme backfires in an outrageous fashion? This was the final episode of I Love Lucy's first season. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Lucy's Schedule
    Gale Gordon, who would later co-star with Lucille Ball on TV's The Lucy Show, is seen in this I Love Lucy episode as Alvin Littlefield, the boss of Lucy Ricardo's husband, Ricky (Desi Arnaz). The plot involves Ricky's displeasure when Lucy shows up late for a dinner appointment with Mr. and Mrs. Littlefield (Edith Meiser). Ricky promptly puts Lucy on a rigid schedule, then informs Mr. Littlefield of this fact in hopes of currying favor with his boss. Meanwhile, an angry Lucy plots to get even with Ricky by putting on an act designed to convince Littlefield that her husband is a merciless slave driver -- with unexpected results. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Breaking the Lease
    After a night of fun and conviviality at the Ricardo house, Fred (William Frawley) and Ethel (Vivian Vance) bid good night to their best friends and head back to their own apartment. Still in a party mood, Lucy (Lucille Ball) and Ricky (Desi Arnaz) continue to sing and make merry -- whereupon the now-sleepy Mertzes phone upstairs, ordering the Ricardos to pipe down. This leads to a series of insults and recriminations, culminating in an angry Ricky threatening to move out of the apartment. And when an equally angry Ethel informs him that he'd better pay the next five months' rent, per their contract, Ricky and Lucy vengefully embark upon a campaign to break their lease in as loud and obnoxious a manner as possible! The soundtrack of this episode was later adapted as the pilot show for an unsold I Love Lucy radio spin-off. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Lucy Gets Ricky on the Radio
    Lucy (Lucille Ball) is amazed when Ricky (Desi Arnaz) comes up with all the correct answers while listening to the radio program "The Mr. and Mrs. Quiz Show." What Lucy doesn't know is that Ricky had been in the radio studio while the show was being taped -- but by the time she finds this out, she and Ricky have been booked to appear on the program. Managing to "borrow" the answers for the upcoming broadcast, Lucy manages to commit them to memory. Alas, by the time the show airs, the questions and the answers have been changed, leading to a chaotic situation which ends only when Ricky says the "wrong" thing at the "right" time. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: The Marriage License
    Because of a minor error on their wedding license, Lucy (Lucille Ball) is convinced that she is no longer legally married to Ricky (Desi Arnaz). Taking advantage of the situation, Lucy insists that Ricky court her all over again, and that he drop to his knees to propose marriage in the most archaic "love language" imaginable. The situation is played to the hilt, culminating in an elopement in the wilds of New England. When originally telecast in April 1952, this I Love Lucy episode was seen by more viewers than any other TV show in history (ten million!). ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Ricky Loses His Voice
    Ricky (Desi Arnaz) develops laryngitis just when he is slated to stage an elaborate floor show for the reopening of the Trocadero Club. Unable to reach club owner Mr. Chambers (Arthur Q. Bryan) in time to deliver the bad news, Lucy takes the bull by the horns and vows to stage the show herself. To help Lucy out, Fred Mertz (William Frawley) calls in some favors from several of his former vaudeville cronies -- and the result is an "up-to-date" musical review, "Flapper Follies of 1927," featuring the world's oldest chorus line! ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: The Saxophone
    When she finds out that Ricky's band is about to embark upon a tour, Lucy (Lucille Ball) insists upon joining the band as a saxophonist -- but since her repertoire is limited to an off-key version of "Glow Worm," Ricky (Desi Arnaz) refuses. Determined to prevent Ricky from going on tour, Lucy concocts a scheme to make her husband jealous. The end result is a closetful of "other men" -- and a very confused Ricky. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Vacation from Marriage
    Figuring that their marriages are in a rut, the Ricardos and the Mertzes decide to take a week's "vacation" from matrimony. Thus, Lucy (Lucille Ball) and Ethel (Vivian Vance) move into the Mertz apartment, while Ricky (Desi Arnaz) and Fred (William Frawley) take up residence in the Ricardo domicile. It isn't long before the girls miss the boys terribly, and vice versa -- but neither "couple" is willing to admit to having made a mistake with the vacation idea. Things get really dicey when Lucy and Ethel decide to check on their hubbies by clambering onto the roof of the apartment building -- only to get locked out! ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: The Young Fans
    A decidedly pre-Rambo Richard Crenna guests in this episode as Arthur Morton, a squeaky-voiced teenager who is the boyfriend of impressionable high schooler Peggy Dawson (Janet Waldo, later the voice of Judy on The Jetsons). Unfortunately, Peggy has dropped Arthur in favor of her new heartthrob -- none other than Ricky Ricardo (Desi Arnaz)! Lucy (Lucille Ball) takes it upon herself to deflect Peggy and help Arthur win back the girl's love, but the plan backfires. Finally, Lucy and Ricky conspire to scare Peggy back into Arthur's arms by posing as the oldest married couple in the world -- and we mean the oldest. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Job Switching
    Season two of I Love Lucy gets under way with one of the series' funniest and most famous episodes. Fed up with their "spendthrift" wives, Ricky (Desi Arnaz) and Fred (William Frawley) insist that the girls would not be so free and easy with money if they had to go out and earn it. Lucy (Lucille Ball) and Ethel (Vivian Vance) counter this argument by claiming that housework is far more difficult than doing an "outside" job. To prove their respective points, the husbands and the wives agree to switch places for one week, with Ricky and Fred handling the domestic chores while Lucy and Ethel go out and "bring home the bacon." Without revealing any more, suffice it to say that this is the episode in which the girls land assembly-line jobs at Kramer's Kandy Kitchen (yes, it's the one with the conveyor belt and the "runaway" chocolates!). ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Pioneer Women
    Lucy (Lucille Ball) and Ethel (Vivian Vance) demand that Ricky (Desi Arnaz) and Fred (William Frawley) buy them electric dishwashers. The boys refuse, insisting that the girls have it too "soft" as it is. Before long, the husbands place a 50-dollar bet that they can live longer without modern appliances than their wives. As a result, the Ricardos and the Mertzes adopt the lifestyles of their grandparents in the "Gay Nineties" -- with unexpected consequences. This episode marks one of the few times that I Love Lucy indulges in an "impossible" gag, involving a loaf of bread that rises to a length of 18 feet! ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: The Courtroom
    When Ricky (Desi Arnaz) inadvertently wrecks the new television set that he and Lucy (Lucille Ball) have given the Mertzes as an anniversary present, Fred (William Frawley) retaliates by breaking the Ricardos' TV. The upshot of all this is a courtroom date, with the Ricardos suing the Mertzes and vice versa. The proceedings begin to resemble a madhouse, as Ricky acts as his own lawyer, Lucy delivers impassioned (and largely inaccurate) testimony, Fred glowers and growls, and Ethel (Vivian Vance) flirts with the judge (Moroni Olsen). It is up to "his honor" to resolve matters, though in the end he is less happy with the results than either of the plaintiffs. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: The Amateur Hour
    In order to raise enough money to purchase a new dress, Lucy (Lucille Ball) goes into the babysitting business. Alas, her first charges are a pair of precocious twins (David Stollery, Sammy Ogg), who not only throw Lucy into a state of confusion, but very nearly burn her at the stake (with an apple in her mouth!). Things turn out for the best when Lucy and the twins perform a prize-winning act at the Blue Bird Club Amateur Contest. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Lucy Plays Cupid
    This episode marks the first time that I Love Lucy relied upon guest stars, namely Edward Everett Horton and Bea Benaderet (who had been Lucille Ball's first choice to play her next-door neighbor on the series). Aware that elderly spinster Miss Lewis (Benaderet) thinks that her equally aged grocery man Mr. Ritter (Horton) is the bee's knees, Lucy (Lucille Ball) decides to play matchmaker for the venerable couple. Since Miss Lewis is too shy to invite Mr. Ritter to dinner, Lucy does it for her. The result: Mr. Ritter misinterprets the situation, and becomes convinced that Lucy has fallen for him! ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Ricky Thinks He's Getting Bald
    When Ricky (Desi Arnaz) begins wearing a hat at all times -- even in the living room -- Lucy (Lucille Ball) jumps to the conclusion that her husband is losing his hair, or at the very least is worried about getting bald. In concert with her pal Ethel (Vivian Vance), Lucy concocts a wacky scheme to put her husband at ease. When this fails, she resorts to using drastic "sure-fire remedies" to restore Ricky's hair. Milton Parsons, an actor usually cast as cadaverous undertakers, is here seen as Mr. Thurlow, the bald-pated manager of a hair-restoration emporium. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Lucy Writes a Play
    Determined to break into show business by any means possible, Lucy (Lucille Ball) gets hold of a typewriter and composes a play, "A Tree Grows in Havana," which she describes as "the heartwarming story of a Cuban tobacco picker." Naturally, she expects Ricky (Desi Arnaz) to take the leading role, but when Ricky refuses, she must settle for Fred Mertz (William Frawley) -- wretchedly phony accent and all. By the time the play is performed for Lucy's women's club, she has converted it into an English drawing-room drama, "The Perils of Pamela." Alas, Ricky has decided to star in the play after all, in hopes of impressing an important movie producer -- but Ricky doesn't know that the play's locale (and accents) have been radically altered. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Lucy Fakes Illness
    Again hoping to hornswoggle Ricky (Desi Arnaz) into hiring her for his nightclub act, Lucy (Lucille Ball) decides to feign a complete nervous breakdown. Using a psychology book as her guide, Lucy intends to break up her "malady" into three stages. First, she takes on the personality of her favorite celebrity, Tallulah Bankhead; next, she intends to fake amnesia; and finally, she will revert to childhood. But Ricky figures out what is going on, and hires his pal Hal March (playing himself) to pose as a "Dr. Stevenson" to throw a good, healthy scare into Lucy. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Lucy Does a TV Commercial
    One of the funniest I Love Lucy half-hours ever filmed, this is the episode in which stagestruck Lucy (Lucille Ball) becomes a commercial spokeswoman on a major live TV program emceed by Ricky (Desi Arnaz). Lucy is hired to promote a liquid medicinal tonic called Vitameatavegamin, requiring her to not only extoll the product's praises but also sample a tablespoonful on-camera. Unfortunately, the ad copy for Vitameatavegamin is so long-winded and complicated that Lucy must rehearse her pitch over and over again, and drink sample after sample of the product. Even more unfortunately (and more hilariously), Vitameatavegamin contains 23-percent alcohol. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: The Kleptomaniac
    Ricky (Desi Arnaz) finds an unusually large amount of money in Lucy's purse, and also stumbles upon a closetful of silverware and other unfamiliar-looking valuables. Not knowing that Lucy (Lucille Ball) is merely collecting items for a charity bazaar, Ricky jumps to the conclusion that his wife is a kleptomaniac. A psychiatrist, Dr. Tom Robinson (Joseph Kearns) is brought in by Ricky to hypnotize Lucy in order to "cure" her of her ailment -- but Lucy, aware of what Ricky is up to, decides to teach her husband a lesson...and what a lesson. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: The Operetta
    When her ladies' club finds itself short of funds -- thanks largely to her own "creative bookkeeping" -- Lucy (Lucille Ball) frets that the club will not be able to afford the royalty fees for the operetta that is slated to be performed for its 25th anniversary. Then, inspiration strikes: Lucy and Ethel (Vivian Vance) will pen a royalty-free operetta themselves, and rent all sets and costumes with a post-dated check. And as icing on the cake, Lucy, Ethel, Ricky (Desi Arnaz), and Fred (William Frawley) will play the main roles themselves. Unfortunately, the premiere performance of "The Pleasant Peasant" is rudely interrupted by the men from the rental company, who proceed to remove all the costumes and sets even as the four "stars" sing their hearts out. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: New Neighbors
    Dying of curiosity, Lucy (Lucille Ball) and Ethel (Vivian Vance) are determined to get a glimpse of their somewhat secretive new neighbors, Mr. and Mrs. O'Brien (Hayden Rorke, K.T. Stevens). Unbeknownst to the girls, the O'Briens are professional actors, currently rehearsing a play in which they are cast as enemy spies. Hiding in the O'Briens' closet, Lucy (Lucille Ball) is appalled to overhear the couple apparently scheming to blow up the Capitol building. One misunderstanding leads to another, and by episode's end Ethel, Ricky (Desi Arnaz), Fred (William Frawley), and a confused cop (Allen Jenkins) are swept in Lucy's hairbrained scheme to save the country from the "evil" O'Briens. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: The Publicity Agent
    Lucy (Lucille Ball) cooks up a publicity stunt in order to improve business at the Tropicana, the club where her bandleader husband, Ricky (Desi Arnaz), works. The scheme obliges Lucy to pose as the "Maharincess of Franistan," who has ostensibly arrived in America to see her favorite entertainer -- namely, Ricky. Figuring out that the Maharincess and Lucy are one and the same, Ricky concocts a scheme of his own to teach his wife a lesson...a scheme involving a pair of sinister-looking "assassins." ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: The Benefit
    Lucy (Lucille Ball) will not allow Ricky (Desi Arnaz) to perform at a benefit for Ethel's women's club unless she is allowed to perform as well. Ethel (Vivian Vance) and Fred (William Frawley) conspire with Ricky to work up a song-and-comedy act which will include Lucy, but will prohibit her from telling jokes or singing. Unfortunately for the the conspirators, Lucy tumbles to their plans, ultimately (and hilariously) sabotaging the act with her own inimitable ad-libs -- not to mention a chorus of "Under the Bamboo Tree." An abbreviated version of this episode was adapted as a touring stage act for the I Love Lucy cast, and was also featured in an all-star televised tribute to the United Nations in 1953. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    I Love Lucy: The Handcuffs
    Having seen Fred (William Frawley) perform a magic act with a set of trick handcuffs, Lucy (Lucille Ball) decides to use the same "bracelets" to force Ricky (Desi Arnaz) to spend the evening with her rather than attending a rehearsal. Unfortunately, the handcuffs are so old that no key exists to open them -- and thus Lucy faces the possibility of being manacled to Ricky for the rest of her life! The fun really begins when Ricky tries to perform his act on TV with Lucy, still firmly shackled to his wrist, trying to remain as "inconspicuous" as possible. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: The Ballet
    In this classic episode, Lucy (Lucille Ball) once again goes to extreme lengths to appear in Ricky's nightclub act. Apprised that Ricky (Desi Arnaz) is looking for a ballerina and a burlesque comic, Lucy first takes ballet lessons from the imperious Mme. LaMond (Mary Wickes) -- and ends up with her foot stuck in the practicing bar. Next, Lucy persuades a baggy-pants comedian (Frank J. Scannell) to teach her the vintage burlesque chestnut "Slowly I Turned," replete with custard pies and seltzer water. Inevitably, Lucy shows up in the middle of Ricky's act at the Trocadero -- little realizing that this is the evening that the ballerina, and not the comic, is supposed to appear. Desi Arnaz sings "Martha." ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: The Moustache
    Having grown a moustache for a TV role, Ricky (Desi Arnaz) seems disinclined to shave off his new lip adornment. Hoping to get Ricky to remove the moustache, Lucy (Lucille Ball) decides to prove how silly he looks by donning a false beard. Alas, the beard has been fastened to Lucy's jowls with "Bulldog Cement" rather than spirit gum -- and nothing she can do will remove the whiskers. Making matters even worse, Ricky is bringing home a talent scout in hopes of landing another TV part. Anxious to make a good impression on the scout, Lucy hatches a scheme to "logically" hide that pesky beard -- and guess what happens next! ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: The Freezer
    Lucy (Lucille Ball) and Ethel (Vivian Vance) think they've gotten a real bargain when they purchase a freezer for only 50 dollars. Alas, the ladies then decide to buy "two sides of beef" from Johnson's Meat Company, little realizing that they've ordered 700 pounds of meat for a total cost of 483 dollars! Realizing that their husbands will go ballistic when they find out about this transaction, Lucy and Ethel desperately try to sell the beef to unwitting bystanders. Somehow this situation culminates in Lucy being trapped inside the freezer, emerging as a redheaded "popsicle." ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Fred and Ethel Fight
    Hoping to patch up a quarrel between Fred (William Frawley) and Ethel (Vivian Vance), Lucy (Lucille Ball) and Ricky (Desi Arnaz) scheme to reunite the couple at a small dinner party. Unfortunately, this results in another argument -- between Lucy and Ricky. Conspiring with Ethel to win back her husband, Lucy pretends to have been injured in a bus accident. Yes, this is the episode in which our heroine is encased in a huge body cast -- only to be forced to vacate her bedroom in a hurry when Ricky, who is himself trying to get back into Lucy's good graces, fakes an apartment fire from which he plans to "save" her. (Watch for the not-so-subtle "plug" for I Love Lucy's then sponsor, Phillip Morris cigarettes.) ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Ricky's Life Story
    No synopsis available.

    I Love Lucy: Too Many Crooks
    The neighborhood is currently being held in thrall by an elusive female burglar known only as "Madame X." Through a series of typical I Love Lucy misunderstandings, Lucy (Lucille Ball) and Ethel (Vivian Vance) each suspect the other of being Madame X, and accordingly go to great lengths to catch one another "in the act." Things come to a hilarious head when the real Madame X shows up just as both Lucy and Ethel prepare for their last great pounce. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Lucy Hires an English Tutor
    Worried that her baby will be adversely affected by the "sloppy" use of the English language in the Ricardo household, expectant mother Lucy (Lucille Ball) hires an English tutor named Percy Livermore (Hans Conried) for herself and Ricky (Desi Arnaz). After several grueling sessions about what not to say in front of the baby (remember those fatal words "okay," "swell," and "lousy"), a frustrated Ricky discovers that Lucy has convinced Livermore to waive his fee in exchange for Ricky allowing the erudite Englishman to recite a sappy poem at the Trocadero. It is at this point that Ricky makes a better deal to Livermore -- and in the process neatly punctures all of Lucy's pretensions. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Lucy Goes to the Hospital
    With Lucy (Lucille Ball) about to give birth at any minute, Ricky (Desi Arnaz) is determined that her trip to the hospital will be staged in as calm and orderly a manner as possible. To that end, Lucy, Ricky, Fred (William Frawley), and Ethel (Vivian Vance) go through a series of painstakingly detailed "dress rehearsals," with each person handling one of the crucial responsibilities. Not surprisingly, when the big moment finally arrives, all of Ricky's carefully calculated planning goes right out the window -- and when he, Fred, and Ethel have finally rushed out of the apartment, poor Lucy has been left behind! Perhaps the most famous of all I Love Lucy episodes, this program was originally seen by more viewers than any previous show in TV history. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Lucy Becomes a Sculptress
    This week, expectant mother Lucy (Lucille Ball) has decided that her baby needs an "artistic" influence upon entering the world. To this end, Lucy takes up sculpting, and in the process is fast-talked into purchasing 50 pounds of expensive modeling clay. Hoping to stem this financial drain, Ricky (Desi Arnaz) sets about to discourage Lucy by convincing her that she has no artistic talent. One thing leads to another, and by episode's end an important art critic (Paul Harvey) has offered 500 dollars for Lucy's first "bust" -- which is actually Lucy's own head, buried under a layer of clay. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Ricky Has Labor Pains
    Although it is Lucy (Lucille Ball) who is pregnant, it is Ricky (Desi Arnaz) who is suffering "morning sickness." Concluding that Ricky's illness is psychosomatic, the result of jealousy over all the attention being showered upon Lucy, our heroine hatches a scheme to make Ricky feel important again. Unfortunately, the "daddy shower" planned by Lucy becomes a stag party engineered by Fred (William Frawley), leading to the usual misunderstandings and conclusion-jumping. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: The Black Eye
    Overhearing Lucy (Lucille Ball) say "Hit me -- I dare you!," the Mertzes are shocked -- but not nearly as shocked as when Lucy emerges from her apartment with a black eye. Of course, Fred (William Frawley) and Ethel (Vivian Vance) have no idea that Lucy was merely reading out loud from a murder mystery, nor are they aware that her black eye was the result of a silly accident. Armed with only circumstantial evidence, the Mertzes jump to the conclusion that Ricky has struck Lucy -- and before this and all subsequent misunderstandings are finally ironed out, virtually everyone in the cast is sporting a "shiner." ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Never Do Business With Friends
    The truth inherent in the title of this episode is vividly illustrated when the Ricardos sell their old washing machine to the Mertzes. The machine immediately malfunctions, whereupon Fred (William Frawley) and Ethel (Vivian Vance) demand that Lucy (Lucille Ball) and Ricky (Desi Arnaz) cancel the bill of sale, which amounts to 35 dollars. Lucy and Ricky refuse, insisting that since the Mertzes now own the washer, they are obliged to pay up. Not one but two zany slapstick set pieces ensue, concluding with a memorable climactic struggle on a second-story porch. This was the final episode of I Love Lucy's second season. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Lucy Tells the Truth
    Ricky (Desi Arnaz), Fred (William Frawley), and Ethel (Vivian Vance) bet Lucy (Lucille Ball) one hundred dollars that she can't tell the truth for 24 hours. Determined to win her bet, Lucy manages to offend all of her bridge-playing friends by refusing to coddle them with her usual little white lies. The acid test comes when Lucy is forced to reveal her true age -- and worse, her true weight. In typical I Love Lucy fashion, the situation is resolved in a burst of hilarious physical comedy, as Lucy is obliged to prove her self-proclaimed show-business talents by appearing at the wrong end of a knife-throwing act! ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Lucy Is Enceinte
    "Enceinte" is French for "pregnant," a word that was largely taboo on American television in 1953. Even so, Lucille Ball was pregnant -- no getting around it -- and this fact would have to be written into I Love Lucy. Thrilled at the prospect of being a mother after many years of marriage, Lucy Ricardo (Lucille Ball) must now figure out the best way to break the news to her husband, Ricky (Desi Arnaz). After several false starts, the big moment occurs at the Trocadero Club, right in the middle of Ricky's floor show -- a superbly touching moment, and one of the most unforgettable I Love Lucy scenes of all. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Ricky and Fred Are TV Fans
    Lucy (Lucille Ball) and Ethel (Vivian Vance) are unable to pry Ricky (Desi Arnaz) and Fred (William Frawley) away from the TV when the fights are on. In desperation, the girls decide to go out on their own for a bite to eat, leaving the boys firmly planted on the living-room couch. Unfortunately, everyone at the neighborhood diner is glued to the televised fights as well, including police officer Jenkins (Allen Jenkins). Taking drastic action, Lucy and Ethel decide to snip the TV antenna wires on the top of their apartment building -- when who should arrive on the scene but the selfsame Officer Jenkins, who happens to be on the lookout for a pair of lady crooks named "Pickpocket Pearl" and "Sticky Fingers Sal." ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Lucy's Showbiz Swan Song
    Despite her impending motherhood, Lucy (Lucille Ball) is determined to participate in the "Gay Nineties Revue" being staged by Ricky (Desi Arnaz). The highlight of the revue is to be a barbershop quartet, consisting of Ricky, Ethel (Vivian Vance), Fred (William Frawley) -- and some guy named George Watson. Despite her questionable (to say the least) singing skills, Lucy manages to wangle a spot in the quartet, with uproarious results. Also appearing in this episode is Pepito the Clown (aka Pepito Pérez), who had guest-starred in the original I Love Lucy pilot film back in 1950, and had staged many of the comedy routines in Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz' pre-TV comedy act. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: The Indian Show
    The burdens of motherhood have not dampened Lucy's desire to break into show business. Indeed, when Ricky (Desi Arnaz) announces that he is staging a new "Indian Show" at the Tropicana, Lucy (Lucille Ball) not only assumes that she will be the star of the proceedings, but also begins diligently researching the history of Native Americans (courtesy of pulp novels!). Alas, Ricky has no interest in hiring Lucy, though he does find roles for the Mertzes. Never one to give up after the first try, Lucy manages to insinuate herself into a lavish floor-show number, "Waters of the Minnetonka" -- and even figures out a way to care for Little Ricky at the same time. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Sales Resistance
    With Lucy (Lucille Ball) still in the hospital with her new baby boy, Ricky Jr., the Ricardos and the Mertzes reminisce to an earlier incident which illustrates Lucy's lack of sales resistance. (This episode was filmed before the birth of Lucy's baby, but telecast after the big event.) It seems that our heroine once went on a buying spree in which she was talked into buying hundreds of dollars of attractive but useless merchandise from the "Handy Dandy" company. Ordered to return the items, Lucy is terrified that slick salesman Harry Martin (Sheldon Leonard) will fast-talk her into buying even more stuff, so she tries to palm off what she has already purchased on her next-door neighbor (Verna Felton) -- a "hard sell" if there ever was one. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Lucy Is Matchmaker
    Hal March, best known in the 1950s as the host of such TV game shows as The $64,000 Question, appears in this episode as Eddie Grant, an unmarried friend of Fred and Ethel Mertz (William Frawley, Vivian Vance). Bitten by the matchmaking bug, Lucy (Lucille Ball) decides that Eddie would make a perfect husband for her single friend Sylvia Collins. To fully appreciate the hilarious cascade of misunderstandings that ensue, it is important to know that Eddie Grant makes his living as a lingerie salesman.... ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Lucy Wants New Furniture
    Now that the Ricardos are living in a new apartment, Lucy (Lucille Ball) figures that it's time to replace the old living room furniture. Without the permission or knowledge of husband Ricky (Desi Arnaz), Lucy purchases a new sofa and coffee table, using the old furniture as down payment for the 299-dollar price tag. The trick now is to prevent Ricky from finding out about the transaction until Lucy can figure out the "right time" to tell him -- and the way things are going, the "right time" may well be 1963! Somehow or other, this situation segues into an even funnier one, wherein Lucy tries to curb her financial "'stravagances" by making her own dress and giving herself a home permanent. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Redecorating the Mertzes' Apartment
    In her efforts to help Fred (William Frawley) and Ethel (Vivian Vance) redecorate their apartment, Lucy (Lucille Ball) inadvertently destroys their furniture. Naturally, this forces Lucy to make amends -- which she does, in her own inimitable fashion. I Love Lucy fans have a special place in their hearts for this episode, inasmuch as Lucille Ball, a notorious perfectionist, accidentally makes a slip in her dialogue delivery (whereupon Desi Arnaz brilliantly "covers" for her on the spot!). ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: The Million Dollar Idea
    In their never-ending efforts to strike it rich, Lucy (Lucille Ball) and Ethel (Vivian Vance) go into the homemade-salad business. Hawking their wares on a live TV commercial, the girls are delighted when they receive thousands of orders. But their delight turns to dismay when Lucy and Ethel realize that the cost of manufacturing and packaging "Aunt Martha's Old-Fashioned Salad Dressing" far outdistances any potential profits. The solution? Do another TV commercial -- this one designed to convince the public that the girls' salad dressing is the worst product on the face of the earth. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Lucy Has Her Eyes Examined
    Hoping to audition for an upcoming movie musical, Lucy (Lucille Ball) practices an energetic jitterbug number with professional dancer Arthur "King Cat" Walsh. The rehearsal gives Ricky (Desi Arnaz) a splitting headache, necessitating a visit to the eye doctor (Shepard Menken). The trouble begins when the doctor decides that Lucy is the one who needs treatment. Thus, he applies eyedrops that temporarily blur Lucy's vision -- just when she is poised to audition with Ricky, Fred (William Frawley), and Ethel (Vivian Vance) in an elaborate "Varsity Drag" routine. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: The French Revue
    Ricky (Desi Arnaz) is staging a French-themed musical revue at the Tropicana club. Hoping to appear in the revue, Lucy (Lucille Ball) and Ethel (Vivian Vance) hire waiter Robert DuBois (Alberto Morin) to give them French language lessons -- and in exchange, DuBois will be allowed to sing "Louise" at Ricky's club. While Ricky is delighted to include DuBois in the act, he expressly forbids Lucy to participate in the revue -- which of course means that not only will Lucy show up at the Tropicana, but she will also steal the show. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Ricky's Old Girlfriend
    When Lucy (Lucille Ball) rattles off the names of her former boyfriends, Ricky (Desi Arnaz) decides to make her jealous by inventing an old girlfriend of his own, whom he names "Carlota Romero." Problem is, a Cuban-born singer Carlota Romero (Rosa Turich) is at that moment appearing in a New York nightclub. Convinced that Ricky's old flame has returned to take him away, Lucy decides to confront Carlota on her own -- and there's a big surprise in store for both Mr. and Mrs. Ricardo. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Lucy Hires a Maid
    Overwhelmed by the responsibilities of motherhood, Lucy (Lucille Ball) decides to hire a maid named Mrs. Porter (Verna Felton). In preparation for her new servant's arrival, Lucy meticulously prepares a list of do's and don'ts to help Mrs. Porter perform her job more efficiently. Imagine our heroine's surprise when Mrs. Porter imperiously descends upon the Ricardo household with her own list of what she expects Lucy to do -- and not do. And imagine Lucy's agony when she can't summon up the nerve to fire the overbearing maid, who within a few hours of her arrival has completely taken over the Ricardo household. This episode marks the first appearance of twin infants Richard Lee Simmons and Ronald Lee Simmons as Little Ricky. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Lucy Changes Her Mind
    After a riotous night on the town in which Lucy (Lucille Ball) drives a waiter (Frank Nelson) into a frenzy over her indecision as to what she wants for dinner -- or even which table she wants to sit at -- Ricky (Desi Arnaz) accuses his wife of being constitutionally incapable of making up her mind. He further insists that she has never finished anything she has ever started. Hoping to get even, Lucy digs up an unfinished love letter from her old beau Tom Henderson and adds a few "finishing touches," which she is convinced will arouse Ricky's jealousy. Unfortunately for Lucy, Ricky has been tipped off to her little scheme...and the plot rolls merrily onward to a sidesplitting climax wherein Lucy outrageously "flirts" with a department-store mannequin. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: The Girls Go Into Business
    Once again dreaming of unlimited wealth, Lucy (Lucille Ball) and Ethel (Vivian Vance) allow themselves to be bamboozled into buying Hansen's Dress Shop. The crafty owner of the shop (Mabel Paige) has convinced the girls that they have purchased a gold mine at a bargain price, but before long Lucy and Ethel realize that their "new" emporium -- which they rename three times in a single day -- is a financial bust. Thus, when a gentleman offers the girls three times what they paid for Hansen's to buy it away from them, they jump at the chance...and, as usual, our heroines have leaped before they looked. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: No Children Allowed
    Elizabeth Patterson makes her first series appearance as Mrs. Trumbull, the Ricardos' elderly, cranky neighbor. Disturbed by Little Ricky's constant crying, Mrs. Trumbull invokes the "no children" clause in the apartment house's lease and demands that landlady Ethel (Vivian Vance) evict the Ricardos immediately -- adding that if this doesn't happen, Mrs. Trumbull and all the other tenants will themselves move out. Refusing to kowtow to this threat, Ethel loyally stands by her pal Lucy (Lucille Ball): "My friendship with the Ricardos means more to me than all the money in the world!" Well and good -- but then Ethel proceeds to repeat the story of her loyalty, over and over and over again, to anyone who will listen (and a few who won't!). Ultimately, Lucy gets fed up with Ethel's "nobility" and tells her off -- whereupon World War III erupts between the Ricardos and the Mertzes. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Changing the Boys' Wardrobe
    Lucy (Lucille Ball) and Ethel (Vivian Vance) are none too thrilled that Ricky (Desi Arnaz) and Fred (William Frawley) insist upon wearing their oldest and rattiest clothes in public. Without the boys' knowledge, the girls sell the raggedy old duds to a secondhand store owned by Zeb Allen (Oliver Blake) -- who promptly calls Ricky, offering to sell back his clothes. Deciding to teach the girls a lesson for sneaking around behind their backs, Ricky and Fred stuff their old clothes into Brooks Brothers boxes, then announce that they have purchased expensive new clothing, and intend to wear their new outfits at the Tropicana Club. Need we add that the scheme backfires in the most embarrassing manner possible? ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: The Ricardos Change Apartments
    When a larger apartment becomes available in the building, Lucy (Lucille Ball) decides it is time to increase the Ricardos' living space -- for the sake of Little Ricky, of course. Naturally, Big Ricky (Desi Arnaz) is opposed to moving, especially after learning that the new apartment would cost an additional 20 dollars per month. Undaunted, Lucy stages an elaborate ruse to fool Ricky into thinking that their present apartment is only slightly more cramped than your average hall closet. But the fun really begins when Lucy and Ethel (Vivian Vance) decide to avoid additional expenses by handling the moving chores themselves. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Equal Rights
    Lucy (Lucille Ball) and Ethel (Vivian Vance) demand that their husbands, Ricky (Desi Arnaz) and Fred (William Frawley), treat them as equals. The boys decide to teach the girls a lesson by taking them out to an expensive restaurant -- and then leaving them with the bill. Also in on the scheme is the restaurant's maître d' (Larry Dobkin), who orders Lucy and Ethel to work off their bill by washing dishes. Now it is Lucy and Ethel's turn to get even, which they do by concocting a scheme whereby Ricky and Fred will be persuaded that the restaurant is being robbed. Predictably, nothing goes quite as planned, and the evening ends with two of the main characters behind bars. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Baby Pictures
    The Ricardos engage in a "battle of the brags" with their friends the Applebys, with each couple dragging out pictures of their respective children at the slightest provocation. While the war continues to rage between Lucy (Lucille Ball) and Caroline Appleby (Doris Singleton), Ricky (Desi Arnaz) tries to negotiate a separate peace, so as not to jeopardize his upcoming appearance on Charlie Appleby's (Hy Averback) TV station. But Lucy is not about to admit that her Little Ricky could in any way, shape, or form be less bright or adorable than Caroline's Little Stevie. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Lucy's Last Birthday
    More sensitive than usual -- if such a thing is possible -- Lucy (Lucille Ball) becomes convinced that everyone has forgotten her birthday. Wandering disconsolately into Central Park, lonely Lucy is "adopted" by a lachrymose benevolent group called The Friends of the Friendless. With her new comrades in tow, Lucy angrily storms into the Tropicana to tell Ricky (Desi Arnaz) off for his negligence -- only to get the surprise of her life (which, by her count, has lasted a mere 29 years!). This is the one and only episode in which Desi Arnaz sings the I Love Lucy theme song, with special lyrics written for the occasion by Harold Adamson. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Pregnant Women Are Unpredictable
    Now that she is going to be a mother, Lucy (Lucille Ball) must choose an appropriate name for her baby -- something "unique" and "euphonious," words that baffle her Cuban-born husband, Ricky (Desi Arnaz). Somehow this situation leads to Lucy concluding that Ricky is interested only in the baby and not in her. As one complication piles upon another, dizzy Lucy reaches yet another conclusion: Ricky loves her but has already grown to hate the baby! ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: The Inferiority Complex
    Lucy (Lucille Ball) develops an inferiority complex when she can't get anyone to laugh at her jokes -- in fact, the harder she tries to be funny, the worse things get. Plunging into a deep blue funk, Lucy becomes incapable of performing even the simplest task, whereupon she tearfully decides to remain in bed for the rest of her life. Hoping to snap his wife out of her doldrums, Ricky (Desi Arnaz) hires a "physio-chiatrist" named Dr. Molin (Gerald Mohr), who prescribes a few doses of flattery to cheer Lucy up. Unfortunately, Molin's treatment also includes an elaborate charade in which he poses as a handsome bachelor intent upon wooing Lucy away from Ricky. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: The Camping Trip
    Lucy (Lucille Ball) and Ethel (Vivian Vance) want to share their husbands' interests, so they insist upon going on a camping trip with Ricky (Desi Arnaz) and Fred (William Frawley). Hoping to discourage the girls from intruding upon their recreational pursuits, the boys cook up a scheme whereby Ricky will take Lucy on a weekend "trial run," making sure that everything goes wrong and that Lucy will be run ragged by her experience in the great outdoors. Ah, but Ricky has not reckoned with the resourceful of his redheaded spouse -- nor had he counted upon Ethel to silent assist Lucy in proving her salt as a true camper. (Watch out for that "wild duck"!) ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: The Club Election
    Filmed before the episode in which Lucy (Lucille Ball) gives birth to Little Ricky, "The Club Election" is staged in the form of a flashback, as Ethel (Vivian Vance) recalls the time that she and Lucy ran against each other for the presidency of the Wednesday Afternoon Fine Arts League. The situation reaches its farcical nirvana when both Lucy and Ethel fall over each other trying to woo the deciding vote from new club member Mrs. Knickerbocker (played by the irreplaceable Ida Moore). Doris Singleton, best known for her recurring I Love Lucy role as Caroline Appleby, is here cast as a clubwoman named Lillian...Lillian Appleby. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Lucy and Ethel Buy the Same Dress
    The women's club to which Lucy (Lucille Ball) and Ethel (Vivian Vance) belong manages to wangle an appearance on a local TV station. Inveigled into hosting the club's variety show, Ricky (Desi Arnaz) goes so far as to rehearse Lucy and Ethel in their big number, a rousing rendition of Cole Porter's "Friendship." Alas, the title of the song proves woefully inappropriate when, unbeknownst to one another, Lucy and Ethel buy identical dresses for their TV appearance. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: The Charm School
    Lucy (Lucille Ball) and Ethel (Vivian Vance) are considerably put out when Ricky (Desi Arnaz) and Fred (William Frawley) become entranced by a beautiful, cultured young woman named Eve (Eve Whitney). Hoping to recapture their husbands' attentions, the girls enroll in a charm school run by Phoebe Emerson (played by Natalie Schafer, aka Lovey Howell on Gilligan's Island). When Lucy and Ethel appear before their husbands in their new, "cultured" wardrobe, the boys are so taken aback that they don "special" clothes of their own -- not to keep up with their wives, but to show them how silly they are to put on hoity-toity airs. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Bonus Bucks
    When Ricky (Desi Arnaz) discovers that he holds the "bonus buck" sought after in a radio contest, he generously plants the dollar bill (worth 300 dollars) in Lucy's purse, anticipating the thrill when Lucy (Lucille Ball) finds it. Unfortunately, Lucy uses the bill to pay the grocery boy (Don Garner) -- who in turn passes the bonus buck along to Ethel (Vivian Vance) as change. A battle over possession ensues, leading to the bill being torn in half, with the Ricardos and the Mertzes intending to share the prize (or at least that's what the couples tell each other!) One thing leads to another, and by episode's end, Lucy's half of the bill ends up at the local laundry, where in her zeal to retrieve the dollar Lucy is given the "starch treatment" to end all starch treatments. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Lucy Is Envious
    Jealous Lucy (Lucille Ball) wants to one-up her wealthy former schoolmate Cynthia Harcourt (Mary Jane Croft) by making a large financial pledge to charity. Unfortunately, she doesn't realize how large her pledge really is until the money comes due ("Put me down for five," she said magnanimously -- whereupon she was put down for five hundred!). Desperate to cover the pledge, Lucy and Ethel (Vivian Vance) take jobs promoting the upcoming movie "Women From Mars" -- said promotion requiring the girls to dress as Martians and "invade" the observation deck of the Empire State Building. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Ricky's Screen Test
    Ricky (Desi Arnaz) is anxiously preparing for the screen test that may land him the starring role in MGM's lavish musical version of "Don Juan." Likewise anxious is Lucy (Lucille Ball), who has arranged to feed Ricky his lines while the camera is rolling. Although she herself is not supposed to appear in the text (except for the back of her head), Lucy is determined to prove her star quality by maneuvering herself into close-up range -- and not even being tied to a chair will stop her. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: The Golf Game
    Professional golfer Jimmy Demaret appears in this episode, in which Ricky (Desi Arnaz) and Fred (William Frawley) conspire to discourage Lucy (Lucille Ball) and Ethel (Vivian Vance) from joining them on the golf links. The boys' plan is to cook up a long and impossible-to-follow set of rules for the game of golf, guaranteed to drive the girls to distraction and frustration. When Jimmy Demaret tumbles to the scheme, he agrees to help Lucy and Ethel turn the tables on their prankish husbands. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: The Black Wig
    Lucy (Lucille Ball) tries to find out if Ricky (Desi Arnaz) is faithful by donning a black wig and passing herself off as a sexy senorita. Ricky, however, is wise to her scheme, and decides to teach her a lesson by pretending to succumb to the seductions of the "mysterious brunette." Before the situation has played itself out, both Lucy and Ethel (Vivian Vance) have donned quite a few ludicrous disguises! The plot of this episode vaguely resembles the 1940 B-movie You Can't Fool Your Wife -- which also stars Lucille Ball. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Ricky's Contract
    For the past two weeks, Ricky (Desi Arnaz) has been glued to the living room telephone, anxiously awaiting word as to whether or not he has landed the starring role in MGM's musical version of "Don Juan." During a period in which Ricky is forced to leave the house, a daydreaming Fred (William Frawley) scrawls the message "Hollywood called. You got the job," figuring that this is just what Ricky would like to hear. Of course, Fred intends to destroy the message, but distractions occur and the note lands in the hands of Lucy (Lucille Ball). Jumping to the obvious conclusion, Lucy excitedly passes the "news" on to one of Ricky's associates -- then must figure out a way to let Ricky down easy (and avoid bloodshed!) when the truth is revealed. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Getting Ready
    Now that Ricky (Desi Arnaz) has been signed to star in a movie-musical version of "Don Juan," the Ricardos begin making preparations for their big trip to Hollywood. After applying some gentle coercion, the Mertzes are invited to go along for the ride, with Ricky handling their expenses. Only one problem remains: Lucy (Lucille Ball) and Ricky have elected to travel to Hollywood by car -- but neither the Ricardos nor the Mertzes own a car. By the time the episode is over, Ricky has nearly exceeded his trip expense before he has even left New York. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Lucy Cries Wolf
    Hoping to prove Ricky's loyalty after reading a newspaper story about a woman who was robbed and tied up while her husband ignored her pleas for help, Lucy (Lucille Ball) pretends to be kidnapped. Actually, she's safely perched on the ledge outside her apartment window -- and that is where she is spotted by next-door neighbor Mrs. DeVries (Beppie DeVries). Upon being informed that Lucy is crying wolf, Ricky (Desi Arnaz), Fred (William Frawley), and Ethel (Vivian Vance) decide to teach her a lesson by flippantly discussing her as if she were already dead and buried. But the real lesson comes at the end of the episode, when Lucy is actually waylaid by a pair of masked burglars -- and no one will believe her story. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Tennessee Ernie Visits
    In a strategy designed to boost the slightly flagging ratings of I Love Lucy, the series offered its first two-part story, built around the talents of guest star Tennessee Ernie Ford. In part one, the Ricardos extend their hospitality to a cousin of a friend of Lucy's mother, a bucolic fellow named Ernie who hails from Bent Fork, TN. Though Ernie is friendly and likeable, he soon becomes quite a pest, especially when he insists upon singing early in the morning and waking up the entire apartment building. To get rid of Ernie, Lucy (Lucille Ball) tries to scare him off by disguising herself as one of those "wicked city wimmen" that Ernie's mother has warned him about. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Fan Magazine Interview
    When a fan magazine decides to write an article on "average day" in the life of Ricky Ricardo (Desi Arnaz), Ricky's wife, Lucy (Lucille Ball), and their friends Fred (William Frawley) and Ethel (Vivian Vance) insist upon creating a good (read: false) impression by dressing to the nines and putting on airs. The situation deteriorates when, as part of a publicity stunt tied in with the article, Ricky mails out thousands of cards to the women on the Tropicana's mailing list, promising a "special dance" to each of them if they show up at the club. Jumping to the wrong conclusion, Lucy decides to track down one of the invitees, a woman named Minnie Finch (played by Kathryn Card, before she was established in the recurring role of Lucy's mother, Mrs. McGillicuddy). ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: The Business Manager
    In the first episode of I Love Lucy's fourth season, Ricky (Desi Arnaz) hires a business manager named Hickox (Charles Lane) to get Lucy's household budget in order (for the first time in 13 years!). When the penny-pinching Hickox allots Lucy (Lucille Ball) a mere five dollars spending money for the next month, she begins cooking up schemes to earn some quick cash. The main plan is to purchase groceries for her neighbors, overcharging them to a credit account that Hickox has set up for the Ricardos, and keeping the spare cash. Misreading a grocery order stating "buy can All Pet," Ricky assumes that Lucy's sudden financial windfall is the result of stock-market speculation -- and he wants a piece of the action. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Lucy's Mother-in-Law
    Mary Emery makes the first of two I Love Lucy appearances as the Cuban-born mother of bandleader Ricky Ricardo (Desi Arnaz). Hoping to make Mama Ricardo feel at home, Lucy (Lucille Ball) manages to do everything wrong, albeit in her own unique and hilarious fashion. The high point comes when Lucy, anxious to make a good impression on Mama Ricardo by conversing with her in her native tongue, arranges to have a professional mind reader (Fortunio Bonanova) feed her some Spanish phrases via a network of tiny microphones -- only to be left literally speechless when the mind reader is forced to desert his post ahead of schedule. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Sentimental Anniversary
    It's the Ricardos' 13th wedding anniversary, and Lucy (Lucille Ball) and Ricky (Desi Arnaz) are looking forward to celebrating the occasion with a quite, intimate evening -- complete with champagne and candlelight -- at home. But Fred (William Frawley) and Ethel (Vivian Vance) have other ideas: they want to honor their neighbors' anniversary with an elaborate (and noisy) surprise party. Appearing as one of the partygoers is Lucille Ball's lifelong friend Barbara Pepper, best known for her portrayal of Doris Ziffel on Green Acres. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: The Matchmaker
    Once again, Lucy (Lucille Ball) decides to play matchmaker. This time her victims are middle-aged bachelor and bachelorette Sam Carter (Milton Frome) and Dorothy Cooke (Sarah Selby). Determined to demonstrate the joys of married life, Lucy uses her own "blissful" relationship with Ricky (Desi Arnaz) and Little Ricky as an example. Unfortunately, things go terribly awry as Lucy tries to entertain Sam and Dorothy in her home, with neither her husband nor her son in any mood to cooperate. The evening turns into an unmitigated disaster -- to which Sam and Dorothy react in an entirely unanticipated fashion. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Home Movies
    Offended when the Mertzes express boredom while watching his home movies, Ricky (Desi Arnaz) huffily declares that he'll never force them to watch anything of his again -- not even the TV pilot he is going to star in. Teaming up with Lucy (Lucille Ball), Ethel (Vivian Vance) and Fred (William Frawley) decide to prove to Ricky that it is indeed possible to make an entertaining home movie...though the results, an epic "Western musical drama," are hardly up to Academy Award standards. Unfortunately, this amateur production is spliced into Ricky's pilot film, just as TV producer Bennett Green (Stanley Farrar) shows up to assess Ricky's potential as a video star. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Ricky's Movie Offer
    One of the most famous of all I Love Lucy story arcs gets under way when a Hollywood talent scout (Frank Nelson) arrives at the Ricardo home to discuss a possible screen test for Ricky (Desi Arnaz). It seems that MGM is planning a musical version of "Don Juan," and Ricky would seem to be a natural choice for the role. Naturally, everyone wants to get into the act, and before long Fred (William Frawley) and Ethel (Vivian Vance) are parading around in Spanish costumes, Lucy (Lucille Ball) dolls herself up to look like Marilyn Monroe, and even old Mrs. Trumbull (Elizabeth Patterson) lifts her voice in song. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Lucy's Club Dance
    As part of a fund-raising strategy, the women's club to which Lucy (Lucille Ball) and Ethel (Vivian Vance) belong decides to organize an all-woman orchestra. At first, the musically disinclined Lucy is rejected by the orchestra, but she wangles a spot as a saxophonist by promising to arrange for the aggregation to be led by her husband, Ricky (Desi Arnaz). Alas, none of the ladies has anything remotely resembling talent, so it is up to Ricky to save the day -- and his reputation as a bona fide bandleader -- when the all-girl orchestra is booked for a professional engagement. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Oil Wells
    A wealthy Texan named Sam Johnson (Harry Cheshire) offers to sell the Ricardos and the Mertzes some of his leftover oil stock. Suspecting that the stock isn't a valuable as it's cracked up to be, both Ricky (Desi Arnaz) and Fred (William Frawley) take a pass -- or at least, that's what they tell each other! Inevitably, both of the couples invest heavily in Johnson's oil wells, leading to another session of conclusion-jumping on the part of Lucy (Lucille Ball), who sets up her own "sting" operation to find out if Johnson is on the up-and-up. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: The Diner
    When Ricky (Desi Arnaz) decides to get out of show business and into another line of work, Lucy (Lucille Ball) and the Mertzes (Vivian Vance, William Frawley) go along with the plan. The two couples invest heavily in a local diner called "Bill's Place," which the owner, Mr. Wilson (James Burke), has assured them is a gold mine. Suffice to say that not only is the diner a bottomless money pit, but the Ricardos and the Mertzes are run ragged trying to handle all the work themselves -- and worse still, an argument results in the couples splitting the diner down the middle into two equally unprofitable eateries. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Ricky Minds the Baby
    When Lucy (Lucille Ball) complains that Ricky (Desi Arnaz) is too busy to spend any time with their son, Ricky magnanimously rearranges his vacation so he can devote all his attention to Little Ricky. Unfortunately, Ricky and Fred (William Frawley) become so engrossed in a TV football game that they fail to notice when Little Ricky decides to go for a little walk in the hallway. Lucy (Lucille Ball) decides to teach Ricky a lesson for his negligence...and further elaborations on the plot are surely unnecessary. The episode's highlight occurs when Ricky regales his son with a retelling of Little Red Riding Hood -- in Spanish. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Mertz and Kurtz
    Veteran showman Charles Winninger appears in this episode as Barney Kurtz, the former vaudeville partner of Fred Mertz (William Frawley). When Barney comes to visit full of grandiose tales of performing before "the crowned heads of Europe," Fred tries to impress his ex-partner by pretending to be rolling in dough, and Lucy (Lucille Ball) goes along with the gag by posing as the Mertzes' maid. It soon develops that Barney is in far worse shape financially than Fred -- and worse, he has been forced to quit showbiz to work as a fry cook. To make sure that Barney will remain a hero in the eyes of his impressionable grandson Barney Jr. (Stephen Wootton), Lucy, Fred, Ricky (Desi Arnaz), and Ethel (Vivian Vance) help the old trouper stage his comeback as part of an elaborate vaudeville show at the Tropicana. Highlights include Desi Arnaz' deathless rendition of the old standard "They Go Wild, Simply Wild Over Me." ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Ethel's Birthday
    Fred (William Frawley) asks Lucy (Lucille Ball) to pick out an appropriate gift for his wife Ethel's birthday. Alas, Ethel (Vivian Vance) is disappointed by the selection, leading to a bitter quarrel with Lucy. Hoping to repair the girls' shattered friendship, Fred and Ricky (William Frawley) attempt to trick Lucy and Ethel into sitting in adjoining seats at a Broadway show. The scheme works -- and the ensuing Niagara of tears threatens to drown out the performers on-stage. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Ricky's Hawaiian Vacation
    When Ricky (Desi Arnaz) insists that he hasn't the money for a Hawaiian vacation, Lucy endeavors to win a free trip by submitting the story of her "miserable" life to a Strike It Rich-style game show called "Be a Good Neighbor." She even goes so far as to claim that she doesn't want the vacation for herself, but for the "impoverished" Mertzes and their elderly, grey-haired mother (actually Lucy in disguise). Figuring out what Lucy is up to, the show's prankish host Freddie Fillmore (Frank Nelson) conspires with Ricky to teach our heroine a lesson by subjecting her to all manner of on-camera pranks and practical jokes, leaving her soaking wet and splattered with eggs and pastry. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Tennessee Ernie Hangs On
    In the conclusion of a two-part story, the Ricardos are at their wits' end trying to figure out some way to get rid of their troublesome hillbilly house guest, Cousin Ernie (Tennessee Ernie Ford). After several misfired schemes, Lucy (Lucille Ball) conspires with Ricky (Desi Arnaz), Fred (William Frawley), and Ethel (Vivian Vance) to convince Ernie that the Ricardos have gone broke and can no longer afford to feed him. But generous Ernie decides to help out his hosts -- and the Mertzes -- by dressing them up as rubes and wangling a musical guest spot on "Millikan's Chicken Mash Hour," a TV show hosted by another of Ernie's unlimited supply of city cousins! ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Ricky Loses His Temper
    When Ricky (Desi Arnaz) blows his top after Lucy (Lucille Ball) purchases a new hat, Lucy bets him that he cannot hold his temper until she purchases another hat. Naturally, Lucy indulges in a variety of schemes to force Ricky into a tantrum so that she can win the bet -- she has her heart set on a new turquoise chapeau studded with pearls -- but Ricky refuses to bite. The situation is resolved (in a manner of speaking) by the timely arrival of a ventriloquist, played by veteran B-Western sidekick Max Terhune. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Lucy Writes a Novel
    Lucy (Lucille Ball) takes it upon herself to write a novel titled "Real Gone With the Wind." Ricky (Desi Arnaz), Fred (William Frawley), and Ethel (Vivian Vance) are none too pleased to find that Lucy has based her main characters on them ("Nicky Nicardo," "Ethel Nurtz," etc.), and they try to burn the manuscript, to no avail. Then, much to everyone's amazement, a publisher evinces interest in Lucy's masterpiece -- or at least that's how it seems to the euphoric Lucy. However, as often happens on this show, things don't quite turn out as expected. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: The Sublease
    Intending to spend their summer vacation in Maine, where Ricky (Desi Arnaz) and his band have been booked into a lodge engagement, the Ricardos sublet their apartment to Mr. Beecher (Jay Novello), a nervous chap who has a phobia about loud noises. Unfortunately, the Maine gig falls through, and the Ricardos return home, only to find that Mr. Beecher refuses to leave. After a disastrous attempt to move in with Fred (William Frawley) and Ethel (Vivian Vance), Lucy (Lucille Ball) comes up with a plan to force Mr. Beecher to vacate -- and did we mention that Mr. Beecher has a phobia about loud noises? This was the final episode of I Love Lucy's third season. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: The Hedda Hopper Story
    Charlie Pomerantz (Hy Averback), press agent for Ricky Ricardo (Desi Arnaz), arranges a publicity stunt whereby Ricky will "rescue" a supposedly drowning woman from the pool of the Beverly Palms Hotel. This act of courage is sure to win Ricky a mention in the newspaper column of influential gossip diva Hedda Hopper. Chosen to appear as the "drowning victim," Lucy (Lucille Ball) keeps a sharp eye peeled for Hedda's arrival at the pool, making certain to look for the woman wearing the most outrageous hat. Alas, the stunt proves to be a bust -- until Lucy's mother, Mrs. McGillicuddy (Kathryn Card), of all people, saves the day. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: L.A. at Last!
    No synopsis available.

    I Love Lucy: In Palm Springs
    Rock Hudson makes a rare pre-McMillan and Wife TV appearance in this episode, in which Lucy (Lucille Ball) and Ethel (Vivian Vance) take a trip to Palm Springs without Ricky (Desi Arnaz) and Fred (William Frawley). This is part of a strategy to avoid the "boredom" of too much marital togetherness, but before long the girls are yearning to be reunited with their husbands -- and vice versa. Of course, Lucy and Ethel could never admit that they were wrong to take a trip alone, nor are Ricky and Fred willing to admit that they're lonely. It takes the timely arrival of movie star Rock Hudson for the boys and the girls to get back together again with a minimum of muss and fuss. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: The Dancing Star
    Lucy's friend Caroline Appleby (Doris Singleton) arrives in Hollywood, demanding to meet some of the celebrities with whom Lucy has claimed to be so chummy. First on Caroline's list is Van Johnson, whom, of course, Lucy has never met. Our heroine manages to get herself into a hole by inviting Caroline to watch a rehearsal of a dance act that Lucy and Johnson are purportedly performing at the Beverly Palms Hotel nightclub, taking advantage of the fact that the nearsighted Caroline has lost her glasses and won't be able to see anything. When the glasses are located, a desperate Lucy begs Johnson to bail her out -- and the result is an astonishing display of the terpsichorean skills of both Van Johnson and Lucille Ball, to the accompaniment of the old standard "How About You." ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Hollywood Anniversary
    Although Ricky (Desi Arnaz) cannot remember the exact date of his 15th wedding anniversary, he hopes to mollify Lucy (Lucille Ball) by arranging a gala anniversary party at the Mocambo nightclub. Unfortunately, Lucy at the moment is very, very angry with Ricky over his faulty memory, and refuses to accompany him to the Mocambo; instead, she chooses Bobby (Bob Jellison), the bellboy at the Beverly Palms Hotel, as her escort. Believe it or not, this episode was based on an actual event in the lives of stars Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: The Star Upstairs
    Ever on the prowl for Hollywood celebrities, Lucy (Lucille Ball) is thrilled to discover that movie star Cornel Wilde has rented the penthouse suite just above the Ricardos' Beverly Hills hotel room. Determined to catch a closeup glimpse of Wilde, Lucy first disguises herself as a bellboy, then hides under a luncheon cart that is wheeled into the actor's room. As expected, things go awry, and Lucy ends up trying to use a "rope" of blankets to escape from Wilde's high-rise terrace! ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Don Juan Is Shelved
    Ricky (Desi Arnaz) plunges into a deep depression when he learns that MGM plans to shelve his upcoming debut film, "Don Juan." Hoping to save Ricky's movie career, Lucy (Lucille Ball), Fred (William Frawley), and Ethel (Vivian Vance) concoct all manner of wacky schemes. When these fail, Lucy hires a actor to pose as a big-time movie producer who will make Ricky a fabulous film offer in the presence of MGM's CEO, Dore Schary. Unfortunately, the actor she hires happens to be Dore Schary himself! (Ironically, the real Dore Schary was to have appeared in this episode, but at the last moment developed a case of stage fright; he was replaced by Philip Ober, who at that time was the husband of I Love Lucy co-star Vivian Vance.) ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Bull Fight Dance
    In order to wangle an appearance in a TV fundraiser hosted by her husband, Ricky (Desi Arnaz), Lucy (Lucille Ball) resorts to a little unsubtle extortion, threatening to sabotage Ricky's upcoming "Photoplay" magazine article unless she is allowed to perform. After several misfire rehearsals, Ricky finally finds the "perfect" role for Lucy: as the bull (in full costume) in a "matador" dance. Lucy agrees to the dance but not the costume...and on the night of a telecast, "bullfighter" Ricky finds himself face to face with a very benign-looking cow (and guess who's playing the other end of the cow?). ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Lucy Learns to Drive
    Now that Ricky (Desi Arnaz) has purchased a car for their trip to Hollywood (yes, it's the famous 1955 Pontiac convertible that has shown up in so many TV retrospectives), Lucy (Lucille Ball) insists upon learning to drive. Reluctantly, Ricky agrees to teach her, but then reneges on the deal after Lucy tries to make a U-turn in the Holland Tunnel! This doesn't stop Lucy from passing on what little she knows about driving to Ethel (Vivian Vance), resulting in not one but two crackups. But that's not the worst of it: Lucy has forgotten to purchase an insurance policy for the new car. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: First Stop
    After the first, long day of their road trip from New York to Hollywood, the Ricardos and the Mertzes pull into the greasy-spoon diner owned by one George Skinner (Olin Howlin). Suffering through a miserable and (for 1955!) very expensive meal, the two couples resume their trip -- only to be misled by a series of confusing road signs, ending up at a rundown motel...also owned by one George Skinner. As the night segues into day, it becomes painfully clear to the travelers that they'll never escape the clutches of the enterprising (and aptly named) George Skinner unless they're willing to open their pocketbooks -- very wide. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Don Juan and the Starlets
    To promote the upcoming production of "Don Juan," The studio arranges for Ricky (Desi Arnaz) to appear in some publicity photographs, in which he is surrounded by a bevy of gorgeous starlets. Lucy (Lucille Ball), of course, is quite upset by this turn of events, and even more so when Ricky is required to attend a movie premiere with those selfsame starlets. When Ricky fails to return home from the premiere, Lucy jumps to the conclusion that he has left her in favor of one of the younger women -- and the mess isn't straightened out until the very end of the episode. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Lucy and the Dummy
    When Ricky (Desi Arnaz) takes a pass on performing at an MGM studio party, Lucy (Lucille Ball) cooks up a scheme to attend the affair herself, using a life-size rubber dummy ("Raggedy Ricky") as her partner in a dance act. Unfortunately, the dummy gets stuck on Lucy's Spanish dress, and refuses to "leave" when she wants it to. As a result of this public spectacle, Lucy is offered a one-year contract to star in MGM comedies -- but is she psychologically ready for all of her showbiz dreams to come true? ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: The Great Train Robbery
    No sooner have the Ricardos and the Mertzes boarded the Union Pacific Domeliner train for New York than Lucy (Lucille Ball) has accidentally pulled the emergency brake -- and rest assured, it isn't for the last time in this episode. As for the plot, Lucy becomes convinced that a traveling jewelry salesman (Lou Krugman) and a detective (Joseph Crehan) are a pair of crooks, and that a genuine jewel thief (Harry Bartell) is an FBI agent! In the course of events, Fred (William Frawley) and Ethel (Vivian Vance) are splattered with mashed potatoes -- no fewer than three times. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Ricky Sells the Car
    Preparing for the return trip from Hollywood to New York, Ricky (Desi Arnaz) sells his car for a profit and elects to make the eastward journey by train. Entrusted with the purchase of the train tickets, Lucy (Lucille Ball) accidentally buys only three from the ticketmaster -- meaning that either she, Ricky, Fred (William Frawley), or Ethel (Vivian Vance) will have to arrange for another mode of transportation. Without revealing any further plot details, it can be noted that this is the episode in which Fred and Ethyl roar into view aside a WWI-vintage Harley-Davidson motorcycle! ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Ricky Needs an Agent
    With her husband, Ricky (Desi Arnaz), between pictures, Lucy (Lucille Ball) disguises herself as Ricky's high-pressure agent "Lucille McGillicuddy," then storms the offices of MGM, demanding that the studio arrange a movie appearance for her "client." In her misguided zeal, Lucy insists that virtually every big-time producer in Hollywood and New York is clamoring for Ricky's services, and that MGM better act fast or they'll lose their star. Alas, the scheme blows up in Lucy's face when the MGM executives magnanimously release Ricky from his contract so that they won't impede his career! ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Ethel's Home Town
    On the last leg of their trip from New York to Hollywood, the Ricardos and the Mertzes pull into Albuquerque, the home town of Ethel Mertz (Vivian Vance). The four travelers are effusively welcomed by Ethel's father, Will Potter (Irving Bacon), who has arranged a gala reception for Alquerque's favorite daughter ("Ethel Mae Potter -- We Never Forget Her"). And why exactly is Ethel being feted as a celebrity? Well, it seems that she told a few -- er -- tall tales about having a spectacular show-business career to the editor of the "Albuquerque Chronicle." Hoping to teach Ethel a lesson, Lucy (Lucille Ball), Ricky (Desi Arnaz), and Fred (William Frawley) try to sabotage her command performance at the local little theater -- but she who laughs last laughs the loudest. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Tennessee Bound
    Still en route from New York to Hollywood, the Ricardos and the Mertzes are arrested for exceeding the speed limit of Bent Fork, TN. Luck of luck, this flyspeck community is the home of "Cousin" Ernie (Tennessee Ernie Ford), who'd been the house guest of Lucy (Lucille Ball) and Ricky (Desi Arnaz) during the previous season of I Love Lucy. Offering to help the travelers escape from jail, Cousin Ernie is himself nabbed by the sheriff (Will Wright), but he arranges for the Ricardos' and Mertzes' release by agreeing to marry the sheriff's inaptly named daughter Teensey (Marilyn Borden). Future TV producer Aaron Spelling (Beverly Hills 90210) shows up in a small part as a gas station attendant. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Ricky's European Booking
    In the first episode of a lengthy story arc, Ricky's band is booked on a European tour. Unfortunately, Ricky (Desi Arnaz) has only enough money for his musicians, and can't take Lucy (Lucille Ball) along. Unwilling to pass up her opportunity to visit Europe, Lucy sets about to raise the necessary funds by staging a raffle for what she calls "The Women's Overseas Aid." Trouble is, there's already a genuine "Women's Overseas Aid" -- and Lucy could go to prison for fraud. This episode includes a performance of the title song from the 1956 Lucille Ball-Desi Arnaz theatrical feature Forever Darling. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Lucy and John Wayne
    In the conclusion of a two-part story set in Hollywood, Ricky (Desi Arnaz) has managed to mollify the management of Grauman's Chinese Theater after Lucy (Lucille Ball) had made off with the cement slab containing the footprints of John Wayne. The actor himself finds the whole affair so amusing that he agrees to plant his feet in a fresh mixture of cement right in the Ricardos' suite at the Beverly Palms Hotel. Alas, Lucy assumes that the footprints are forgeries and wipes them clean -- forcing her to use a clever subterfuge (namely, disguising herself as a male masseur!) to trick Wayne into providing a third set of prints. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Lucy Visits Grauman's
    The opening episode of I Love Lucy's fifth season is a continuation of the story arc in which the Ricardos and the Mertzes are visiting Hollywood, where Ricky (Desi Arnaz) has been signed to make picture for MGM. During her last week in Tinseltown, Lucy (Lucille Ball) is determined to get her hands on a valuable souvenir. This she does when she "borrows" the footprints of John Wayne, which have been immortalized in a slab of cement in the forecourt of Grauman's Chinese Theater. But grabbing Wayne's prints isn't as difficult a task as returning them, as Lucy and Ethel (Vivian Vance) learn to their dismay. The outcome of this little escapade will not be revealed until the next episode, so stay tuned. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: The Tour
    While their husbands are otherwise occupied, Lucy (Lucille Ball) and Ethel (Vivian Vance) take a bus sightseeing tour of Los Angeles. When the bus pulls up near the home of actor Richard Widmark, Lucy announces that Widmark and her husband, Ricky (Desi Arnaz), are at that moment having lunch together. This announcement neatly foreshadows the hilarity to come when, in her efforts to swipe a souvenir orange from Widmark's backyard, Lucy falls over the fence and is trapped on the actor's estate. Ultimately, Widmark and Ricky show up to have lunch -- whereupon Lucy adopts what may be her most ridiculous disguise ever. This was the final episode of I Love Lucy's fourth season. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: The Fashion Show
    With great reluctance, Ricky (Desi Arnaz) allows Lucy (Lucille Ball) to purchase a new gown at the trendy establishment owned by designer Don Loper -- provided she spends no more than one hundred dollars. Unfortunately, there is nothing that cheap at Loper's, and thus Lucy tries to figure out a way to get a gown without paying a cent. Her opportunity comes when the wife of Gordon MacRae is forced to pull out of a charity fashion show featuring celebrities' wives as models. Armed with the knowledge that she'll get to keep the gown she wears, Lucy arranges to take Mrs. MacRae's place in the show -- but first, she must get herself a deep "California tan" so that she'll fit in with the Beverly Hills crowd. Alas, her overnight tan degenerates into a "burn" -- and it is very red-faced (and red-everything) Lucy who appears in the fashion show wearing a most uncomfortable tweed outfit. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Lucy Gets in Pictures
    Now that Ricky (Desi Arnaz) is starring in a movie version of "Don Juan," and former vaudevillians Fred (William Frawley) and Ethel (Vivian Vance) have been offered supporting roles in a Donald O'Connor picture, Lucy (Lucille Ball) is dying to get before the cameras herself. Her persistence pays off when she lands a small part as a chorus girl in an MGM musical. Unfortunately, Lucy's part requires her to wear an enormous -- and very unwieldy -- headdress, and her vain efforts to maintain her balance during a musical number causes the movie to go way over budget. In desperation, the film's director (Lou Krugman) cuts Lucy's part (that of a murder victim) to a "carry-on," in which her fully covered-up body is carted off the set by two policemen. But though she has been denied her close-up, Lucy still manages to make an indelible mark on her big scene. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: The Passports
    It's all settled: Lucy (Lucille Ball) will be allowed to go along when Ricky (Desi Arnaz) and his band take their European tour, and so will Fred and Ethel Mertz (William Frawley, Vivian Vance), inasmuch as Fred has been temporarily appointed Ricky's manager. Alas, Lucy won't be able to get a passport until she produces her birth certificate -- which she can't. But there's good news from the passport officials: if Lucy can provide at least two people willing to verify that they've known her since birth, she can cut through the bureaucracy. However, the witnesses fall through, leaving Lucy no other option but to try to stow away on the Europe-bound ocean liner -- and this leads to the classic slapstick set piece wherein Lucy is locked in a steamer trunk. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Lucy Goes to a Rodeo
    When Ricky (Desi Arnaz) is unable to appear in Fred's lodge variety show, Fred (William Frawley) enlists the "talents" of Lucy (Lucille Ball) and Ethel (Vivian Vance). Since the show is going to have a Western theme, Fred asks his old pal Rattlesnake Jones (Dub Taylor) to act as technical advisor and musical coach. As things turn out, Ricky is hired to emcee a rodeo -- and he needs to put together a "cowboy" show in only two days. So just guess what happens next. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: The Mr. and Mrs. TV Show
    No synopsis available.

    I Love Lucy: Nursery School
    At the insistence of Ricky (Desi Arnaz), Little Ricky (Joseph A. Mayer and Michael Mayer) spends his first day at nursery school -- and Lucy (Lucille Ball) is as nervous as a mother hen. Much to her relief, the boy adapts well to school, but close proximity to other children causes him to develop a slight cold. Lucy takes Little Ricky to the doctor, who diagnoses tonsillitis, necessitating a minor operation. Determined to spend the night with Little Ricky in his hospital room, Lucy disguises herself as a nurse -- and the medical profession will never be the same. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    I Love Lucy: California, Here We Come!
    Kathryn Card makes her first appearance as Mrs. MacGillicuddy, the flamboyant mother of Lucy Ricardo (Lucille Ball). Upon learning that Lucy and Ricky (Desi Arnaz) are preparing a motor trip to Hollywood, Mrs. McGillicuddy shows up at the Ricardo apartment, insisting on going along for the ride. Through a series of mirthful misunderstandings, Fred (William Frawley) and Ethel (Vivian Vance) become convinced that they've been "uninvited" to accompany the Ricardos to California -- and when this happens, Lucy refuses to go as well. Even more complications ensue before the trip can get under way with the now-famous rendition of "California, Here We Come," performed by Lucy, Ricky, Fred, and Ethel in front of I Love Lucy's first-ever "rear projection" shot. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Lucy and Harpo Marx
    In one of the best and most popular I Love Lucy episodes of all, Lucy (Lucille Ball) continues her efforts to convince her visiting friend, Caroline Appleby (Doris Singleton), that she has been hobnobbing with all the big stars during her stay in Hollywood. Taking advantage of Caroline's nearsightedness, Lucy hides Caroline's glasses -- and, with the help of some clever costuming and a collection of celebrity masks, she passes herself off as Gary Cooper, Clark Gable, and Jimmy Durante. Meanwhile, Ricky (Desi Arnaz) and Fred (William Frawley) run across Harpo Marx -- in full costume, having just performed a benefit -- near the Beverly Palms Hotel pool. The boys ask Harpo to pay a visit to Caroline so that she can go home claiming to have met a genuine Hollywood movie star. What Harpo doesn't know is that Lucy, in her zeal to keep up her deception with Caroline, has just donned another disguise -- that of Harpo Marx! This is the episode in which Lucille Ball and Harpo Marx, dressed in identical outfits, brilliantly restage the famous "mirror routine" from the 1933 Marx Brothers film Duck Soup -- and as a bonus, Harpo performs a harp rendition of "Take Me Out to the Ballgame." ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Homecoming
    Upon returning to New York, Ricky (Desi Arnaz) is lavished with so much attention because of his upcoming movie debut that Lucy (Lucille Ball) begins to feel neglected. Imagine her delight, then, when a journalist (Elvia Allman) asks Lucy for an interview. Anxiously preparing for the big moment, Lucy has no idea that the journalist merely wants to use Lucy to get a story from Ricky. This leads to a climactic comic set piece in which Lucy, impressed that Ricky has become so lofty a celebrity, decides to treat him like a king -- until he takes unfair advantage of her strange new behavior. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: The Ricardos Are Interviewed
    The Ricardos are asked to appear on "Face-to-Face," a Person to Person-type TV interview show which will be broadcast live from their home. In order to make the best possible impression, Ricky's agent (John Gallaudet) plans to move the Ricardos out of their small New York apartment and in to a swanky, spacious Park Avenue suite. Naturally, Lucy (Lucille Ball) and Ricky (Desi Arnaz) do not want to move away from their best friends, Fred (William Frawley) and Ethel (Vivian Vance) -- or at least, they didn't want to move before Fred and Ethel underwent a bizarre character transformation and turned into a pair of unhospitable monstrosities. ~ Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Lucy and Bob Hope
    No synopsis available.

    I Love Lucy: Second Honeymoon
    No synopsis available.

    I Love Lucy: Staten Island Ferry
    As the Ricardos and the Mertzes prepare for their ocean voyage to Europe, Fred Mertz (William Frawley) struggles gamely but vainly to overcome his chronic seasickness. Lucy (Lucille Ball) suggests that Fred take a trial run on the Staten Island Ferry, and that he fortify himself with seasickness pills. Unfortunately, it is Lucy who develops a bad case of mal de mer -- and worse still, the pills make her extremely drowsy, just at the moment that she must apply for her passport. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Little Ricky's School Pageant
    The Ricardos and the Mertzes are enlisted to perform in Little Ricky's kindergarten play "The Enchanted Forest." Although Ricky (Desi Arnaz) had hoped to direct the production, he is instead assigned the role of "The Hollow Stump," while Fred (William Frawley) and Ethel (Vivian Vance) are respectively cast as "Hippity-Hoppity the Frog" and "The Fairy Princess." But the big money act is, as always, Lucy (Lucille Ball), making a meal of her role as "The Wicked Old Witch" -- and adroitly covering for Little Ricky (Richard Keith) whenever the five-year-old trouper goes up in his lines. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Lucy Meets Charles Boyer
    Forewarned that starstruck Lucy (Lucille Ball) and Ethel (Vivian Vance) intend to accost French film idol Charles Boyer at a Parisian sidewalk restaurant, Ricky (Desi Arnaz) manages to reach Boyer first to prepare the poor fellow for the assault to come. The amused actor decide to play a trick on Lucy, pretending not to be "himself" but instead a Charles Boyer lookalike named Maurice DuBois. The situation is milked to the last drop when Lucy hires "Maurice DuBois" to pose as Charles Boyer in order to arouse Ricky's jealousy. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Return Home From Europe
    Returning from Europe to the U.S. by plane, the Ricardos and the Mertzes must be very careful in packing their bags, since any luggage over 66 pounds will cost a lot of customs money. It so happens, however, that Lucy (Lucille Ball) has purchased a 25-pound slab of rare Italian cheese as gift for her mother, and she's not about to leave the gift behind. This explains why Lucy ends up on Pan American Airlines flight number 155 holding a bundle in her arms which she claims is a sleeping baby named "Cheddar -- ah, Chester!" And thus, with this classic I Love Lucy episode, the series' fifth season comes to a close. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Little Ricky Learns to Play the Drums
    Like father, like son: having been given a set of drums, Little Ricky (Richard Keith) is proving to be as musically talented as his bandleader dad, Ricky Ricardo (Desi Arnaz). Unfortunately, Little Ricky insists upon practicing his drums night and day, resulting in massive headaches for the Ricardos' neighbors in general and Fred (William Frawley) and Ethel (Vivian Vance) in particular. Ultimately, the Mertzes try to force the Ricardos to break their lease, whereupon Lucy (Lucille Ball) retaliates in her own inimitable (and scatterbrained) fashion. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Visitor From Italy
    Mario Orsatti (Jay Novello), who had been the Ricardos and the Mertzes' gondolier in Venice, arrives in New York to visit his brother Dominic (Peter Brocco). Unable to locate his brother, Mario turns to Lucy (Lucille Ball) for help. She determines that Dominic is actually in San Francisco, and decides to raise the necessary bus fare by securing a job for Mario in a local pizza parlor. But when the immigration officials come calling, Lucy is forced to take Mario's place. You guessed it: Lucy plus pizza equals a dough-splattered disaster! ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Lucy in the Swiss Alps
    Arriving in Switzerland as part of Ricky's professional tour of Europe, the Ricardos and the Mertzes find they have shown up in the wrong town -- and worse, the only local musicians available are members of a polka band. To mollify the angry Ricky (Desi Arnaz), Lucy (Lucille Ball) suggests that they accompany Fred (William Frawley) and Ethel (Vivian Vance) on a hike in the Alps. Unfortunately, an avalanche traps the two couples in a deserted mountain cabin. Certain that they are doomed to death by starvation, the hapless hikers begin making confessions to one another -- hilarious and heartbreaking all at once. Happily, rescue is at hand -- and you'll never guess who the rescuers are. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    I Love Lucy: The Fox Hunt
    In her efforts to make a good impression on British movie producer Sir Clive Richardson (Walter Kingsford) -- and, incidentally, to keep Ricky (Desi Arnaz) far away from British actress Angela Randall (Hillary Brooke) -- Lucy wangles an invitation to Richardson's country manor by claiming to be an expert horsewoman. Upon arriving in the country, Lucy is shocked to discover that (a) Angela Randall is Sir Clive's daughter, and (b) there is to be fox hunt over the weekend -- and Lucy is expected to participate. Suffice it to say that this episode is much funnier than the subsequent fox-hunt sequence in Lucille Ball's 1974 theatrical feature Mame. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Bon Voyage
    While boarding the USS Constitution on the first leg of the Ricardos' and the Mertzes' trip to Europe, Lucy (Lucille Ball) impulsively races down the gangplank to bid one last goodbye to Little Ricky. Unfortunately, she gets her dress caught on a bicycle chain and is unable to return to the ship, which sails without her. Desperate to be reunited with her husband and friends on the deck of the Constitution, Lucy ends up placing her life in the hands of a friendly helicopter pilot. Watch for future Chico and the Man star Jack Albertson in the small role of a helicopter dispatcher. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Desert Island
    Intent upon preventing Ricky (Desi Arnaz) and Fred (William Frawley) from judging a bathing beauty contest in Miami Beach, Lucy (Lucille Ball) and Ethel (Vivian Vance) arrange for the foursome to "accidentally" run out of gas while taking a boat cruise. Unfortunately, the backup gas tank planted by Lucy is mislaid, and the two couples (as well as Little Ricky [Richard Keith]) end up on a seemingly deserted island. By a stunning coincidence, this island is also being used by a movie company to film a documentary featuring actor Claude Akins, and two gorgeous swimsuit-clad starlets, Joi Lansing and Jill Jarmyn. Taking Akins into their confidence, Ricky and Fred decide to teach Lucy and Ethel a lesson for marooning them -- and without giving any more of the plot away, it should be noted that Akins is made up as a fierce Native American warrior. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Lucy Gets Homesick in Italy
    Thanks to the somewhat inadequate managerial skills of Fred Mertz (William Frawley), the Ricardos and the Mertzes are booked into a fourth-class Florence hotel during the Italian leg of Ricky's European musical tour. This means that Lucy (Lucille Ball) is unable to make telephone contact with Little Ricky back in the states on the occasion of the boy's birthday. Possessed with homesickness, Lucy "adopts" an Italian shoeshine boy named Giuseppe (Bart Bradley), who claims that it is his birthday as well -- and who turns out to be a first-class con artist. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Lucy Meets the Queen
    Upon their arrival in London, Lucy (Lucille Ball) and Ethel (Vivian Vance) pay a visit to Buckingham Palace, where they spend a hilarious few minutes trying to get a stone-faced palace guard to crack a smile. Later on, Ricky (Desi Arnaz) is invited to meet the royal family -- but alas, Lucy hasn't been included in the invitation. Determined to land an audience with Queen Elizabeth, Lucy secures a job as a dancer in a Royal Command Performance -- and develops a charley horse just before she is to take her customary bow in the queen's presence. Watch for The Beverly Hillbillies' future Miss Jane, Nancy Kulp, as a cockney hotel maid. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Paris at Last
    No sooner has Lucy (Lucille Ball) arrived in Paris than she is greeted by a friendly citizen (Larry Dobkin) -- who is willing to exchange her dollars for French francs, at bargain prices. She is then introduced to a "starving" artist (Shepard Menken), who at great personal loss to himself sells her his masterpiece for a mere 1,000 francs. As the day progresses, Lucy gets into a brouhaha at a French restaurant -- and then ends up in "the bastille" when her money turns out to be counterfeit. Episode highlights include a hilarious round-robin "translation" sequence involving Lucy, Ricky (Desi Arnaz), a gendarme, and a German drunk, and the closing gag, wherein the true value of that "artistic masterpiece" is finally revealed. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Little Ricky Gets Stage Fright
    On the night he is to play his drums in his kindergarten orchestra, Little Ricky (Richard Keith) is suddenly paralyzed with stage fright -- mainly because his parents and the Mertzes had been so nervous themselves just before the performance. Hoping to help her son overcome his fear of appearing in public, Lucy (Lucille Ball) persuades Ricky to let Little Ricky play a drum solo at Club Babalu. She then attempts to mollify the boy by using "reverse psychology," pretending that she doesn't want him to perform -- a strategy that nearly sabotages the poor kid a second time. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Lucy's Italian Movie
    In one of the all-time classic I Love Lucy episodes, the Ricardos and the Mertzes have arrived in Italy, where Lucy (Lucille Ball) is determined to land a role in film director Vittorio Felipe's (Franco Corsaro) upcoming neorealistic epic, "Bitter Grapes." Figuring it would be wise to "research" her role, Lucy pays a visit to Turo, a village renowned for its vineyards and winemaking prowess. Before she quite knows what has happened, Lucy has been hired to work as a grape-stomper in a huge wine vat...and any further elaboration on the plotline is surely unnecessary for anyone who truly loves Lucy. (Incidentally, Lucy's fellow vineyard employee -- and as it turns out, her sparring partner -- is played by Teresa Tirelli, a genuine professional grape crusher from California.) ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Lucy's Bicycle Trip
    Still in Europe,the Ricardos and the Mertzes decide to make the trip from Italy to the French Riviera by bicycle. The journey is painful enough for Lucy (Lucille Ball), who hasn't done all that much biking since her childhood (and who, of course, encounters the usual slapstick complications en route), but the pain really intensifies when she discovers that she's left her passport in her suitcase, which has been sent ahead to their French hotel room. Unable to convince the French and Italian border guards to bend the rules for her, Lucy is sure that things just simply can't get any worse -- but it turns out they certainly can. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    I Love Lucy: The Ricardos Visit Cuba
    In 1956, it was still possible for Americans to take a working vacation in Cuba, and the Ricardos and the Mertzes are no exception. Upon setting foot on his native soil, Ricky (Desi Arnaz) makes a beeline to the home of his mother (Mary Emery), hoping to introduce Lucy (Lucille Ball) and Little Ricky (Richard Keith) to his Cuban relatives -- especially the highly regarded head of the Ricardo clan, Uncle Alberto (George Trevino). Naturally, Lucy makes a shambles of the reunion, but all ends happily in a lavish nightclub performance at Havana's Casino Parisien, where Desi Arnaz sings "I'm a Lucky Guy" and duets with Richard Keith in a con brio presentation of his signature number "Baba Lu." ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Lucy Goes to Monte Carlo
    With his budget tighter than usual thanks to the near-sighted "management" of his pal Fred (William Frawley), Ricky (Desi Arnaz) has little money left to do anything but perform with his band when the Ricardos and the Mertzes arrive in Monte Carlo. Naturally, this means that Ricky must forbid Lucy (Lucille Ball) to go anywhere near the resort's famous gambling casino, but this doesn't stop Lucy and Ethel (Vivian Vance) from "accidentally" wandering past the gaming tables while having dinner. Luck of luck, Lucy finds a chip that someone has dropped, unthinkingly places the chip on a roulette table, and wins 875,000 francs! But with group wealth comes great responsibilities -- namely, trying to hide the money from the suspicious Ricky. Alas, Lucy chooses to stuff the excess dough in Ethel's luggage...and when Ricky inadvertently stumbles upon it, he immediately assumes that Fred has become an embezzler. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Lucy Meets Orson Welles
    When Orson Welles was signed to produce and direct films at RKO Radio Pictures in 1939, he'd wanted to cast Lucille Ball in an adaptation of Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness. The studio turned Welles down, insisting that the actress "can't carry a picture." Seventeen years later, Ball was more than carrying her own TV series -- and thus, she and Orson Welles were finally able to work together. The plot of this episode finds Lucy Ricardo (Ball) trying to insinuate herself into Welles' act at her husband Ricky's (Desi Arnaz) nightclub. When Welles decides to hire her, Lucy alerts her former high-school drama coach (Ellen Corby), assuming that she will be co-starring in a scene from Shakespeare. What Lucy doesn't know until the night of the performance is that Orson merely wants her to assist him with the "levitation" routine in his magic act. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Lucy Goes to Scotland
    In an original half-hour musical fantasy, Lucy (Lucille Ball) dreams about meeting the rest of the McGillicuddy family in the quaint Scottish town of Kildoonan. Instead, she is swept off her feet by the handsome, kilted Scotty MacTavish MacDougal MacCardo -- who bears a remarkable resemblance to her husband, Ricky (Desi Arnaz). Ah, but there's danger afoot in Kildoonan when Lucy is slated to be the next meal for a fierce two-headed dragon -- which of course is a dead ringer for Fred and Ethel Mertz (William Frawley), Vivian Vance. Larry Orenstein, seen as the mayor of Kildoonan, also wrote the episode's songs, which include "A McGillicuddy Is Here," "I'm in Love Wwith a Dragon's Dinner," "Two Heads Are Better Than One," "'Tis Nae a Braw Bricht Nicht," and "Dragon Waltz." ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Lucy Gets a Paris Gown
    When Ricky (Desi Arnaz) refuses to buy Lucy (Lucille Ball) an original French designer gown, she goes on a hunger strike. Terrified that his spouse will starve to death, Ricky finally relents -- only to discover that, throughout Lucy's "strike," Ethel (Vivian Vance) has been smuggling food to her. By means of revenge, Ricky commissions a hideous-looking "outfit" comprised of two burlap sacks and a horse's feedbag, and presents this masterpiece to Lucy -- while Fred (William Frawley) does the same to Ethel. The girls unwittingly parade through the streets of Paris in their ersatz gowns -- and instead of making public spectacles of themselves, they emerge as fashion trendsetters. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Off to Florida
    In another "on the road" story arc, the Ricardos and the Mertzes prepare to vacation in Florida. When Lucy (Lucille Ball) loses two of the train tickets, she and Ethel (Vivian Vance) advertise for a traveling companion to help drive to Florida and pay expenses. The ad is answered by Mrs. Grundy (Elsa Lanchester), an eccentric health-food fanatic who seems to be in a terrible hurry to get to the Sunshine State. En route to their destination, Lucy and Ethel are confronted with "evidence" suggesting that Mrs. Grundy may be the notorious ax murderer Evelyn Holmby! Also appearing in this episode is a young, clean-shaven, decidedly pre-Cool Hand Luke Strother Martin. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Lucy and Superman
    No synopsis available.

    I Love Lucy: Lucy Raises Tulips
    It's Lucy Ricardo (Lucille Ball) vs. Betty Ramsey (Mary Jane Croft) as both ladies compete to win the gold cup at the annual Westport flower show. For her part, Lucy carefully cultivates a garden of tulips, then asks Ricky (Desi Arnaz) to mow the lawn to make the Ricardo backyard "picture perfect." But Ricky doesn't finish the job, leaving Lucy and Ethel (Vivian Vance) to do it themselves -- and to accidentally "do in" Betty Ramsey's tulips in the process. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Lucy and the Loving Cup
    Jockey Johnny Longden and his wife, Hazel Longdon, appear as themselves in this episode, in which Ricky (Desi Arnaz) is chosen to present a loving cup to Longden at a dinner for the National Turf Association. Having been chided for purchasing what Ricky regards as a ridiculous-looking hat, Lucy (Lucille Ball) jokingly places the loving cup on herself -- and then can't get it off! The situation reaches outrageous heights when Lucy tries to hide her "adornment" while riding on a subway train in search of a silversmith who will extricate our heroine from her dilemma. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Lucy Raises Chickens
    Lucy (Lucille Ball) decides to earn some extra spending money by going into the chicken-farming business. Ricky (Desi Arnaz) then advertises for an "experienced" couple to help out with this business enterprise -- and wouldn't you know it, that couple turns out to be Fred and Ethel Mertz (William Frawley, Vivian Vance). The fun begins when Lucy and Ethel purchase 500 baby chicks, not bothering to check if Ricky and Fred are finished building the henhouse. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Little Ricky Gets a Dog
    When Little Ricky (Richard Keith) brings home a puppy, Lucy (Lucille Ball) and Ricky (Desi Arnaz) decide that the mutt cannot stay -- especially since their son has already turned their apartment into a menagerie with such pets as a frog, a lizard, and a turtle. Alas, both Lucy and Ricky fall in love with the puppy and can't bring themselves to evict it. Finally, landlord Fred Mertz (William Frawley) takes a hand in matters -- but even he is unable to throw the doggie out, especially upon learning that Little Ricky has named the puppy "Fred." Voice actress June Foray of Rocky and Bullwinkle fame provides the barks and yelps for the "guest dog." ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Lucy Does the Tango
    Discouraged by the disappointing returns of the Ricardos' new chicken-raising business, Ricky (Desi Arnaz) declares that he'll sell all his hens unless they starting laying more eggs. Hoping to mollify Ricky, Lucy (Lucille Ball) and Ethel (Vivian Vance) purchase five dozen eggs and plant them in the hen's nests. Unfortunately, Fred (William Frawley) unexpectedly shows up, and rather than admit her subterfuge, Lucy stuffs dozens of eggs in her clothes. It is at this point that Ricky arrives home, insisting that he and Lucy rehearse their tango routine for the upcoming Westport PTA show. The slapstick routine that follows elicited the loudest and longest sustained audience laughter of any episode in the history of I Love Lucy -- one minute and five seconds. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Lucy's Night in Town
    Lucy (Lucille Ball) wants to return to New York for a fancy dinner and a Broadway show. As luck would have it, the Ricardos and the Mertzes have managed to get four tickets for the sold-out Frank Loesser musical The Most Happy Fella. Unfortunately, those tickets are only for a matinee performance, and only two balcony tickets are available for the evening show. Not wishing to be deprived of their "big evening," Lucy and Ethel (Vivian Vance) hit upon a brilliant idea: the girls will use the tickets to watch the first act of The Most Happy Fella, then exchange their ticket stubs with Ricky (Desi Arnaz) and Fred (William Frawley) so that the boys can enjoy Act Two. Well...it seemed like a brilliant idea at the time.... ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Country Club Dance
    A pre-I Dream of Jeannie Barbara Eden guest stars as Diana Jordan, a sexy young lass who attends a country club dance along with the Ricardos, the Mertzes, and the Ramseys. Much to their wives' dismay, Ricky Ricardo (Desi Arnaz), Fred Mertz (William Frawley), and Ralph Ramsey (Frank Nelson) are all much smitten by the flirtatious Diana. In order to regain their husbands' attentions, Lucy Ricardo (Lucille Ball), Ethel Mertz (Vivian Vance), and Betty Ramsey (Mary Jane Croft) all purchase expensive new clothes and subject themselves to an elaborate "glamour" treatment. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Lucy Misses the Mertzes
    Now securely installed in their country house in Westport, CT, Lucy (Lucille Ball) and Ricky (Desi Arnaz) get lonely for their longtime friends Fred and Ethel Mertz (William Frawley, Vivian Vance), who are still living in New York. For old times' sake, the Ricardos head to the Big Apple to pay a surprise visit to the Mertzes. They'll all be surprised: it so happens that at the same time, the lonely Mertzes are en route to Westport to visit the Ricardos. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Lucy Hates to Leave
    Ricky (Desi Arnaz) is worried about moving into a house in Connecticut, but Lucy (Lucille Ball) mollifies her husband by assuring him that a 20-year mortgage is easier to pay than monthly rent -- and besides, think of all the new furniture they will get. Thus persuaded, Ricky arranges with landlord Fred (William Frawley) to rent out the Ricardos' New York apartment to a young couple, who stipulate that they must take possession immediately. Unfortunately, circumstance dictate that Lucy and Ricky are unable to move to the country right away; thus they must temporarily move in with the Mertzes, bag and baggage. And then, Lucy suddenly gets sentimental over her "beloved" old furniture.... ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Lucy Wants to Move to the Country
    I Love Lucy heads in a whole new direction for its final 13 episodes when Lucy (Lucille Ball), feeling confined by apartment living, talks Ricky (Desi Arnaz) into making a deposit on a spacious country house in Westport, CT. But no sooner has Ricky done so than Lucy changes her mind, choosing to remain in New York with her friends the Mertzes. Unfortunately, Ricky is unable to get back the 500-dollar deposit, leaving it up to Lucy, Fred (William Frawley), and Ethel (William Frawley) to hatch an elaborate scheme (replete with garish costumes) to retrieve the cash. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    I Love Lucy: The Ricardos Dedicate a Statue
    As Westport gears up to celebrate its annual "Yankee Doodle Day," the Ricardos and the Mertzes are swept up in the patriotic fervor. Despite his thick Cuban accent (or maybe because of it?), Ricky (Desi Arnaz) is selected to give the dedication speech at the unveiling of a new Revolutionary War monument, the centerpiece of which is a stone sculpture of a kneeling Yankee soldier. Alas, Lucy (Lucille Ball) accidentally breaks the statue, forcing her to take drastic action (and adopt yet another "clever" disguise) for the unveiling. This 180th and final half-hour I Love Lucy episode features Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz' four-year-old son, Desi Arnaz Jr., as an extra in the climactic sequence (but not Desi Jr.'s six-year-old sister, Lucie Arnaz, despite previously published reports). ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Housewarming
    The friendship between Lucy (Lucille Ball) and Ethel (Vivian Vance) becomes strained when both vie for the attentions of Lucy's new Connecticut neighbor Betty Ramsey (Mary Jane Croft). However, it looks as though everything will turn out all right when, listening in on the newly installed intercom between the Ricardos and the Mertzes, Lucy and Ricky (Desi Arnaz) jump to the conclusion that Fred (William Frawley) and Ethel are planning a housewarming for them. Only one problem: Fred and Ethel have planned nothing of the kind, and as the episode hastens to its climax, it appears as though the Ricardos are all dressed up with nowhere to go. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Building a B.B.Q.
    To keep their husbands from being underfoot while they do the housework, Lucy (Lucille Ball) and Ethel (Vivian Vance) try to talk Ricky (Desi Arnaz) and Fred (William Frawley) into building a backyard barbecue. When the boys show no signs of undertaking the project, the girls begin constructing the barbecue themselves, hoping to shame their husbands out of the house. Ricky and Fred take the bait, only to figure out that they've fallen for the old "whitewash" routine. To teach Lucy a lesson, Ricky decides not to tell her that he's found her wedding ring, which she had taken off during the cement-laying process. Alas, the panicky Lucy concludes that the only way to locate her ring is to rip the new barbecue apart, brick by brick. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Ragtime Band
    Lucy (Lucille Ball) volunteers Ricky's band to perform for a Westport Historical Society fundraiser, assuming that he'll say yes when he finds out. Ricky (Desi Arnaz) finds out, all right, but the answer is no. Undaunted, Lucy organizes her own band, with herself on saxophone, Fred (William Frawley) on fiddle, Little Ricky (Richard Keith) on drums, and Ethel (Vivian Vance) as vocalist. This hilarious episode contains one of those endearing continuity gaffs so beloved of I Love Lucy buffs, as Lucy reveals that the only song she knows how to play is "She'll Be Coming' Round the Mountain" -- negating the information imparted in the second-season episode "The Saxophone," wherein Lucy's repertoire consisted solely of "Glow Worm." ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    I Love Lucy: Lucy Gets Chummy With the Neighbors
    Familiar I Love Lucy supporting players Mary Jane Croft and Frank Nelson make their first series appearances as Betty and Ralph Ramsey, the Ricardos' new Connecticut neighbors. Becoming fast friends with Betty Ramsey, Lucy decides to take Betty's advice on purchasing new furniture at a 40-percent discount from local store manager Mr. Perry (Parley Baer). The problem: Ricky (Desi Arnaz) has allotted Lucy a furniture budget of only 500 dollars -- but impulsive Lucy has bought practically everything in Perry's store, toting up a bill exceeding 3,000 bucks! In the fracas that follows, the friendship between the Ricardos and the Ramseys bids fare to be shot down in flames before it ever gets off the ground. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

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  • The Brady Bunch: Is There a Doctor in the House? (1969)
  • The Brady Bunch: The Honeymoon (1969)
  • The Brady Bunch: Dear Libby (1969)
  • The Brady Bunch: A Clubhouse Is Not a Home (1969)
  • The Brady Bunch: Kitty Karry-All Is Missing (1969)
  • The Brady Bunch: A-Camping We Will Go (1969)
  • The Brady Bunch: Vote for Brady (1969)
  • The Brady Bunch: Everybody Does It Once (1969)
  • The Brady Bunch: The Voice of Christmas (1969)
  • The Brady Bunch: Katchoo (1969)
  • The Brady Bunch: Eenie, Meenie, Mommy, Daddy (1969)
  • The Brady Bunch: Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore (1969)
  • The Brady Bunch: Lost Locket, Found Locket (1970)
  • The Brady Bunch: Confessions, Confessions (1970)
  • The Brady Bunch: Going, Going. . .Steady (1970)
  • The Brady Bunch: The Tattletale (1970)
  • The Brady Bunch: Call Me Irresponsible (1970)
  • The Brady Bunch: The Impractical Joker (1970)
  • The Brady Bunch: A Fistful of Reasons (1970)
  • The Brady Bunch: The Un-Underground Movie (1970)
  • The Brady Bunch: Sorry, Right Number (1970)
  • The Brady Bunch: 54-40 and Fight (1970)
  • The Brady Bunch: The Big Sprain (1970)
  • The Brady Bunch: The Dropout (1970)
  • The Brady Bunch: The Babysitters (1970)
  • The Brady Bunch: The Treasure of Sierra Avenue (1970)
  • The Brady Bunch: The Hero (1970)
  • The Brady Bunch: Mike's Horror-Scope (1970)
  • The Brady Bunch: The Undergraduate (1970)
  • The Brady Bunch: To Move or Not to Move (1970)
  • The Brady Bunch: Tiger, Tiger! (1970)
  • The Brady Bunch: Father of the Year (1970)
  • The Brady Bunch: What Goes Up (1970)
  • The Brady Bunch: The Not-So-Ugly Duckling (1970)
  • The Brady Bunch: The Grass Is Always Greener (1970)
  • The Brady Bunch: Brace Yourself (1970)
  • The Brady Bunch: The Slumber Caper (1970)
  • The Brady Bunch: The Possible Dream (1970)
  • The Brady Bunch: Sergeant Emma (1971)
  • The Brady Bunch: Cindy Brady, Lady (1971)
  • The Brady Bunch: My Sister, Benedict Arnold (1971)
  • The Brady Bunch: The Personality Kid (1971)
  • The Brady Bunch: Juliet Is the Sun (1971)
  • The Brady Bunch: And Now, a Word From Our Sponsor (1971)
  • The Brady Bunch: My Fair Opponent (1971)
  • The Brady Bunch: The Fender Benders (1971)
  • The Brady Bunch: Ghost Town, U.S.A. (1971)
  • The Brady Bunch: Grand Canyon or Bust (1971)
  • The Brady Bunch: The Brady Braves (1971)
  • The Brady Bunch: The Wheeler-Dealer (1971)
  • The Brady Bunch: The Private Ear (1971)
  • The Brady Bunch: Click (1971)
  • The Brady Bunch: The Not-So-Rose-Colored Glasses (1971)
  • The Brady Bunch: The Teeter-Totter Caper (1971)
  • The Brady Bunch: Big Little Man (1971)
  • The Brady Bunch: Dough Re Mi (1971)
  • The Brady Bunch: Jan's Aunt Jenny (1971)
  • The Brady Bunch: The Big Bet (1971)
  • The Brady Bunch: Our Son, the Man (1971)
  • The Brady Bunch: The Liberation of Marcia Brady (1971)
  • The Brady Bunch: Her Sister's Shadow (1971)
  • The Brady Bunch: Lights Out (1971)
  • The Brady Bunch: Getting Davy Jones (1971)
  • The Brady Bunch: Coming-Out Party (1971)
  • The Brady Bunch: Tell It Like It Is (1971)
  • The Brady Bunch: The Drummer Boy (1971)
  • The Brady Bunch: Where There's Smoke (1971)
  • The Brady Bunch: Will the Real Jan Brady Please Stand Up? (1971)
  • The Brady Bunch: The Power of the Press (1971)
  • The Brady Bunch: Alice's September Song (1971)
  • The Brady Bunch: Double Parked (1971)
  • The Brady Bunch: The Winner (1971)
  • The Brady Bunch: Cyrano De Brady (1972)
  • The Brady Bunch: Today, I Am a Freshman (1972)
  • The Brady Bunch: Tiki Caves (1972)
  • The Brady Bunch: Pass the Tabu (1972)
  • The Brady Bunch: Hawaii Bound (1972)
  • The Brady Bunch: Fright Night (1972)
  • The Brady Bunch: Greg's Triangle (1972)
  • The Brady Bunch: Goodbye, Alice, Hello (1972)
  • The Brady Bunch: Career Fever (1972)
  • The Brady Bunch: Jan, The Only Child (1972)
  • The Brady Bunch: Show Must Go On?? (1972)
  • The Brady Bunch: Everyone Can't Be George Washington (1972)
  • The Brady Bunch: Adios, Johnny Bravo (1973)
  • The Brady Bunch: Mail Order Hero (1973)
  • The Brady Bunch: Getting Greg's Goat (1973)
  • The Brady Bunch: Marcia Gets Creamed (1973)
  • The Brady Bunch: My Brother's Keeper (1973)
  • The Brady Bunch: Quarterback Sneak (1973)
  • The Brady Bunch: Love and the Older Man (1973)
  • The Brady Bunch: Greg Gets Grounded (1973)
  • The Brady Bunch: Amateur Night (1973)
  • The Brady Bunch: Bobby's Hero (1973)
  • The Brady Bunch: How to Succeed in Business (1973)
  • The Brady Bunch: Never Too Young (1973)
  • The Brady Bunch: Snow White and the Seven Bradys (1973)
  • The Brady Bunch: The Subject Was Noses (1973)
  • The Brady Bunch: Law and Disorder (1973)
  • The Brady Bunch: Miss Popularity (1973)
  • The Brady Bunch: The Elopement (1973)
  • The Brady Bunch: The Cincinnati Kids (1973)
  • The Brady Bunch: Try, Try Again (1973)
  • The Brady Bunch: Room at the Top (1973)
  • The Brady Bunch: You Can't Win 'Em All (1973)
  • The Brady Bunch: Peter and the Wolf (1973)
  • The Brady Bunch: Great Earring Caper (1973)
  • The Brady Bunch: You're Never Too Old (1973)
  • The Brady Bunch: Kelly's Kids (1974)
  • The Brady Bunch: The Driver's Seat (1974)
  • The Brady Bunch: Out of This World (1974)
  • The Brady Bunch: Welcome Aboard (1974)
  • The Brady Bunch: Two Petes in a Pod (1974)
  • The Brady Bunch: Top Secret (1974)
  • The Brady Bunch: The Snooperstar (1974)
  • The Brady Bunch: The Hustler (1974)
  • The Brady Bunch: The Hairbrained Scheme (1974)

    The Brady Bunch: Is There a Doctor in the House?
    All the Brady kids get sick in this classic episode. First, Peter (Christopher Knight) is stricken with measles. Then, Jan (Eve Plumb) succumbs to the itchy ailment. Soon, all the kids are bedridden and covered in little red dots. This first Brady epidemic brings up a pressing question -- not whether to call a doctor, but rather, which doctor to call? The boys want a man, Dr. Cameron, played by Herbert Anderson, who also played the dad on Dennis the Menace. The girls want a woman, Dr. Porter, played by Marion Ross who later played Mrs. Cunningham on Happy Days. Mike (Robert Reed) and Carol (Florence Henderson) have a perplexing decision to make. There must a be a solution in there somewhere. This episode originally aired on December 26, 1969. ~ Matt Collar, Rovi

    The Brady Bunch: The Honeymoon
    The pilot episode of the ever-popular family show focuses on the wedding ceremony of widower architect Mike Brady (Robert Reed) and his bride, Carol Martin (Florence Henderson). At Carol's house, she is helped into her canary yellow wedding gown by her equally yellow daughters, Marcia (Maureen McCormick), Jan (Eve Plumb), and Cindy (Susan Olsen). Meanwhile, Mike -- fending off last-minute jitters -- helps his sons, Greg (Barry Williams), Peter (Christopher Knight), and Bobby (Michael Lookinland) slick down their hair (notice Bobby's is naturally red and not dyed black as in later episodes). Finally, the impending bunch is gathered for the ceremony. Ironically, it is the respective family pets -- the Martins' cat, Fluffy, and the Brady boys' dog, Tiger -- who reign chaos upon the proceedings. Just as Mike and Carol say "I do," Tiger, spying Fluffy from Mike's car -- the windows rolled up in the California heat no less -- fortuitously paws the electric window button and charges after the smug feline. A full-on Brady chase ensues with Tiger side-swiping the tiered wedding cake. Everyone takes a light-hearted attitude toward the animal's intrusion, and the newly anointed Bradys -- kids included -- depart on a honeymoon. Viewers may notice that all of the kids appear particularly young: This pilot episode was filmed a full year before the actual first episode of season one. Although Carol's previous marital status is never mentioned, she was intended by the series' creators to be a divorcée. ~ Matt Collar, Rovi

    The Brady Bunch: Dear Libby
    At breakfast, Marcia (Maureen McCormick) reads a "Dear Libby" newspaper advice column that shakes her foundations. The column features a letter from a doleful newlywed who does not know if he/she can stand living much longer with his/her spouse's annoying kids. Marcia assumes the worst: Did Mike (Robert Reed) or Carol (Florence Henderson) write the letter? Are the kids breaking up the Bunch? Joe de Winter guest stars as Libby. Although this is technically the first episode, airing on October 3, 1969, the first six episodes of the series were shot out of order to accommodate Florence Henderson's busy schedule while filming Song of Norway. ~ Matt Collar, Rovi

    The Brady Bunch: A Clubhouse Is Not a Home
    The Brady kids bicker about personal space issues, flaring an all-out battle of the sexes by punching and yelling at each other, just like regular brothers and sisters. Subsequently, Mike (Robert Reed) and Carol (Florence Henderson) come to the realization that getting their families to coexist under the same split-level ranch is going to be harder than they thought. Seizing at a possible solution to the dilemma, Marcia (Maureen McCormick) attempts to move herself and her sisters into the backyard clubhouse. Then, fearing the impending loss of the male sanctuary, Greg (Barry Williams) and his brothers block their new siblings with a so-unfair gender discrimination policy. The girls picket. Always searching to infuse a sense of realism into the series, the creators had the actors make their own characters' picket signs. ~ Matt Collar, Rovi

    The Brady Bunch: Kitty Karry-All Is Missing
    During a moment of uncontrolled sibling rage, Bobby (Michael Lookinland) curses Cindy's (Susan Olsen) favorite doll, Kitty Karryall, wishing the bespectacled moppet would just get lost. Chillingly, Kitty Karryall soon goes missing. A distraught Cindy fingers Bobby as the doll-napper. Denying everything, Bobby is temporarily ostracized from the suspicious Brady clan. Then, the mystery deepens as Bobby's kazoo disappears, prompting a countercharge of reactionary theft against Cindy. Should trusty dog Tiger be put on the trail of the thief, or put under suspicion? In actuality, there were two Kitty Karryall dolls used on the set. ~ Matt Collar, Rovi

    The Brady Bunch: A-Camping We Will Go
    The Brady boys are excited about their upcoming camping trip until Mike (Robert Reed) -- with a plan for family "togetherness" -- informs them that the girls will also be going. Even Alice (Ann B. Davis) (picnic basket of emergency food stock at her side) is coming along. Although anticipating a crummy time -- the girls are going to fish as well -- the boys dutifully pack. However, as the trip gets underway the bunch is forced through myriad accidents and hijinks that threaten to bring them closer. This includes a classic scene where the brood all cram into the girls' tent -- collapsing it. This episode is the first of the on-location story lines that later took the cast to such widely disparate climes as Hawaii ( "Hawaii Bound," "Pass the Tabu," "The Tiki Caves") and the Grand Canyon ("Ghost Town U.S.A.," "Grand Canyon or Bust," "The Brady Braves"). ~ Matt Collar, Rovi

    The Brady Bunch: Vote for Brady
    "Vote Marcia" for president! No, "Vote Greg" for president! Political rallying cries echo throughout the halls at school and casa Brady when both of the older kids run for student body president. Once again, it's the girls versus the boys as the Brady siblings choose sides and fight to get their candidate elected. Hoping to quell the political uprising, Mike (Robert Reed) and Carol (Florence Henderson) sit everybody down for a lecture on unity -- egad, not more togetherness! (See "A-Camping We Will Go.") Looks like in the end it's "vote Brady." This politically charged episode originally aired on December 12, 1969. ~ Matt Collar, Rovi

    The Brady Bunch: Everybody Does It Once
    Bobby (Michael Lookinland) obsesses over a television version of the Cinderella story. Cinderella has an evil stepmother; he's got Carol (Florence Henderson). Cinderella has back-breaking chores; he has to clean out the fireplace. Cinderella has evil stepsisters; he's got Marcia. Enough said. It's all too much, and little Boberella decides to run away. (One might add that Cinderella has beautiful blonde hair; the producers of The Brady Bunch had Lookinland's blonde hair dyed black.) Meanwhile, Carol pulls Mike (Robert Reed) away from an important meeting to buy Bobby a bike. Quickly deciding the bike would only be an attempt to buy his love, they return home to find Bobby packed and ready to split. It's going to take a lot of Mike's reverse psychology -- and a surprise gesture of support by Carol -- to keep Bobby from jumping the first pumpkin-covered carriage out of Westdale. Airing happily ever after in syndication-land, this episode originally aired on December 5, 1969. ~ Matt Collar, Rovi

    The Brady Bunch: The Voice of Christmas
    The first "united" Brady Christmas is quickly approaching and Carol (Florence Henderson) is excited about singing her solo "O Come All Ye Faithful" at church. Then, with a day left to go before Christmas, she loses her voice. With everyone's holiday spirit significantly crushed, Cindy (Susan Olsen) decides to take the problem to the big man himself, Santa Claus. The kindhearted department store Santa (Hal Smith, who played Otis the drunk on The Andy Griffith Show) can't bring himself to deny little Cindy's request to restore her mom's voice and proclaims the wish granted. Without giving the ending away, suffice it to say that the producers woke up the next day to an early Christmas present of high Nielsen ratings. Airing on December 19, 1969, this episode turned The Brady Bunch into an audience favorite. ~ Matt Collar, Rovi

    The Brady Bunch: Katchoo
    Jan (Eve Plumb) is sick. Set upon by a mysterious allergy that leaves her sneezing uncontrollably, Jan stays home from school. Assuming she has a common cold, Carol (Florence Henderson) is perplexed when Jan's symptoms persist. Soon though, logic prevails and through a process of elimination, it is clear that Jan is either allergic to Tiger the family dog or Mike (Robert Reed). But, after an up-close sniff of Tiger, it is obvious who Jan can't stand. Even broken-hearted, pouting Brady kids might not be enough to keep Tiger on the cast list. Sadly, and ironically, the original real-life dog that portrayed Tiger was killed -- run over by a truck -- during the filming of this episode. ~ Matt Collar, Rovi

    The Brady Bunch: Eenie, Meenie, Mommy, Daddy
    Cindy (Susan Olsen) is chosen to play the fairy princess -- or, "faywee printheth," as she pronounces it -- in a school play. The Southern California population boom must have been in effect because she is only allowed to invite one parent to the performance. What a muddle for little Cindy. Will she go with blood and make Carol (Florence Henderson) happy, or go for diplomacy and make Mike (Robert Reed) feel welcome? Apparently based on a true story brought home by series creator Sherwood Schwartz's daughter, this episode originally aired October 10, 1969. Look closely for the future youngest member of The Partridge Family, Brian Forster, as an elf in the play. ~ Matt Collar, Rovi

    The Brady Bunch: Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore
    The proverbial third wheel, Alice (Ann B. Davis) begins to feel obsolete now that Mike's (Robert Reed) new wife, Carol (Florence Henderson), is around. In the hopes of making the new mom feel welcome and needed, Alice sends the kids to Carol to solve their every problem. Soon, Carol is mending every minor cut and hurt and feeling like a real mom. Yet, the sneaky act of diplomacy works all too well and the kids begin to ignore Alice altogether. The Bradys' must quickly band together to keep Alice from leaving her post, or they'll have to face the reality of Carol's Crisco-rich cooking. This is the last episode directed by John Rich. It originally aired on October 17, 1969. ~ Matt Collar, Rovi

    The Brady Bunch: Lost Locket, Found Locket
    Jan (Eve Plumb) is middling -- both sibling-wise and emotionally. She feels unloved and alone. Then, she receives a pretty gold locket in the mail from a secret admirer. Soon, she is filled with euphoria over the shiny trinket and nothing can bring her down -- except the disappearance of the locket. The soul-crushing loss leaves her utterly depressed. She painstakingly retraces her steps, searching for her bauble. Meanwhile, Mike (Robert Reed) and Carol (Florence Henderson) accuse each other of sending the locket. Then Jan finds the necklace; it turns out she dropped it out her window while gazing at the moon. With the golden charm back in her possession, Jan once again reels to heights of unimagined bliss. Not even the revelation that Alice (Ann B. Davis) -- a sympathetic middle child herself -- gave her the locket to cheer her up can bring down Jan. This beatific episode originally aired on March 20, 1970. ~ Matt Collar, Rovi

    The Brady Bunch: Confessions, Confessions
    Peter (Christopher Knight) throws a basketball around the living room and breaks Carol's (Florence Henderson) favorite vase in the process. Having ignored numerous warnings about playing ball indoors, Peter fears his camping trip will be canceled if the vase is discovered. Stealthily, he glues the many broken pieces back together and hopes for the best. Then, after a fateful watering by Carol, the vase leaks, exposing Peter's shoddy repair job. It looks like the vase is not the only thing that is "busted." However, Peter's siblings all heroically step up and martyr themselves as the real vase breakers. Yet, not every Brady can be the martyr. This episode originally aired on December 18, 1970. ~ Matt Collar, Rovi

    The Brady Bunch: Going, Going. . .Steady
    The first episode of the second season finds Marcia (Maureen McCormick) mooning over insect aficionado Harvey Klinger (Billy Corcoran). Uncharacteristically interested in a nerd, ice cream cone-and-puppy dog tails Marcia hasn't got a clue about how to net her bug boy. Then, with the other Bradys' help, she devises a plan to stick-pin the poor boy to her heart. Soon, Marcia has developed an avid interest in creepy crawlers, luring Harvey into her web at the same time. Mike (Robert Reed) and Carol (Florence Henderson) couldn't be happier, that is until Marcia tells them that she and Harvey are going steady. This episode originally aired on October 23, 1970. ~ Matt Collar, Rovi

    The Brady Bunch: The Tattletale
    Holier-than-thou Cindy (Susan Olsen) can't keep her little mouth shut about everyone else's business. Not since The Bad Seed has a blond child acted so devious: Not only does she rat out her classmates, brothers, and sisters, but she succeeds in temporarily screwing up Alice's (Ann B. Davis) relationship with longtime flirt Sam (Allen Melvin) the butcher. Alice receives a letter from the mailman informing her that she has won a contest. Excited by the news, Alice innocently hugs the mailman unaware that Cindy is spying on her all the while regaling the hug to Sam on the phone. Later, Alice is inexplicably stood up for a date by Sam. Soon, Cindy explains all and apparently learns her lesson -- perhaps all too well. Purportedly, actress Susan Olsen hates this episode, since the day after it aired none of her friends would speak to her at school, assuming she was actually a tattletale. ~ Matt Collar, Rovi

    The Brady Bunch: Call Me Irresponsible
    Greg (Barry Williams) wants a car. To save up the money, he takes a job at Mike's (Robert Reed) architectural firm. At first it looks like he'll soon be cruisin' in style and he even begins collecting gas money from his siblings for future rides. Then, he loses a set of Mike's design sketches and gets fired. Mike stands up for him and gets his job back. Greg thanks him by losing another set of sketches. This time he is able to find the sketches and returns them to the firm proving he is responsible -- even if it's in an after-the-fact kind of way. This time not even nepotism can save Greg from the ax and he is fired once again. This pre-gas shortage episode originally aired on October 30, 1970. ~ Matt Collar, Rovi

    The Brady Bunch: The Impractical Joker
    Jan (Eve Plumb) discovers her funny bone as she plays practical jokes on the other Bradys. At first the jokes are innocent pranks involving the standard fake bugs and requisite -- and admittedly funny -- disappearing ink gag. But the novelty soon wears thin as Jan hides Greg's (Barry Williams) pet mouse, Myron, in the laundry hamper. Soon, Alice discovers the rodent and quickly phones for an exterminator. Meanwhile, the Brady kids have all figured out that Myron is on the loose and go looking for him. Then, seeing that the exterminator has already completed his job, Jan fears that the worst joke has been played on her. Will Jan be "in the doghouse" with Greg until college or is that Myron in Tiger's pad? This episode originally aired on January 1, 1971. ~ Matt Collar, Rovi

    The Brady Bunch: A Fistful of Reasons
    Little lisping Cindy Brady (Susan Olsen) gets picked on by schoolmate Buddy (Russel Schulman) who taunts her with "Baby talk, baby talk, it's a wonder you can walk." Needless to say, she cries. Then Peter (Christopher Knight) comes to her defense against Buddy and comes away with a black eye. Concerned, Mike (Robert Reed) and Carol (Florence Henderson) pay a visit to Buddy's parents who demonstrate how bad apples don't fall too far from the tree. Forgoing civility, Mike teaches Peter how to land a mean right hook. Soon enough, Peter encounters Buddy at school and wallops the, well, tooth out of him. Now, Buddy has a lisp and Peter opportunistically uses Buddy's baby talk phrase against him. Ah, sweet justice. This episode originally aired on November 13, 1970. ~ Matt Collar, Rovi

    The Brady Bunch: The Un-Underground Movie
    Aspiring auteur Greg (Barry Williams) makes a film on the Pilgrims for a school project using the Brady clan as his cast. Maverick director that he is, Greg casts Mike (Robert Reed) and Carol (Florence Henderson) as John and Priscilla Alden, then provocatively casts against type -- and gender -- with Alice (Ann B. Davis) as Governor John Carver. Despite such inspired casting, "Our Pilgrim Fathers" is soon plagued with myriad production delays not the least of which is the arguing between the Brady siblings. Filming continues and even a key special effects scene involving the sinking of the Mayflower -- in the bathtub -- goes off without a hitch. This episode originally aired on October 16, 1970. ~ Matt Collar, Rovi

    The Brady Bunch: Sorry, Right Number
    With six socially active and talkative kids in a house, and only one phone, something's got to give. Apparently something already has -- a grotesquely huge phone bill of 30 dollars a month, and Mike (Robert Reed) wants to put a stop to it. First, he installs a second phone, but the lines are still hogged by his yacking kids. Then, Alice (Ann B. Davis) comes up with the brilliant solution of installing a pay phone in the Brady house. Originally airing on November 21, 1970, this episode marks the first appearance of Sam (Allan Melvin), the butcher. ~ Matt Collar, Rovi

    The Brady Bunch: 54-40 and Fight
    The Brady kids are collecting trading stamps like they're going to stop making them -- and they are. The trading stamp store decides to close its doors and the siblings have to move quickly to cash in their sticky vouchers -- or lose out on all the cool stamp store merchandise. However, separately they might as well frame the sheets of green squares for all the boys' 40 stamps and the girls' 54 stamps can buy them. So they decide to combine their stamps into one useful sum and buy a rowboat or a sewing machine. The argument over what to buy escalates until Mike (Robert Reed) weighs in with a level-headed solution -- build a house of cards. Yep, Greg (Barry Williams) and Marcia (Maureen McCormick) lead their respective teams in building a house out of playing cards. With one card added at a time, whoever causes the house to collapse gives up their stamps. The original airing of this classic Brady contest was January 9, 1970. ~ Matt Collar, Rovi

    The Brady Bunch: The Big Sprain
    Carol's (Florence Henderson) aunt is sick and needs some help, so Carol leaves Alice (Ann B. Davis) in charge of the family. Everything is fine until Alice slips on the kids' Chinese checker set and sprains her ankle. With Alice laid-up, the chores fall to the ever-capable hands of Mike (Robert Reed) and the kids. The problem is the boys barely know how to turn the stove on, let alone cook, and the girls make an interesting attempt to clean. Good thing Sam (Allan Melvin) the butcher is around to keep Alice preoccupied. This episode originally aired on February 6, 1970. ~ Matt Collar, Rovi

    The Brady Bunch: The Dropout
    Mike (Robert Reed) -- architect to the stars that he is -- is designing a house for Los Angeles Dodgers pitcher Don Drysdale. He happens to mention to the baseball star that Greg (Barry Williams) is a baseball nut and would love to meet him. Drysdale shows up at the Brady house, watches Greg pitch, and nonchalantly suggests that Greg might one day be a pro-ball player himself. Taking the encouragement as a directive from God, Greg immediately begins obsessing over his future in the majors. Assuming his phenomenal athletic abilities will propel him to baseball stardom, he lets his grades slip. Unable to convince Greg that he might want to finish school, Mike gets Drysdale to show up again and counsel Greg about the many downsides of professional baseball. This episode originally aired on September 25, 1970. ~ Matt Collar, Rovi

    The Brady Bunch: The Babysitters
    With six kids, Mike (Robert Reed) and Carol (Florence Henderson) rarely get a chance to have some fun as a couple. So they are excited when they snag some tickets to a play. Their excitement is short-lived though as Alice (Ann B. Davis) also has plans for the evening and no baby sitters are available. Then, Greg (Barry Williams) and Marcia (Maureen McCormick) enthusiastically volunteer to babysit their siblings. With the problem solved, Mike and Carol leave for the play. Soon, the younger Brady kids mount a revolt against the all-too-in-charge Greg and Marcia. Meanwhile, Mike and Carol, unable to relax about leaving the kids home alone, leave the play just in time to quell an all-out insurrection. This episode originally aired on October 2, 1970. ~ Matt Collar, Rovi

    The Brady Bunch: The Treasure of Sierra Avenue
    While playing football in the street, Bobby (Michael Lookinland) discovers a wallet stuffed full of cash -- 1,100 dollars full. It appears as if Bobby has struck it rich. Then, every other Brady seems to think they deserve a piece of Bobby's newfound wealth. He refuses to share it with the girls who, of course, give the boys the silent treatment. No matter, Greg (Barry Williams) and Peter's (Christopher Knight) mooching takes care of what little money Bobby has left. It looks as if Bobby is going to get to keep a little of the booty for himself when an old coot named Mr. Stoner (Victor Kilian) shows up to bogart the rest of the cash -- including the leather wallet. The nerve of that guy, it was only his life savings. Bobby loses the wallet and the money, but gains so much more from the experience. This episode originally aired on November 6, 1970. ~ Matt Collar, Rovi

    The Brady Bunch: The Hero
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: Mike's Horror-Scope
    Will a mysterious and enigmatic woman steal Mike (Robert Reed) away from Carol (Florence Henderson)? Carol thinks so after reading Mike's horoscope in the newspaper. It says that Mike needs to be on the lookout for a "strange and fascinating" woman in his life. Enter flamboyant cosmetics designer Beebe Gallini (Abbe Lane) along with her striking red hair, bizarre accent, and her even more bizarre request. She wants brilliant architect Mike to build her a new factory that will truly exemplify her cosmetic line: a pink building with a "fluffy" roof. This colorful episode originally aired on January 16, 1970. ~ Matt Collar, Rovi

    The Brady Bunch: The Undergraduate
    Greg (Barry Williams) sulks around the Brady house, staring off into space and not paying attention to others: He's in love. Alice thinks he is sick until she discovers a love note he wrote to a mysterious Linda. Soon, it is assumed that a girl at school is the object of his affection. Well, she is a girl at school -- Greg's teacher, Linda O'Hara (Gigi Perreau). All Greg can think about is Ms. O'Hara, until her boyfriend -- L.A. Dodger first baseman Wes Parker, playing himself -- shows up. This home run of an episode originally aired on January 23, 1970. ~ Matt Collar, Rovi

    The Brady Bunch: To Move or Not to Move
    Mike (Robert Reed) may have designed a great house, but with six kids crammed between three bedrooms -- and only one bathroom -- it just isn't big enough. After the kids complain about not having enough room, Mike decides to sell the house. Soon, after another kid meeting, the Brady siblings decide they were acting like jerks and would hate to leave their house. This prompts Bobby (Michael Lookinland) and Cindy (Susan Olsen) to don white sheets and cavort around the house to scare off interested buyers. The Brady house actually exists in the San Fernando Valley, but the upstairs window is just an added prop. Inflated California housing prices not withstanding, this episode originally aired on March 6, 1970. ~ Matt Collar, Rovi

    The Brady Bunch: Tiger, Tiger!
    Tiger is missing -- and for about 15 episodes. In any case, the Bradys want their lovable mutt back and will do about anything to find him. They offer a reward in the newspaper for exactly $42.76. They also fan out within their neighborhood subdivision on foot, bike, and in the station wagon looking for him. When they come back empty-handed, they begin to assume the worst. That is, until Peter (Christopher Knight) discovers the AWOL pooch proudly tending after his recently born family of puppies. The dog that portrayed Tiger in this episode was actually a stand-in, the original Tiger having departed for doggy heaven during the filming of "Katchoo." This episode originally aired on January 30, 1970. ~ Matt Collar, Rovi

    The Brady Bunch: Father of the Year
    As well as sporting sharp cardigan sweaters and sharkskin suits, Mike (Robert Reed) is a great stepfather. Marcia (Maureen McCormick) knows it, and upon seeing a Father of the Year contest in the newspaper, decides to enter him in it. (For another episode with the newspaper, see "Dear Libby.") Then she sneaks out of the house one night -- stealthy in fuzzy yellow slippers -- to mail the entry. Mike finds out about her late night excursion and demands an explanation. Marcia won't tell, hoping to keep the contest a secret, and is summarily grounded. Won't he be sorry. This episode originally aired on January 2, 1970. ~ Matt Collar, Rovi

    The Brady Bunch: What Goes Up
    Bobby (Michael Lookinland) wants to join Peter's (Christopher Knight) tree house club. Peter talks his buddies into letting his little brother join. Yet, before Bobby even has time to enjoy the view, he topples out of the tree and sprains his ankle. He also limps off with a severe fear of heights. Soon, all the Bradys band together and attempt to cure Bobby of his fear. They all trampoline and Greg even tries to tempt Bobby skyward with some stilts. Bobby isn't having any of it, until his pet bird, Budgie, flies his coop and lands in the backyard tree. Without enough time to think of the risk he's taking, Bobby ambles up the tree to save Budgie and finds his courage waiting for him at the top. This episode on acrophobia originally aired on December 11, 1970. ~ Matt Collar, Rovi

    The Brady Bunch: The Not-So-Ugly Duckling
    Jan (Eve Plumb) has her first crush on classmate Clark Tyson (Mark Gruner). Wouldn't you know it, Clark likes Marcia (Maureen McCormick). Convinced that it is her freckles that have put Clark off her, she attempts to dissolve them away with lemon juice. Failing that, Jan simply decides to invent a boyfriend -- "George Glass" -- to prove she is desirable. Then, Marcia discovers that it is not Jan's freckles that Clark does not like, but the way she dresses. Soon, Jan gets a fresh makeover thanks to Marcia's keen fashion sense and Clark cannot take his eyes off her. This episode originally aired on November 20, 1970. ~ Matt Collar, Rovi

    The Brady Bunch: The Grass Is Always Greener
    Mike (Robert Reed) and Carol (Florence Henderson) squabble over who has the harder job. If you're thinking the architect or the homemaker, you're wrong -- they mean "mommy" or "daddy." Quickly, logic prevails, as it always does in the Brady household, and a plan is hatched to answer the argument once and for all. Carol suits up in her best gray sweatsuit and heads to the ball diamond with the boys for baseball practice. Mike dons an apron to help the girls with their cooking project. Needless to say, not just once are eggs, balls, and egos dropped in the name of gender equity. This episode originally aired on March 13, 1970. ~ Matt Collar, Rovi

    The Brady Bunch: Brace Yourself
    Marcia (Maureen McCormick) gets braces on her teeth and assumes she's the ugliest thing going. Her low self-esteem falls even lower after Alan (Mike Robertson), her date to the school dance, cancels at the last minute -- albeit to go on a family vacation. Mike (Robert Reed) and Carol (Florence Henderson) try to convince her that she is still pretty despite her fangs of steel. Attempting to help, not less than three Bradys set up Marcia with a new date to the dance. They all arrive to take metal-mouth Marcia out to boogie. Then, as if Marcia really had anything to worry about in the first place, Alan shows up -- with braces. Apparently, an unexpected flip over the handlebars of his dirt bike took care of his vacation plans. This episode originally aired on February 13, 1970. ~ Matt Collar, Rovi

    The Brady Bunch: The Slumber Caper
    Marcia (Maureen McCormick) wants to host her first slumber party. Despite her brothers' protestations against the cooty-inviting event, Mike (Robert Reed) and Carol (Florence Henderson) agree. Then at school, Marcia's teacher discovers "Mrs. Denton...a Hippopotamus" written under a picture of a hippo on Marcia's art project and is none too flattered by the comparison. Marcia denies ever writing the slur, but soon Mike and Carol receive a call from the school principal and the slumber party is canceled. Yet, after Marcia pleads her case to mom and dad, the party is on. Meanwhile, the boys plan a few surprises for Marcia and her friends. Needless to say, ghouls, itch powder, and an unexpected confession of guilt make for one memorable episode which aired on October 9, 1970. Look for E.G. Marshall as Principal Stoner, and at the slumber party Robert Reed's daughter, Carolyn Reed, as Karen, Florence Henderson's daughter, Barbara Bernstein, as Ruthie, and producer Sherwood Schwartz's daughter, Hope Sherwood, as Jenny. This episode originally aired on October 9, 1970. ~ Matt Collar, Rovi

    The Brady Bunch: The Possible Dream
    Cindy (Susan Olsen) accidentally donates Marcia's (Maureen McCormick) diary to the Salvation Army Book Drive. Detailed within the pages of Marcia's private tome is the lurid and utterly provocative admission that her "dream of dreams" is to one day be the Mrs. Desi Arnaz Jr. Embarrassed, Marcia immediately begins excluding Cindy from her life. Soon, all the Bradys are out searching every used bookstore for the diary. Meanwhile, Alice (Ann B. Davis) implausibly pulls some apron strings in the world of celebrity housekeepers to get Mr. Arnaz Jr. to show up at the Brady house and restore Marcia's dignity. This episode originally aired on February 27, 1970. ~ Matt Collar, Rovi

    The Brady Bunch: Sergeant Emma
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: Cindy Brady, Lady
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: My Sister, Benedict Arnold
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: The Personality Kid
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: Juliet Is the Sun
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: And Now, a Word From Our Sponsor
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: My Fair Opponent
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: The Fender Benders
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: Ghost Town, U.S.A.
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: Grand Canyon or Bust
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: The Brady Braves
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: The Wheeler-Dealer
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: The Private Ear
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: Click
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: The Not-So-Rose-Colored Glasses
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: The Teeter-Totter Caper
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: Big Little Man
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: Dough Re Mi
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: Jan's Aunt Jenny
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: The Big Bet
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: Our Son, the Man
    Now that Greg (Barry Williams) is all grown up and in high school, he wants his own pad. Barring a Bohemian loft on the Sunset Strip, Mike's (Robert Reed) office will do. Greg quickly redecorates Mike's architectural den with hippie beads and black lights. Feeling his newly independent oats, Greg attempts another grown-up activity -- he asks a senior out. After he is passed over by the "older" woman for a "real" hippie (i.e., someone whose bell-bottoms don't come courtesy of Botany 500), he decides it's time to dump Sears and Roebuck for Seals and Croft. Soon, he is sporting a groovy headband and a natty fringed suede vest. Still, an afro does not a counterculture radical make and he strikes out a second time with the senior. Will Greg take the rejection hard, become disillusioned with his vapid bourgeois suburban upbringing, smoke too much pot, and hitchhike out of syndication? Well, at least not this season. This episode originally aired on February 5, 1971. ~ Matt Collar, Rovi

    The Brady Bunch: The Liberation of Marcia Brady
    Marcia (Maureen McCormick) is randomly interviewed by the local news about gender equality and proclaims that, "Anything a man can do, a woman can do better." Upon viewing the newscast, her chauvinist brothers challenge Marcia to stand by her words. Soon, Marcia joins her brothers on a Frontier Scout excursion. At the same time, Peter (Christopher Knight) is experiencing some liberation of his own as he dons a dress green and knee socks to prove he can outshine Marcia as a Sunflower Girl. Needless to say, Marcia has an easier albeit rough time sparking a fire with the Frontier men than Peter does selling cookies door to door in drag. This pop culture take on women's lib originally aired on February 12, 1971. ~ Matt Collar, Rovi

    The Brady Bunch: Her Sister's Shadow
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: Lights Out
    Cindy (Susan Olsen) views a magician make his assistant disappear in a closet and irrationally assumes that the woman is now lost for good in a dark black vortex. Now harboring a deep-seated fear of magic and the dark, Cindy will only sleep with the lights on. Meanwhile, in an ironic and cruelly convenient plot twist, Peter (Christopher Knight) is preparing his own magic show for the school pageant -- complete with a disappearing Jan (Eve Plumb) trick. Then, on the day of the show, Jan sprains her ankle and cannot perform the trick. Enter Cindy, scared to death but determined to help her brother finish his act. Will Cindy disappear into dark obscurity? This episode originally aired on February 19, 1971. ~ Matt Collar, Rovi

    The Brady Bunch: Getting Davy Jones
    As the president of the Fillmore Junior High Davy Jones Fan Club, Marcia (Maureen McCormick) insanely promises to get the Monkees' crooner to perform at prom. She attempts to snag the pop star by stalking him at a local TV station and even posing as a bellboy at his hotel. Having no luck and feeling the pressure, she finally breaks down, whining her story to a local recording studio engineer -- Davy listening in all the while on headphones. Good guy Davy Jones soon shows up at the Bradys' suburban abode to save Marcia from fan club impeachment. This is one of the most popular and well-known Brady episodes; in addition to Jones, look for Marcia Wallace -- Carol on The Bob Newhart Show -- as Marcia's teacher. ~ Matt Collar, Rovi

    The Brady Bunch: Coming-Out Party
    The Bradys get invited on a fishing trip by Mike's (Robert Reed) boss, Mr. Phillips (Jack Collins). Before they even get a glimpse of his boat, Cindy's (Susan Olsen) incessant sneezing belies a more serious problem -- tonsillitis. Not only that, but the doctor notices that Carol (Florence Henderson) needs to get the little buggers pulled as well. The trip is postponed. The catch is that Carol and Cindy have to keep quiet for a week to heal after surgery -- but gabby Carol can't shut up for five minutes. Soon, Mike is calling home pretending to be Carol's gossipy friend, Ellie, to test Carol and reprimanding her when she answers. Then, Mr. Phillips calls and Carol -- assuming it's Mike again in disguise -- tells him that she'd never set foot on his old barge. Mike's appearance at home alerts her to her huge mistake. Mike calls Mr. Phillips and apologizes to no avail. Then, Mr. Phillips turns up at the Brady house with flowers to apologize, "You can insult a man's wife, but never his boat." How touching. This episode originally aired on January 29, 1970. ~ Matt Collar, Rovi

    The Brady Bunch: Tell It Like It Is
    Carol (Florence Henderson) writes a story about her chaotic, merged family life for a women's magazine. The family is ecstatic about her freelance success, but the celebration is premature as the magazine rejects the piece for being too unbelievable. Then, after a rewrite portraying the Brady household as picture perfect, the article is accepted. Soon, some editors from the magazine show up at the Bradys' home to finish up the story and are stunned by the madness they encounter. They quickly reconsider printing the story once again. Apparently though, the first draft now seems more plausible and the article runs in the magazine -- as a feature story. This episode originally aired on March 26, 1971. ~ Matt Collar, Rovi

    The Brady Bunch: The Drummer Boy
    Although this episode ostensibly revolves around little Bobby's (Michael Lookinland) newfound career aspiration as a drummer -- his incessant pounding drives the other Bradys from the house -- Peter (Christopher Knight) is the real focal point. As a member of the school football team, Peter is ridiculed by his teammates as a wuss for also belonging to the glee club. Hmm, sounds like Peter could use some moral support from a professional sports star comfortable enough with his manhood that he can also carry a tune in public and wear some really groovy bell-bottoms. Enter -- no, not Rudy Galinda -- L.A. Rams defensive end Deacon Jones. Jones shows up to hang with Peter's coach and gives Peter a few pointers on what makes a real man; presumably, singing makes the cut. This episode originally aired on January 22, 1971. ~ Matt Collar, Rovi

    The Brady Bunch: Where There's Smoke
    Greg (Barry Williams) is pressured into smoking cigarettes by his bandmates. Then Cindy (Susan Olsen) and Jan (Eve Plumb) catch him sucking on a cancer stick. Soon, it is time for Mike (Robert Reed) and Carol (Florence Henderson) to sit Greg down and talk some sense into him about the dangers of smoking. Convinced he really only lit up through peer pressure, they warn Greg not to do it again. Meanwhile, Greg and his band, the Banana Convention, are readying to perform at their first show. His future looks rockin' until a pack of cigs falls out of his coat pocket. To make matters worse, Carol is also the chairperson of the school's antismoking campaign. Tensions run high at the Brady house until the truth arises. It turns out that the jacket belonged to another Banana -- the drummer -- and Greg's off the hook. This episode originally aired on January 8, 1971. ~ Matt Collar, Rovi

    The Brady Bunch: Will the Real Jan Brady Please Stand Up?
    Once again, Jan (Eve Plumb) succumbs to depression over a badly perceived self-image (as in The Not-So-Ugly Duckling episode). This time she thinks that as the middle child she is ignored by society. Oh, and her blonde hair color has got to go. To solve the problem, Jan forgoes messy, expensive hair dyes and useless counseling by overrated psychiatric professionals. Instead, she buys a brunette wig. Convinced she will make a big splash at home and at a party, she is utterly devastated when the wig induces the partygoers into uncontrolled fits of laughter. Even brother Bobby (Michael Lookinland) likens the hairpiece to a "sleeping skunk." Then, in a kind gesture of compassion -- or just out of fear that they might have pushed her over the edge -- the kids from the party show up at the Bradys' doorstep to apologize. They even praise Jan's golden locks and send her spirits soaring, for a little while at least. Look for Marcia Wallace as the wig saleslady in this episode which originally aired on January 15, 1971. ~ Matt Collar, Rovi

    The Brady Bunch: The Power of the Press
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: Alice's September Song
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: Double Parked
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: The Winner
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: Cyrano De Brady
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: Today, I Am a Freshman
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: Tiki Caves
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: Pass the Tabu
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: Hawaii Bound
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: Fright Night
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: Greg's Triangle
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: Goodbye, Alice, Hello
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: Career Fever
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: Jan, The Only Child
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: Show Must Go On??
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: Everyone Can't Be George Washington
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: Adios, Johnny Bravo
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: Mail Order Hero
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: Getting Greg's Goat
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: Marcia Gets Creamed
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: My Brother's Keeper
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: Quarterback Sneak
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: Love and the Older Man
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: Greg Gets Grounded
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: Amateur Night
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: Bobby's Hero
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: How to Succeed in Business
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: Never Too Young
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: Snow White and the Seven Bradys
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: The Subject Was Noses
    Marcia (Maureen McCormick) accepts a date to a school dance with nice-but-nerdy Charley (Stuart Getz). Then she is also asked out by popular football star Doug (Nicholas Hammond). Catching the hots for Doug, Marcia asks Greg (Barry Williams) how to let Charley off easy. Taking Greg's sage advice, Marcia quickly tells Charley that "something suddenly came up." Soon, she's catching some bad karma, literally, in the form of a football in the nose. Doug takes one look at Marcia's blimping proboscis and "suddenly something" comes up and he can't take her to the dance. Will Marcia apologize to Charley and go to the prom? Will the swelling in her nose go down? Will she ever play football again? This episode contains the oft-quoted "oh -- my nose!" moment. Nicholas Hammond later went on to portray television's first live action Spiderman. ~ Matt Collar, Rovi

    The Brady Bunch: Law and Disorder
    Bobby's (Michael Lookinland) job as safety monitor at school turns him into a fascistic stickler for the rules. Donning his safety monitor sash, he is soon turning his classmates in for such major infractions as chewing gum and running in the hallways. Ironically, this includes sister Cindy (Susan Olsen) who suffered her own bout of big head-itis in "The Tattle Tale." Then, caught up in his dweeby ideological fervor, Bobby brings his job home, ratting out his brothers and sisters for every forgotten curfew and chore. Finally, "by-the-book" Bobby must ignore a "No Trespassing" sign to save a classmate's kitten trapped in a condemned building. Mussing his best blue suit in the process, he attempts to clean it before anyone finds out that he broke a rule -- soaking the laundry room in an tidal wave of soap suds. ~ Matt Collar, Rovi

    The Brady Bunch: Miss Popularity
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: The Elopement
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: The Cincinnati Kids
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: Try, Try Again
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: Room at the Top
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: You Can't Win 'Em All
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: Peter and the Wolf
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: Great Earring Caper
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: You're Never Too Old
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: Kelly's Kids
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: The Driver's Seat
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: Out of This World
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: Welcome Aboard
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: Two Petes in a Pod
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: Top Secret
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: The Snooperstar
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: The Hustler
    No synopsis available.

    The Brady Bunch: The Hairbrained Scheme
    No synopsis available.

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  • Hogan's Heroes: Is There a Traitor in the House? (1969)
  • Hogan's Heroes: At Last--Schultz Knows Something (1969)
  • Hogan's Heroes: The Merry Widow (1970)
  • Hogan's Heroes: Crittendon's Commandos (1970)
  • Hogan's Heroes: Klink's Escape (1970)
  • Hogan's Heroes: Cuisine a la Stalag 13 (1970)
  • Hogan's Heroes: The Experts (1970)
  • Hogan's Heroes: Klink's Masterpiece (1970)
  • Hogan's Heroes: Lady Chitterly's Lover, Part One (1970)
  • Hogan's Heroes: Gowns By Yvette (1970)
  • Hogan's Heroes: Lady Chitterly's Lover, Part Two (1970)
  • Hogan's Heroes: The Gestapo Takeover (1970)
  • Hogan's Heroes: Kommandant Schultz (1970)
  • Hogan's Heroes: Eight O'Clock and All Is Well (1970)
  • Hogan's Heroes: The Big Record (1970)
  • Hogan's Heroes: It's Dynamite (1970)
  • Hogan's Heroes: Operation Tiger (1970)
  • Hogan's Heroes: How's the Weather? (1970)
  • Hogan's Heroes: The Big Broadcast (1970)
  • Hogan's Heroes: The Gypsy (1970)
  • Hogan's Heroes: The Dropouts (1970)
  • Hogan's Heroes: Get Fit or Go Fight (1970)
  • Hogan's Heroes: Fat Hermann, Go Home (1970)
  • Hogan's Heroes: The Softer They Fall (1970)
  • Hogan's Heroes: One Army at a Time (1970)
  • Hogan's Heroes: Standing Room Only (1970)
  • Hogan's Heroes: Six Lessons From Madame LaGrange (1970)
  • Hogan's Heroes: The Sergeant's Analyst (1970)
  • Hogan's Heroes: To Russia Without Love (1971)
  • Hogan's Heroes: Klink for the Defense (1971)
  • Hogan's Heroes: The Kamikazes are Coming (1971)
  • Hogan's Heroes: Kommandant Gertrude (1971)
  • Hogan's Heroes: That's No Lady, That's My Spy (1971)
  • Hogan's Heroes: Look at the Pretty Snowflakes (1971)
  • Hogan's Heroes: Rockets or Romance (1971)
  • Hogan's Heroes: Easy Come, Easy Go (1971)
  • Hogan's Heroes: The Meister Spy (1971)
  • Hogan's Heroes: Hogan's Double Life (1971)

    Hogan's Heroes: The Informer
    Hogan's Heroes began its six-season run on September 17, 1965, with its black-and-white pilot episode, "The Informer." Colonel Hogan and the gang welcome a new prisoner named Wagner (Noam Pitlik) to Stalag 13 (here referred to as "Camp 13"). After giving the newcomer a guided tour of the barracks -- and of the inmates' covert espionage operation and prisoner-escape service -- Hogan discovers that Wagner is a spy for the Gestapo. Quickly, the other prisoners cook up a scheme to discredit Wagner in the eyes of Colonel Klink and the rest of the Germans. Worth noting in this inaugural episode is the more sharply adversarial relationship between Hogan and Klink (who is not as much of a buffoon as he'd be in subsequent episode) and the fact that Carter (Larry Hovis) is a lieutenant rather than a sergeant. "The Informer" was written by Richard M. Powell and series creators Bernard Fein and Albert S. Ruddy, from a story by Fein and Ruddy. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: The Flight of the Valkyrie
    Bernard Fox makes his first appearance as British martinet Col. Crittendon, the new senior POW at Stalag 13. Crittendon's never-ending efforts to escape may mess up Hogan's plans to help a German baroness named Lili (Louise Troy) defect to England. The trick is to cool off Crittendon while simultaneously keeping the Gestapo in the dark about Hogan's underground activities. Written by Richard M. Powell, "The Flight of the Valkyrie" first aired on October 15, 1965. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Anchors Aweigh, Men of Stalag 13
    Hogan is assigned to smuggle British POW Captain Michaels (Michael St. Clair) -- and the prototype for a new German gunsight -- out of Stalag 13. Unfortunately, this requires Michaels to sail across 80 miles of ocean, and the underground's submarine is out of commission. The solution: Hogan convinces Klink that the camp is in dire need of a new officer's club -- built in the shape of a yacht. Written by David Chandler and Jack H. Robinson, "Anchors Aweigh, Men of Stalag 13" was first telecast on December 31, 1965. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Reservations are Required
    Agreeing to help two POWs escape, Hogan is unexpectedly saddled with 20 potential escapees. Simultaneously, Klink tightens security around Stalag 13, cutting off all possible exit routes. Hogan's plans to create a diversion may be undermined when one of the escaping prisoners, Sgt. Braden (Robert Hogan) decides to "jump the gun." Written by Laurence Marks, "Reservations Are Required" was originally broadcast on December 24, 1965. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Oil for the Lamps of Hogan
    To avoid bombardment from the Allies, the Germans intend to construct a synthetic fuel plant at Stalag 13. Realizing that this will uproot the prisoners -- and foul up his espionage operations -- Hogan schemes to sabotage the construction project by convincing Klink that there is oil on the camp's land. This scheme requires the rest of Hogan's operatives to stage an elaborate phony air raid. Written by Laurence Marks, "Oil for the Lamps of Hogan" originally aired on December 17, 1965. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Hogan's Hofbrau
    Hogan's plans to get information on the plans of a nearby Panzer division require him to "visit" a local hofbrau. His mission coincides with a scheme concocted by two crooked Panzer officers to extort a large sum of money from the tremulous Colonel Klink. Thanks to the machinations of scriptwriter Laurence Marks, Hogan is able to use the officers' greed to his own advantage. Frank Marth and Willard Sage are respectively cast as Captain Milheiser and Lt. Schmidt. "Hogan's Hofbrau" first aired on December 10, 1965. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: The Scientist
    Maurice Marsac plays the title character, captured French scientist Henry Dubois, who is forced to work with the Germans out of fear for the life of his daughter Marie (Jayne Massey). Hogan and his men set out to rescue the scientist and his daughter and to feed the Germans false scientific results. To that end, Hogan works out an intricate scheme whereby LeBeau will impersonate Dubois and hopefully hoodwink top German scientist Professor Altman (Parley Baer). Written by Laurence Marks, "The Scientist" was originally telecast on December 3, 1965. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Happiness Is a Warm Sergeant
    When Newkirk gets Schultz drunk as part of an underground mission, the corpulent sergeant is discharged for incompetence. The new camp sergeant -- a sharp-witted, no-nonsense type named Krebs (Norman Alden) -- poses a serious threat to Hogan's espionage activities. The POWs plot to discredit Krebs and restore the dumb and harmless Schultz without exposing their covert operations. Written by Laurence Marks, "Happiness Is a Warm Sergeant" originally aired on November 26, 1965. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: The Late Inspector General
    Not wanting to be assigned a tougher and smarter commandant than Col. Klink, Hogan convinces German Inspector General Von Platzen (John Dehner) that Klink is a stern disciplinarian. The plan works too well, and the General insists that Klink be promoted and transferred. All this may well foul up Hogan's plans to blow up a munitions train. Written by Richard M. Powell, "The Late Inspector General" originally aired on October 8, 1965. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Kommandant of the Year
    Confident that the Allies won't bomb a POW camp, the Germans stash an experimental V-2 rocket at Stalag 13. Hogan's London headquarters send allied scientist Dr. Schneider (Woodrow Parfrey) into the camp to photograph and destroy the rocket. To get the scientist past the security guards, Hogan takes advantage of the fact that Stalag 13 has been named one of Germany's top ten prison camps and stages a phony award ceremony for gullible Colonel Klink. Future Little House on the Prairie and Highway to Heaven co-star Victor French has a small part as a commando. Written by Laurence Marks, "Kommandant of the Year" first aired on October 1, 1965. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Hold That Tiger
    Impressed by Klink's boasts that the German's new Tiger Tank will hasten the end of the war, Hogan is determined to get hold of the tank's blueprints and pass them along to the Allies. This requires the inmates to steal one of the tanks, dissemble the vehicle, then reassemble and dispose of the tank right under the noses of Klink, Schultz, and General Hofstader (Henry Rico Cattani). Arlene Martel co-stars as an underground operative who, by a wild coincidence, happens to be known as Tiger. Written by Richard M. Powell, "Hold That Tiger" originally aired on September 24, 1965. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: The Prisoner's Prisoner
    Caught in the act of completing a British commando's sabotage mission, Hogan and Carter are forced to capture the witness to their mission, German General Schmidt (Roger C. Carmel). The two heroes manage to smuggle Schmidt into the general POW population in camp, keeping him at bay by fabricating a phony illness. The problem: Once Hogan has pumped Schmidt for valuable information, how can he get him back out of the camp without arousing Klink's suspicions? Written by R.S. Allen and Harvey Bullock, "The Prisoner's Prisoner" originally aired on October 22, 1965. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Top Hat, White Tie and Bomb Sight
    Klink bugs the POWs' quarters, making it impossible for Hogan to relay vital information to London. As a means of getting the info to the Allies, Hogan convinces Klink that he has been won over to the German side. In exchange for what he knows about the Underground, Hogan requests a rest-and-relaxation visit to a local village -- while Klink is kept preoccupied with the phony information dispensed by the rest of Hogan's heroes. Sigrid Valdis, who later took over the role of Klink's secretary Hilda, is here seen as Gretchen. Written by Laurence Marks, "Top Hat, White Tie and Bomb Sight" first aired on November 19, 1965. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Go Light on the Heavy Water
    Again counting on the fact that the Allies won't bomb a POW camp, the Germans bring a tightly guarded truck containing a barrel of heavy water into Stalag 13. Suspecting that the water might be used for a weapon of some sort, Hogan must find a way to get rid of it. The answer: Convince Klink that the radioactive water is a delicious health tonic! Prolific Hanna-Barbera voice actor John Stephenson appears as Captain Mueller. Written by Arthur Julian, "Go Light on the Heavy Water" originally aired on November 12, 1965. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Movies Are Your Best Escape
    Hogan wants to get photos of the highly important documents in the briefcase carried by visiting German General Von Kaplow (Henry Corden). Unfortunately, the general is taking no chances: He has chained the briefcase to his wrist, and will not let it out of his sight. Finally, Hogan hits upon the idea of diverting Von Kaplow's attention at a dinner party held in Col. Klink's honor. Future MASH regular William Christopher makes the first of several Hogan's Heroes supporting appearance, this time in the role of Lt. Donner. Written by Laurence Marks, "Movies Are Your Best Escape" first aired on November 5, 1965. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: German Bridge Is Falling Down
    Hogan's efforts to blow up a strategic German bridge are foiled at every turn. Finally, he decides to destroy the target single-handedly -- using the enemy's own ammunition supplies. This is the episode in which the POWs form a human arrow without arousing the suspicions of the dumb Klink and the dumber Schultz. Written by Laurence Marks, "German Bridge Is Falling Down" made its first network appearance on October 29, 1965. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: The Pizza Parlor
    Hans Conried guest stars as Major Bonacelli, a pacifistic Italian POW commandant. Assigned to study under Stalag 17's Col. Klink, Bonacelli would much sooner defect to Switzerland. Ordered to extract information from Bonacelli, Hogan tries to convince the major to work on behalf of the Allies by bribing him with LeBeau's mouth-watering pizza. Written by Arthur Julian, "The Pizza Parlor" first aired on February 11, 1966. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: A Tiger Hunt in Paris, Part One
    In the first episode of a two-part story, Hogan sneaks into Paris to carry out his latest assignment: To locate several secret German fighter bases. In the course of events, he also attempts to free underground agent Tiger (Arlene Martel) from her brutal Gestapo captors. Hogan's mission is complicated by the presence of sexy Russian spy Marya (Nita Talbot in her series debut), who intends to get the necessary information for her country first. John Dehner heads the guest cast as Col. Backscheider. Written by Richard M. Powell, part one of "A Tiger Hunt in Paris" first aired on November 18, 1966. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: How to Cook a German Goose by Radar
    Hogan and his men simply cannot warm up to the newest POW, a cranky, selfish, and arrogant American corporal named Walter Tillman (J. Pat O'Malley). Eventually, Hogan finds out that the crotchety old "corporal" is really a general in disguise, assigned to aid Hogan in an important sabotage mission. Unfortunately, by this time Klink has responded to the prisoners' complaints and has ordered Tillman to be transferred. Written by Phil Sharp, "How to Cook a German Goose by Radar" was first telecast on March 4, 1966. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Happy Birthday, Adolf
    The Allies plan an exploratory raid on German-occupied soil as a "birthday present" for Adolf Hitler. Hogan's role in the proceedings is to knock out a huge heavy-artillery emplacement, and to do this he creates a diversion: An elaborate birthday party for Der Fuhrer, complete with wine, women, and more women. Howard Caine, who later joined the regular cast as Col. Hochstetter, is here seen as Major Keitel. Written by Laurence Marks, "Happy Birthday, Adolf" first aired on January 7, 1966. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: The Gold Rush
    Hogan discovers that a huge shipment of confiscated French gold has been stored in a bank near Stalag 17. In order to appropriate the bullion for the Allies, Hogan convinces Klink that the gold would be "safer" within the walls of the camp. The rest of Hogan's scheme is contingent upon those conveniently loose bricks around Klink's quarters. Written by Laurence Marks and directed by comic actor Howard Morris, "The Gold Rush" originally aired on January 14, 1966. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: The Prince from the Phone Company
    Series regular Ivan Dixon appears in a dual role as POW Kinchloe and the visiting Prince Makabana from Africa. Kidnapping the prince, Hogan has Kinchloe pose as the potentate during a meeting with the German top brass, who hope to open a submarine base in Makabana's country. Hogan's plans threaten to come apart at the seams when the Prince's wife, Princess Yawanda (Isabelle Cooley), unexpectedly shows up. Written by Richard M. Powell, "The Prince From the Phone Company" first aired on March 18, 1966. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Psychic Kommandant
    Confined to their barracks, Hogan and his men discover the reason for this step-up in security: a prototype for the Luftwaffe's new silent aircraft has been stored at Stalag 13. Realizing that this weapon will wreak untold havoc on the Allies, Hogan must convince the Gestapo that the new aircraft is worthless. Part of his plan depends on Klink's belief that he has ESP -- or at least, he will believe this once Hogan's men have gone to work on him. First aired on March 11, 1966, "Psychic Kommandant" was written by Phil Sharp. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Art for Hogan's Sake
    General Burkhalter "liberates" a priceless French painting from the Louvre, intending to add the masterpiece to Hermann Goering's private collection. Hogan and LeBeau take it upon themselves to keep the painting from falling into the wrong hands. To do this, our heroes pay a covert visit to Paris and use Sgt. Schultz as their unwitting dupe (when has Schultz ever been a witting dupe???) First telecast on December 30, 1966, "Art for Hogan's Sake" was written by Laurence Marks. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Information Please
    General Burkhalter sets up a trap whereby a security leak is traced to Stalag 13. This gives Burkhalter enough ammunition to replace Klink with a tougher and more efficient camp commandant. It is up to Hogan to discredit the replacement and ferret out the "mole" within his own ranks. Familiar Hanna-Barbera voice-over actor John Stephenson, a frequent Hogan's Heroes guest star, is here cast as Major Kohler. Written by Laurence Marks, "Information Please" first aired on December 23, 1966. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: The Schultz Brigade
    Two of his fellow POW commanders, Burmeister (Parely Baer) and Bussie (Lou Krugman), try to involve Klink in a plot to discredit General Burkhalter. Unfortunately, the general gets wind of the scheme and sentences Klink to a firing squad. In order to rescue Klink -- thereby avoiding a tougher and smarter commander being assigned to Stalag 13 -- Hogan works a little subtle blackmail on Sgt. Schultz. Written by Richard M. Powell, "The Schultz Brigade" first aired on September 23, 1966. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Diamonds in the Rough
    Mercenary Gestapo agent Major Hegel (Paul Lambert demands that the Allies give him $1 million worth of industrial diamonds, lest he blow the whistle on Hogan's espionage operation. Left with no alternative, Hogan and his men agree to steal the precious gems. Ulla Stromstredt is cast as Hegel's gorgeous partner in crime Myra. Scriptwriter Laurence Marks managed to sustain the series' high humor content while still incorporating two violent off-screen deaths. "Diamonds in the Rough" originally aired on September 30, 1966. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Operation Briefcase
    Hogan agrees to aid German General Stauffen (Oscar Beregi) in a plot to assassinate Adolf Hitler. Crucial to the scheme is a briefcase containing a tiny but deadly time bomb. Unfortunately, stupid Sgt. Schultz accidentally activates the bomb's timing device ahead of schedule. Though the audience is aware that Der Fuhrer wouldn't bite the big one until 1945, Laurence Marks' teleplay manages to deliver a sufficient amount of suspense, along with the usual quota of laughs. "Operation Briefcase" first aired on October 7, 1966. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: A Tiger Hunt in Paris, Part Two
    In the conclusion of a two-part story, Hogan and his men have successfully managed to sneak into Paris, courtesy of the unwitting Col. Klink. Racing against time -- not to mention his Russian competitor, secret agent Marya (Nita Talbot) -- Hogan must free underground agent Tiger (Arlene Martel) from the Gestapo and also locate several secret Nazi fighter bases. Crucial to the success of Hogan's schemes is a fortune-teller named Antonovich (Henry Corden), who happens to be a dead ringer for Nazi police chief Heinrich Himmler (also Henry Corden). Written by Richard M. Powell, part two of "A Tiger Hunt in Paris" first aired on November 25, 1966. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Will the Real Adolf Please Stand Up?
    The men of Stalag 13 have long been amused by Sgt. Carter's dead-on impersonation of Adolf Hitler. But it is hardly a laughing matter when Carter is ordered to pose as Der Fuhrer for real, as part of a scheme to smuggle photos of secret German fortifications to the Allies. Future MASH costar William Christopher appears as Major Krantz. Written by Laurence Marks, "Will the Real Adolf Please Stand Up" originally aired on December 2, 1966. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Don't Forget to Write
    Failing a physical examination, Klink is ordered to combat duty on the dreaded Russian front. This naturally causes consternation amongst Hogan and his men, who don't want Klink to be replaced by a more efficient Kommandant. To save their favorite patsy -- and themselves -- Hogan's heroes cook up a scheme to convince the German high command that Klink is indispensable. Written by Laurence Marks, "Don't Forget to Write" first aired on December 9, 1966. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Klink's Rocket
    Hogan's latest scheme is to redirect a fleet of Luftwaffe bombers bound for London so that the planes will be shot down by the Allies. The plan hinges on some phony information that is to be leaked to Col. Klink. Unfortunately, Sgt. Carter forgets the false info, forcing Hogan to improvise a new scheme. Harold Gould appears as General Von Lintzer. Written by Art Baer and Ben Joelson, "Klink's Rocket" originally aired on December 16, 1966. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    The Lucy Show: Lucy and Bob Crane
    Actor Bob Crane of Hogan's Heroes fame asks Lucy (Lucille Ball) out to dinner, charmed by her demure femininity. What Bob doesn't know is that Lucy moonlights at his studio as a mustachioed male stuntman "Iron Man Carmichael." But Mr. Crane will soon be clued in on Lucy's double life when she is hired for a parachute stunt in his latest picture -- in which the sneering villain is played by Lucy's boss, Mr. Mooney (Gale Gordon)! This episode, which also features another of Crane's familiar Hogan's Heroes cohorts (hint: He knows nothing! Noth-ing!), represents the final appearance of the legendary Iron Man Carmichael. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: The Great Impersonation
    LeBeau, Newkirk, and Carter are captured by the Gestapo and held for interrogation. To free his comrades, Hogan hatches a scheme whereby he must convince Sgt. Schultz to pose as Colonel Klink. The supporting cast includes Bert Freed as Major Bernsdorf and prolific TV writer/director James Frawley as the Gestapo captain. Written by Laurence Marks, "The Great Impersonation" made its network TV bow on February 4, 1966. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: It Takes a Thief...Sometimes
    Hogan is ordered to contact a new underground sabotage group that has entrenched itself near Stalag 13. Little does he suspect that the head of the group, Captain Heinrich (Michael Constantine), is actually a spy for the Gestapo. Singer Claudine Longet, then better known as the wife of Andy Williams, appears as Michelle. First telecast on January 28, 1966, "It Takes a Thief. . .Sometimes" was written by Richard M. Powell. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Hello, Zolle
    Planning a full assault on the forces of German General Stofle (Gilbert Green), the Allies order Hogan to detain Stofle for 24 hours. At first, the assignment seems to be a cinch, inasmuch as Stofle and Col. Klink are old buddies. The fly in the ointment is suspicious Gestapo officer Major Zolle (Gavin MacLeod), who has arrived in camp to investigate Klink's perfect no-escape record. Written by David Chantler and Jack H. Robinson, "Hello, Zolle" first aired on January 21, 1966. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: The Flame Grows Higher
    Somehow or other, the Germans have found the location of Stalag 13's escape tunnel. To locate the weak link in their underground security system, Hogan, LeBeau, and Newkirk must break out of camp -- and then back into camp -- without arousing Klink's suspicions. Susanne Cramer appears as Eva. Scripted by David Chandler, Jack H. Robinson, and Laurence Marks from a story by Chandler and Robinson, "The Flame Grows Higher" first aired on April 22, 1966. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Hogan Gives a Birthday Party
    Hogan's Heroes began its second season on September 16, 1966, with the episode titled "Hogan Gives a Birthday Party." Assigned to bomb a heavily guarded German oil refinery, Hogan hopes to trick his captors into letting him fly a German plane in a test mission. Unfortunately, his plans are discovered by an old nemesis, General Biedenbender (James Gregory), who has an uncanny knack for anticipating Hogan's every move -- and every thought. The climactic airborne sequence finds Sgt. Schultz "seeing nothing-NOTHING!" to ridiculous lengths. "Hogan Gives a Birthday Party" was written by Richard M. Powell. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Request Permission to Escape
    Receiving a "Dear John" letter from his hometown girlfriend Mary Jane, Sgt. Carter asks Col. Hogan's permission to escape from Stalag 17. Hogan allows him to do so -- on the proviso that Carter help out on one final sabotage mission. As it turns out, however, Carter is happier as a POW than as a scorned sweetheart. Written by Laurence Marks, "Request Permission to Escape" originally aired on April 29, 1966, as the final episode of Hogan's Heroes' first season. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: The Safecracker Suite
    Klink's old friend Major Kronman (Antony Eustrel) is captured by the Gestapo and charged with conspiring against Adolf Hitler. In true "guilt by association" fashion, Klink is likewise targeted for arrest and execution. Thus it is that Klink agrees to allow Hogan to steal the evidence against Kronman from the camp's safe -- a job requiring the special skills of Newkirk's old friend, professional cracksman Alfred "Alfie the Artist" Burke (Walter Burke). Written by Laurence Marks, "The Safecracker Suite" originally aired on March 25, 1966. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: I Look Better in Basic Black
    Hogan wants to find out why three female American USO entertainers are being held by the Gestapo. He learns that the girls accidentally stumbled upon a secret Nazi V-2 rocket site, thus need desperately to be smuggled into England. Complicating matters are a collapsed escape tunnel and the amorous inclinations of Col. Klink and Sgt. Schultz. The solution: An elaborate masquerade, with Hogan's heroes posing as Hogan's heroines. Jean Hale, Jayne Massey, and Jackie Joseph appear respectively as Kathy, Ginger, and Charlene. Written by Arthur Julian, "I Look Better in Basic Black" was first telecast on April 1, 1966. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: The Assassin
    When Hogan is ordered to assassinate German atomic scientist Dr. Vanetti (Larry D. Mann), the obstreperous Colonel Crittendon demands that he pull off the unpleasant task. Bowing to pressure, Hogan agrees to smuggle Crittendon out of a neighboring POW camp so that he can complete the mission. But Vanetti throws a spanner in the works when he announces that he wants to defect to the Allies. Written by Richard M. Powell, "The Assassin" first aired on April 8, 1966. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Cupid Comes to Stalag 13
    Klink's inability to win a promotion has kept him awake until the wee small hours of the morning, confounding Hogan's plans to smuggle a prisoner out of Stalag 13. To get Klink's mind off his problems, Hogan offers to act as matchmaker between Klink and General Burkhalter's attractive niece. Unfortunately, Burkhalter is more eager to marry off his less than attractive sister Gertrude (Kathleen Freeman, in the first of several series appearances). Written by Phil Sharp, "Cupid Comes to Stalag 13" originally aired on April 15, 1966. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: The Battle of Stalag 13
    Before joining the regular Hogan's Heroes cast as Major Hochstetter, Howard Caine appeared in a handful of similarly villainous roles. In this episode, Caine is cast as Col. Feldkamp, who wants to convert Stalag 13 into Gestapo headquarters. Meanwhile, pompous General Von Kattenhorn (Jacques Aubuchon) intends to turn the camp into a rest home for German officers. Hogan cooks up a scheme to play the two officers against each other, the better to discredit -- and eliminate -- both men. Janine Gray appears as underground activist Greta. First telecast on October 14, 1966, "The Battle of Stalag 13" was written by Richard M. Powell, who indulges in his usual predilection for killing off supporting characters in a humorous fashion. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: The Rise and Fall of General Schultz
    Whit Bissell guest stars as Kammler, Sgt. Schultz's army friend from WWI. Now a general, Kammler demands that Klink give Schultz preferential treatment. Exploiting this situation, Hogan sets up a phony award ceremony for Schultz so that he can sneak a captured underground agent out of Gestapo headquarters. Written by Laurence Marks, "The Rise and Fall of General Schultz" (aka "The Rise and Fall of Sergeant Schultz") first aired on October 21, 1966. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Hogan Springs
    Hogan's plans to smuggle four underground leaders into England hits a snag when the emergency tunnel under Stalag 13 is flooded due to a broken water main. In order to divert Klink while repairs are made, Hogan convinces the cloddish Kommandant that the waters under the camp are therapeutic -- thus it is necessary to create a health spa for German officers. The guest cast includes Sid Clute as Sparrow and Walter Janowitz as Schnitzer. Written by Laurence Marks, "Hogan Springs" originally aired on October 28, 1966. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: A Klink, a Bomb and a Short Fuse
    This episode begins with a major setback when Sgt. Carter bungles a mission to photograph Klink's code book (he forgot to put any film in the camera). When it becomes necessary to create a diversion to complete the mission, Hogan arranges a scenario whereby it appears that a live bomb has landed in camp. Ordered by General Burkhalter to defuse the bomb, Hogan is secure in the knowledge that the weapon is a fake created by Carter in his lab. Or is it? Written by Phil Sharp, "A Klink, a Bomb and a Short Fuse" first aired on November 4, 1966. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Tanks for the Memory
    This week's mission begins when a test model for the Germans' new radio-controlled tank is brought into Stalag 13. Hogan is ordered to make a blueprint of the tank, then destroy the vehicle before it can be taken for a trial run. A simple task, yes? No -- not with the roadblocks thrown in the path of Hogan and his heroes by scriptwriter Laurence Marks. "Tanks for the Memory" made its initial CBS network appearance on November 11, 1966. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: The 43rd, a Moving Story
    Sandy Kenyon is cast as Major Hans Kuehn, who has been assigned as Klink's new adjutant. The ruthlessly ambitious Kuehn may well mess up Hogan's plans to destroy a German mobile anti-aircraft battery. Hogan's dilemma this week is to simultaneously pull off the mission and discredit Kuehn. The script was co-written by Tom Adair and James Allardice, the man responsible for most of Alfred Hitchcock's droll opening comments on Hitch's weekly TV anthology. "The 43rd, a Moving Story" originally aired on February 25, 1966. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: The General Swap
    Hogan and his men capture German Field Marshal Von Heinke (John Myhers), then arrange a prisoner swap to free American General Aloysius Barton (Frank Gerstle). Unfortunately, the mean-spirited Barton despises Hogan and very nearly sabotages his own bid for freedom. Now Hogan finds himself in the unenviable position of currying favor with both the Nazis and his own side. Written by R.S. Allen and Harvey Bullock, "The General Swap" first aired on January 6, 1967. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: An Evening of Generals
    Hogan and his men draw up a plan to blow up a roomful of German generals during a secret banquet meeting. Posing as caterers, our heroes manage to plant several booby-trapped ashtrays in the banquet hall. The problem: London insists that the sabotage scheme be called off, because one of the officers is an Allied plant. Though quite funny, this episode is somewhat sobering in that Hogan has no qualms about killing Klink and Schultz along with the rest of the German brass. Also appearing are Maurice Marsac as Sgt. Jacques Mornay, John Hoyt as General Bruner, and Ben Wright as General Mercer. Also known as "Evening of the Generals," the episode was written by Laurence Marks and first telecast on December 2, 1967. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Everybody Loves a Snowman
    Hogan faces the daunting task of arranging the mass escape of an entire American bomber crew. To this end, Hogan's men construct a huge snowman to camouflage the escape route -- and hope against hope that the weather doesn't change! Noam Pitlik, who played the double agent in the Hogan's Heroes pilot episode, is here cast as U.S.A.F. Captain Morgan. Written by Arthur Julian, "Everybody Loves a Snowman" first aired on December 9, 1967. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: The Hostage
    Nita Talbot returns as Russian spy Marya, Hogan's friendly underground rival. This time around, Marya is assigned to blow up a German fuel depot next to Stalag 13. She is determined to set her time bombs and complete her mission, even though Hogan is being held hostage in the depot by General Von Heiner (Theo Marcuse). Written by series stalwart Richard M. Powell, "The Hostage" originally aired on December 16, 1967. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Carter Turns Traitor
    It seems incredible, but the evidence is overwhelming: Sgt. Carter has turned against Hogan and gone over to the German side. But fear not, Hogan's Heroes fans: Carter's defection is but a ruse, which will (hopefully) enable him to ferret out the location of a top-secret German chemical factory. Antoinette Bower makes the first of two third-season appearances, here cast as Leni Richter. Written by Richard M. Powell, "Carter Turns Traitor" first aired on December 23, 1967. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Two Nazis for the Price of One
    The Allies' Manhattan Project (which of course was aimed at developing an atomic weapon before the Germans could do the same) is endangered when a Gestapo agent finds out about the project. He also finds out about Hogan's underground activities, forcing Hogan to consider scuttling his operation. But before he does so, Hogan attempts to trick the Gestapo man into revealing how much he knows about the atom bomb plans. The role of Gestapo operative Herman Freitag is played by Alan Oppenheimer -- an ironic bit of casting, in light of the fact that one of the prime movers of the Manhattan Project was J. Robert Oppenheimer. Written by Phil Sharp, "Two Nazis for the Price of One" originally aired on December 30, 1967. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Killer Klink
    Hogan plans to use Schultz as an unwitting go-between in a plan to smuggle radio components to the Underground. The plan's success relies upon the possibility of Schultz being granted a week's furlough in Heidelberg. But several problems arise: Not only does Klink refuse to give Schultz a furlough, but the chubby sergeant has also had a falling-out with his wife Gretchen. The immense Barbara Morrison (best known for her comic-foil work on The Red Skelton Show) appears as the seldom-seen Mrs. Schultz, while frequent series guest star Parley Baer is cast as Dr. Pohlman. Written by Harvey Bullock and R.S. Allen, "Killer Klink" first aired on February 24, 1967. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Reverend Kommandant Klink
    Hogan is faced with the possibility that captured French pilot Lt. Boucher (Felice Orlandi) may crack under Gestapo questioning and expose the POW's espionage operation. To keep Boucher's morale high, Hogan smuggles in the Frenchman's sweetheart Suzanne (Susan Albert). He then goes one step further, attempting to trick Klink into performing a marriage ceremony between Boucher and his beloved. The episode's highlight is another disguise scene, with Sgt. Carter appearing in outrageous drag. Scripted by Richard M. Powell, Art Baer, and Ben Joelson from a story by Baer and Joelson, "Reverend Kommandant Klink" originally aired on March 3, 1967. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: The Most Escape-Proof Camp I've Ever Escaped From
    British POW and self-proclaimed escape artist Sgt. Malcolm Flood (Mickey Manners) has already broken out of nine prison camps when he is transferred to Stalag 13. Against Hogan's orders, Flood intends to make a tenth bid for freedom. To protect his scheduled rendezvous with the OSS, Hogan must prevent Flood's escape -- or, failing that, he must recapture the elusive Britisher himself. Written by future All in the Family stalwart Bill Davenport, "The Most Escape-Proof Camp I've Ever Escaped From" first aired on March 10, 1967. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: The Tower
    With the aid of German underground agent Lili (Elisa Ingram), Hogan blows up a German radio tower. Though he has no proof, General Burkhalter suspects that Hogan was responsible for the sabotage and holds Klink responsible. To prevent Klink from being transferred, Hogan must arrange to trap Burkhalter in a compromising situation. Written by Laurence Marks, "The Tower" made its first network appearance on March 17, 1967. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Colonel Klink's Secret Weapon
    When he gets a poor discipline rating, Klink brings in tough sergeant Reinhold Franks (Milton Selzer). At first, Klink is pleased that Franks has gotten the POWS in line -- but his pleasure turns to pain when the ambitious sergeant schemes to have Klink transferred to the Russian front. It is up to Hogan to simultaneously discredit Franks and cast the incompetent Klink in a good light. Written by Phil Sharp), "Colonel Klink's Secret Weapon" was first broadcast on March 24, 1967. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: The Great Brinksmeyer Robbery
    In order to purchase some vital information on Nazi rocket installations, Hogan requisitions 100,000 Deutchesmarks from his Allied contacts. Alas, the money is burned in the Stalag 13 stove when the Germans make a surprise inspection. To replace the cash, Hogan and his men must stage a bank robbery in a nearby village. Comic actress Joyce Jameson has a great drunk scene as Mady Pfeiffer, while frequent Hogan's Heroes guest star Theo Marcuse is here cast as Strasser. Written by Phil Sharp, "The Great Brinksmeyer Robbery" originally aired on January 13, 1967. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Praise the Führer and Pass the Ammunition
    In honor of Klink's birthday, Hogan plans a sabotage operation against some German war games being held near Stalag 13. The plan is contingent upon surreptitiously replacing the fake ammunition used in the games with real bullets. Larry Hovis (Sgt. Carter) is conspicuous by his absence in this episode, which does, however, feature periodic Hogan's Heroes guest star (and Jackie Gleason Show semi-regular) Frank Marth as Colonel Deutch. Written by Jack Elinson, "Praise the Führer and Pass the Ammunition" first aired on January 20, 1967. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Hogan and the Lady Doctor
    Hogan bristles at the notion of taking orders from female underground agent Dr. Suzanne Lechay (Ruta Lee). Even more vexing is the fact that Dr. Lechay is bound and determined to complete Hogan's assignment to destroy a Nazi synthetic-fuel lab -- a mission Hogan had previously rejected for being too risky. This episode was written by Laurence Marks, who penned most of the series' second-season installments. "Hogan and the Lady Doctor" originally aired on January 27, 1967. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: The Swing Shift
    In order to destroy a German ammunition factory, Hogan and his men go undercover as workers in the target factory. Their plans to blow up the place hit a snag when, through a fluke, Newkirk is drafted into the German army. Hal Smith, best known for his portrayal of town drunk Otis Campbell on The Andy Griffth Show, is here seen as Hans Spear. Written by Art Baer and Ben Joelson, "The Swing Shift" made its first network appearance on February 3, 1967. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Heil Klink
    Hogan and his men are determined to provide safe passage for defecting German officer Wolfgang Brauner, who except for his beard, is a dead ringer for Sgt. Schultz (indeed, series regular John Banner plays both Brauner and Schultz). Unfortunately, Hogan's plans are nearly scuttled by an overly inquisitive Klink. To throw the Kommandant off the track, Hogan convinces Klink that the corpulent Brauner is really Adolf Hitler in disguise! Arlene Martel makes another appearance as sexy underground operative Tiger. Written by Richard M. Powell, "Heil Klink" was originally telecast on February 10, 1967. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Everyone Has a Brother-in-Law
    Comic actor Cliff Norton plays it straight as Captain Kurtz, Klink's new, no-nonsense adjutant. Kurtz' arrival complicates Hogan's efforts to destroy a German munitions train. Adding to the dilemma is the fact that Kurtz gets wind of Hogan's espionage operation and poses as a potential defector. "Everyone Has a Brother-in-Law" is one of several second-season episodes written by Laurence Marks; it was first broadcast on February 17, 1967. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Casanova Klink
    Once again, General Burkhalter tries to marry off his Wagnerian sister Gertrude (Kathleen Freeman) to Colonel Klink. The General installs Gertrude as Klink's temporary secretary, which causes problems with Hogan's latest sabotage operation. But Hogan has something else to worry about -- a Gestapo spy has infiltrated his ranks. Frequent series guest star Woodrow Parfrey appears as Hugo Hindman. Written by Bill Davenport, "Casanova Klink" was first telecast on October 14, 1967. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: How to Win Friends and Influence Nazis
    Karl Swenson is appropriately cast as Dr. Karl Svenson, a neutral Swedish scientist working for the Germans. To win Svenson over to the Allied cause, Hogan arranges a romance between the good doctor and an attractive chanteuse named Magda Tischler (Doris Singleton). But he'd better hurry: Svenson has been targeted for assassination by the Gestapo. Written by Phil Sharp, "How to Win Friends and Influence Nazis" first aired on October 21, 1967. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Nights in Shining Armor
    This week, Hogan's double mission is to smuggle French courier Dubois (Felice Orlandi) and a German consignment of bulletproof vests out of Stalag 13 and into the hands of the Underground. Though Dubois poses no real problem, the vests are much too heavy to be carried out by any one man. The solution: Hogan and his men volunteer to test out the vests -- even if it means facing enemy bullets to do so. Written by Laurence Marks, "Nights in Shining Armor" originally aired on October 28, 1967. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Hot Money
    A German counterfeit-money plant, designed to devalue Allied currency, has been set up in Stalag 13. Hogan's mission: To destroy the plant before any real damage can be done. Hogan's strategy: To trick a master forger into doing the sabotage job for him. The supporting cast includes Sandy Kenyon as Major Bock and Jon Cedar as Stoffel. First telecast on November 4, 1967, "Hot Money" was written by Laurence Marks. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: One in Every Crowd
    Paul Picerni guest stars as Jack Williams, an opportunistic -- and treacherous -- American POW. In exchange for his own freedom, Williams intends to give the Gestapo information on Hogan's underground activities. Hogan hatches a scheme to turn the tables on the turncoat. The episode's highlight is a brawl sequence -- a masterpiece of comic choreography. Written by Laurence Marks, "One in Every Crowd" originally aired on November 11, 1967. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Is General Hammerschlag Burning?
    This episode is dominated by the superb performances of two African-American performers: Series regular Ivan Dixon as Kinchloe, and singer Barbara McNair as American-born chanteuse Kumasa. Sneaking into Paris, Hogan and Kinchloe hope to convince Kumasa, who has become disillusioned with America's treatment of her people, to extract vital information from her German protector, General Von Hammerschlag (Paul Lambert). The plan hinges upon Kinchloe's prior friendship with Kumasa when they both attended the same high school. Written by Richard M. Powell, "Is General Hammerschlag Burning?" first aired on November 18, 1967. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: A Russian Is Coming
    Hogan is assigned to provide safe conduct to downed Soviet pilot Igor Piotkin (Bob Hastings). Unfortunately, the fiercely patriotic and stubborn Piotkin refuses to flee to freedom by way of London. He insists upon heading directly to Russia -- and never mind that the homeward path is festooned with German troops. Written by Phil Sharp, "A Russian Is Coming" made its first network appearance on November 25, 1967. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: The Reluctant Target
    Hogan hopes to spring French spy Pierre (Theo Marcuse) from Stalag 13. To do this, he must get Klink temporarily out of the way. The next step in the plan -- convincing Col. Klink to allow Hogan to pose as the POW camp's German commandant! Larry D. Mann rounds out the guest cast as General Brenner. Written by Phil Sharp, "The Reluctant Target" originally aired on April 7, 1967, as the final episode of Hogan's Heroes' second season. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: The Crittendon Plan
    Hogan's Heroes inaugurated its third season -- and moved from its Friday timeslot to a new Saturday-evening berth in the process -- with the episode titled "The Crittendon Plan." Much against his better judgment, Hogan is ordered to spring his longtime rival Colonel Crittendon (Bernard Fox) from a neighboring POW camp, all because the bumbling Crittendon has unexpectedly drawn up a perfect scheme for destroying a Nazi convoy. Things get even dicier when it turns out that Hogan has the wrong Crittendon! Written by Richard M. Powell), "The Crittendon Plan" first aired on September 9, 1967. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Some of Their Planes Are Missing
    The Luftwaffe hatches a scheme to bomb London with captured RAF airplanes and phony British pilots. When the planes are brought into Stalag 13 for safekeeping, Hogan hatches a scheme to destroy them before they can take flight. Stewart Moss appears as POW Olsen, assuming the responsibilities normally handled by Newkirk (Richard Dawson is absent from this episode). Written by Laurence Marks, "Some of Their Planes Are Missing" originally aired on September 16, 1967. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: D-Day at Stalag 13
    As part of the Allies' plans to invade Normandy Beach on June 6, 1944, Hogan is ordered to place the German generals encamped at Stalag 13 out of commission. To accomplish this, Hogan miraculously pulls enough strings to get Col. Klink promoted to German chief of staff -- or at least, to convince the generals that this promotion has taken place. The supporting cast includes several frequent Hogan's Heroes guest performers: Harold Gould as Von Scheiber, J. Pat O'Malley as the British general, and John Hoyt as Bruner. Written by Richard M. Powell, "D-Day at Stalag 13" first aired on September 23, 1967. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Sergeant Schultz Meets Mata Hari
    Comic actress Joyce Jameson, previously seen as dizzy fraulein Mady Pfeiffer in the second-season episode "The Great Brinkmeyer's Robbery," is here cast as sultry Gestapo spy Eva Mueller. Assigned to learn the source for a recent rash of sabotages, Eva pumps dim-witted Sgt. Schultz for information. Though Schultz, as usual, knows "NOTH-INK! NOTH-INK!", Hogan wisely perceives Eva as a threat to his operation and cooks up a scheme to discredit her in the eyes of her superiors. Howard Caine makes his first appearance as Major Hochstetter. Written by Laurence Marks, "Sergeant Schultz Meets Mata Hari" originally aired on September 30, 1967. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Funny Thing Happened on the Way to London
    Hogan and his men uncover a Nazi scheme to assassinate British Prime Minister Winston Churchill. The Germans have captured RAF pilot and Churchill confidante Captain Roberts (Lloyd Bochner), who they replace with an exact lookalike, Lt. Baumann (also Lloyd Bochner). Racing against time, Hogan endeavors to replace the phony Baumann with the genuine article -- without tipping off the Gestapo, or Baumann, that he is wise to the scheme. Written by Laurence Marks, "Funny Thing Happened on the Way to London" was originally broadcast on October 7, 1967. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Bad Day in Berlin
    An undercover U.S. intelligence agent arranges for Hogan and his crew to be smuggled into Berlin. Disguised as members of a hospital staff, the heroes are ordered to kidnap a British defector before he reveals top-secret information to the Nazis. The supporting cast includes such frequent Hogan's Heroes drop-ins as Harold J. Stone (as Major Teppel), John Stephenson (Decker), and Edward Knight (Gestapo Major Metzger). Written by Laurence Marks, "Bad Day in Berlin" first aired on December 7, 1968. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Is There a Doctor in the House?
    Once again, Hogan needs Klink as a dupe for a vital mission; this time, the task is to smuggle a French girl named Janine Robinet (Brenda Benet) to London. Unfortunately, Klink falls ill and is knocked out of commission. Hogan and his men set about to get Klink back on his feet, using such home remedies as LeBeau's tasty -- but unpleasantly aromatic -- Bernaise sauce. Written by Arthur Julian, "Is There a Doctor in the House?" first aired on January 6, 1968. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Guess Who Came to Dinner?
    Hogan helps beautiful underground contact Heidi Eberhadt (Marj Dusay) escape to London. But after successfully completing this mission, Hogan receives word that Heidi might be a double agent. Character actor Ned Glass is seen as the owner of the delicatessen used by Hogan as a drop point, while frequent Hogan's Heroes supporting player Milton Selzer is cast as Otto von Krubner. First telecast on November 23, 1968, "Guess Who Came to Dinner" was written by Arthur Julian. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Color the Luftwaffe Red
    Assigned to plant a bug in Luftwaffe headquarters, Hogan and his crew volunteer to paint the building, thereby completing their mission right under the enemy's nose. In the course of the paint job, Newkirk comes upon a map of German plan installations. Forced to stow the map in an overhead lamp, Hogan and his men must cook up a new excuse to get back into the building. Written by Laurence Marks, "Color the Luftwaffe Red" originally aired on November 16, 1968. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Drums Along the Dusseldorf
    Hogan successfully completes his mission of mining an enemy bridge. He then discovers to his chagrin that a truckload of Allied prisoners will soon be crossing the same bridge. The solution to the crisis hinges on Carter's Sioux heritage and Newkirk's Robin Hood-like ancestor. (Trivia note: Larry Hovis, who played Carter, was actually raised on the Yakima Indian Reservation in Washington State.) Written by Arthur Julian, "Drums Along the Dusseldorf" originally aired on March 30, 1968, as the final episode of Hogan's Heroes' third season. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Monkey Business
    Hogan's newest "hero" is Freddy, a chimpanzee who wanders into camp after the nearby Hammelburg Zoo is bombed. Previously unable to smuggle radio components to the Underground, Hogan decides to use Freddy as his courier. The trick is to avoid arousing the suspicions of those two-legged primates Klink and Schultz. Written by Arthur Julian, "Monkey Business" made its original network appearance on March 23, 1968. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: The Ultimate Weapon
    In the first-season episode "Psychic Kommandant," Hogan made it appear as if Klink was gifted with ESP. In this episode, it is Schultz who is persuaded that he has "second sight" and is thus able to predict Allied attacks. It's all part of Hogan's plan to trick Luftwaffe planes into going to the wrong bombing location so that the Allies can blast the enemy out of the skies. Written by Richard M. Powell, "The Ultimate Weapon" originally aired on March 16, 1968. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: The Collector General
    Hogan wants to find out the contents of a truck brought into Stalag 13. Under cover of darkness, Hogan and his men learn that the truck is overloaded with confiscated French art masterpieces bound for the collection of General Metzger (Gavin McLeod, in one of his many Hogan's Heroes guest stints). The next step: recover the art and discredit the general. Written by Laurence Marks, "The Collector General" first aired on March 9, 1968. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Klink vs. the Gonculator
    One of Hogan's Heroes' best episodes, "Klink vs. the Gonculator" goes beyond the series' standard spoof of wartime bureaucracy and offers a wide-ranging satire of corporate paranoia and behind-covering. When Klink becomes convinced that Carter's rabbit trap is a secret electronic device, Hogan seizes upon this misconception in order to help German defector Major Lutz (Noam Pitlik) escape to London. Persuading Klink that Carter's device is something called a "gonculator," Hogan further convinces Klink -- and the German top brass -- to bring Lutz into Stalag 13 as an "electronics expert." One of the funniest scenes finds both Klink and Burkhalter assuring each other that Carter's creation is "not as good as our gonculator." Written by Phil Sharp, "Klink vs. the Gonculator" first aired on October 5, 1968. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: How to Escape From Prison Camp Without Really Trying
    Hogan must create a diversionary tactic to allow the Allies to replenish their troops. He must also prevent the 6th S.S. division from taking over Stalag 13. As a means of accomplishing both tasks, Hogan arranges the mass escape of 30 Allied prisoners -- and deliberately tips off both the S.S. and Colonel Klink. Written by Bill Davenport, "How to Escape From Prison Camp Without Really Trying" originally aired on March 2, 1968. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: LeBeau and the Little Old Lady
    Assigned to an underground courier mission, LeBeau returns to camp with stories of his cranky, "old lady" contact. It turns out that the contact is really a beautiful young Dutch woman named Willhelmina (Celeste Yarnell), but LeBeau doesn't want the other POWs to find out lest they insist upon taking his assignment away from him. Falling in love with Willhelmina, LeBeau risks his life to save her from the Gestapo. Written by Arthur Julian, "LeBeau and the Little Old Lady" first aired on February 24, 1968. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: What Time Does the Balloon Go Up?
    Hogan concocts a fanciful scheme to smuggle British agent Downes to London via air balloon. This requires such diversions as a basket-weaving tournament and a kite-flying contest. The next step is to convince Klink to act as judge for the POW's competitive activities, the better to keep the cloddish commandant in the dark as to Hogan's real mission. Written by Arthur Julian, "What Time Does the Balloon Go Up?" was first telecast on February 17, 1968. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Axis Annie
    Louise Troy appears as "Axis Annie" Gebhart, a German radio propagandist. Hoping to relay coded messages to the Allies, Hogan and his men agree to an on-air interview conducted by Annie. Unfortunately, their words come across as fervently pro-Nazi, thus Hogan must cook up a scheme to destroy the transcriptions. Written by Laurence Marks, "Axis Annie" originally aired on February 10, 1968. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Duel of Honor
    In order to transfer vital information to the Allies in London, Hogan must convince Klink to take a circuitous trip to "Argentina." This requires the service of underground agent Erika Weidler, who seductively plays up to Klink. At a crucial juncture, Erika's outraged husband (actually Sgt. Carter in disguise) charges in and challenges Klink to a duel -- so naturally, the Commandant is more than willing to allow Hogan to help him escape to the Western hemisphere (or so he thinks). In her second Hogan's Heroes appearance during the series' third season, Antoinette Bower is cast as Erika. Written by Richard M. Powell, "Duel of Honor" first aired on February 3, 1968. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: War Takes a Holiday
    Hogan's task is to free four Allied captives of the Gestapo. As a means to this end, Hogan and his crew must convince both Klink and Hochstetter that the war is over! Future MASH regular William Christopher is here seen as POW Thomas, a temporary replacement for Sgt. Carter (reportedly Larry Hovis was engaged elsewhere, either with the pilot for Rowan and Martin's Laugh-In or a Dinah Shore special). First shown on January 27, 1968, "War Takes a Holiday" was written by Art Baer and Ben Joelson. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Sticky Wicket Newkirk
    Newkirk smuggles his new girlfriend Gretel into Stalag 13. Unfortunately for all concerned, the girl turns out to be a German spy -- and now she knows all about Hogan's espionage activities. Hogan is faced with the double assignment of discrediting Gretel and expediting a mass escape, twin tasks complicated even further when Newkirk is transferred to another barracks. Ulla Stromstedt, who as the treacherous Myra was "killed" in the second-season episode "Diamonds in the Rough," is here cast as the duplicitous Gretel. Written by Richard M. Powell, "Sticky Wicket Newkirk" was originally broadcast on January 20, 1968. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Hogan, Go Home
    On the eve of an important sabotage mission, Hogan is ordered to return to America and a hero's welcome. His replacement is the redoubtable Col. Crittendon (Bernard Fox), whose devotion to duty is matched only by his ineptitude. Unfortunately, Crittendon inherits Hogan's mission to blow up the Berlin Express -- and never mind that Hogan himself will be on board as part of his escape plan. Written by Bill Davenport, "Hogan, Go Home" originally aired on January 13, 1968. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Man in a Box
    LeBeau is given the opportunity to complete an important mission all by himself. When Klink realizes that LeBeau is absent, he orders Hogan to recapture the pint-sized POW. Then Schultz is ordered to follow Hogan -- and when he fails to return on time, Klink follows Schultz, and round and round we go, and where we stop, only scriptwriter Laurence Marks knows. "Man in a Box" originally aired on December 28, 1968. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Will the Real Colonel Klink Please Stand Up Against the Wall?
    Carter disguises himself as Klink during a sabotage mission. Holding Klink responsible for the attack, the Gestapo have him arrested and sentenced to execution. Hogan must find a way to simultaneously rescue Klink and Carter, who is off on another mission in the same disguise. "Will the Real Colonel Klink Please Stand Up Against the Wall" was written by future All in the Family stalwart Bill Davenport and was first broadcast on December 21, 1968. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Will the Blue Baron Strike Again?
    The Allies would like to locate the new Luftwaffe headquarters of famed WWI German flying ace General Von Richter (Henry Corden), aka "the Blue Baron." To realize this goal, Hogan persuades Klink to throw a gala party in Von Richter's honor. Cynthia Lynn, who played Klink's secretary Hilda during the series' first season, is here cast as a Mata Hari-like exotic dancer, while frequent Hogan's Heroes supporting player Celeste Yarnall plays a nanny. Written by Arthur Julian, "Will the Blue Baron Strike Again?" originally aired on December 14, 1968. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Never Play Cards with Strangers
    Hogan's latest mission is to destroy a German rocket fuel factory. Unfortunately, he receives word that the sabotage job is going to backfire disastrously. Even worse, Hogan is trapped in a card game with a German general and is unable to set things right. Dan Tobin appears as General Von Trager, while Arlene Martel, normally cast as underground operative Tiger, is here seen as Olga. Written by Laurence Marks, "Never Play Cards With Strangers" first aired on November 9, 1968. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Man's Best Friend Is Not His Dog
    The good news: Carter is able to snap a picture of a new German tank. The bad news: With the Germans hot on his heels, Hogan is forced to hide Carter's microfilm in a hollow bone. The worst news: The bone is buried by a friendly dog. The supporting cast includes such Hogan's Heroes perennials as Chet Stratton and Dick Wilson (the latter taking time out from his duties as "Mr. Whipple" in the Charmin commercials). Written by Phil Sharp, "Man's Best Friend is Not His Dog" originally aired on November 2, 1968. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: To the Gestapo with Love
    Carter inadvertently leaves one of his coat buttons behind at a sabotage site. Using this evidence, General Hochstetter decides to interrogate Hogan and his crew. Usually, this would mean that Hochstetter would get no information whatsoever, but this time the General has a secret weapon: Three gorgeous, and very persuasive, female Gestapo agents. Sabrina Scharf, Christiane Schmidtmer, and Inge Jaklin are cast respectively as Inge Wagner, Heidi Baum, and Anna Mannheim -- all of whom look more like 1960s go-go girls than WWII-vintage damsels. Written by Arthur Julian, "To the Gestapo with Love" first aired on October 26, 1968. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Hogan's Trucking Service...We Deliver the Factory to You
    Bernard Fox returns as bungling British POW officer Colonel Crittendon. This time around, Crittendon stages an escape from Stalag 13 -- thereby neatly lousing up Hogan's meticulously laid scheme to blow up a German ball-bearing plant. The script was written by Bill Davenport, later a member of the All in the Family writing staff. "Hogan's Trucking Service. . .We Deliver the Factory to You" was originally telecast on October 19, 1968. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: How to Catch a Papa Bear
    During a standard Underground mission, Newkirk is led into a German trap by double agent Myra (Fay Spain). The next step in the Germans' plan is to lure Hogan -- code name "Papa Bear" -- into coming out in the open. Frequent Hogan's Heroes guest star Alan Oppenheimer is cast as Wilhelm. Written by series stalwart Laurence Marks, "How to Catch a Papa Bear" made its first network appearance on October 12, 1968. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Clearance Sale at the Black Market
    Season four of Hogan's Heroes got under way on September 28, 1968, with the episode titled "Clearance Sale at the Black Market." While relaxing at a local hofbrau, Sgt. Schultz accidentally catches Gestapo major Kriegel (Gavin McLeod) in an illegal cash transaction. To cover his own behind, Kriegel orders Schultz to the Russian front. Hogan and his men must simultaneously expose Kriegel and rescue Schultz. "Clearance Sale at the Black Market" was written by Laurence Marks. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: No Names Please
    Hogan and his crew enable war correspondent Walter Hobson (Richard Erdman) to escape to England. Unfortunately, Hobson chooses to honor Hogan by publishing an account of his underground exploits in an American newspaper. Though the article mentions no names, Gestapo officer Hochstetter puts zvei und zvei together and plants a spy among Klink's guards in order to get the goods on Hogan. Future Hill Street Blues regular James B. Sikking appears as Berger. Originally broadcast on November 30, 1968, "No Names Please" was written by Laurence Marks. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: The Big Gamble
    An Allied plane containing top-secret equipment is shot down near Stalag 13. Hogan and his crew must retrieve the equipment without arousing the suspicion of Major Feldkamp (Ben Wright), a German engineering expert who is likewise nosing around the crash site. Somehow or other, the solution to Hogan's dilemma involves setting up a mobile gambling casino. Noam Pitlik rounds out the guest cast as Captain John Mitchell. First telecast on November 21, 1969, "The Big Gamble" was written by Laurence Marks. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: The Big Picture
    Certain mercenary members of the Gestapo use a compromising photograph to blackmail Col. Klink. It is up to Hogan to steal the picture -- not out of any regard for Klink's reputation, but because the Kommandant has been dipping into the Stalag 13 till, thereby depleting the funds needed for Hogan's underground activities. Frequent series guest star Sandy Kenyon appears as Captain Bohrmann. Written by Laurence Marks, "The Big Picture" originally aired on November 14, 1969. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Bombsight
    Hogan is ordered to sabotage the test of a new German weapon capable of zeroing in on Allied radio signals, and to steal the weapon's blueprints. At first, the assignment goes off without a hitch. But as time rolls on, things are complicated by unforeseen entanglements and incredible bungling on both sides. R.S. Allen and Harvey Bullock were responsible for the round-robin teleplay. "Bombsight" first aired on November 7, 1969. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: The Kommandant Dies at Dawn
    Hoping to smuggle a vital document out of Stalag 13, Hogan plants the papers on Colonel Klink. Unfortunately, the Gestapo finds the papers, arrests Klink for treason, and sentences him to a firing squad. Now Hogan must retrieve both the papers and Klink -- after all, the Kommandant might be replaced by someone who is competent! Written by Arthur Julian, "The Kommandant Dies at Dawn" originally aired on October 31, 1969. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Unfair Exchange
    Kathleen Freeman returns to the role of General Burkhalter's homely sister Gertrude Linkmeier, after briefly relinquishing the character to Alice Ghostley in the fourth-season episode "Watch the Trains Go By." Hoping to negotiate the release of captured Underground agent Maria Hoffman (Wendy Wilson), Hogan and his men kidnap Gertrude as a hostage. Though Burkhalter is outraged, Klink is secretly delighted; at least now he won't be railroaded into marrying the General's Wagnerian sibling. Written by Laurence Marks, "Unfair Exchange" first aired on October 24, 1969. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: The Gasoline War
    The Germans install a fueling station in Barracks 12, right next to Stalag 13. Hogan must hatch a scheme to blow up the station without blowing up himself or his men. Mariana Hill, best known for her performance as a blind-drunk Corleone bride in the Oscar-winning The Godfather II, is cast as Louisa. Written by Laurence Marks, "The Gasoline War" made its first CBS network appearance on October 17, 1969. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: The Klink Commandos
    Hogan must once again collaborate with his friendly rival, Russian spy Marya. This time around, the two agents have to prevent the Gestapo from locating Stalag 13's secret transmitter. Hogan's scheme is a beaut, requiring himself and his crew to volunteer for a suicide mission at the Russian front -- thereby allowing them to board a troop train carrying the Nazi officer (Frank Marth) who holds the documents revealing the transmitter's location. Written by Richard M. Powell, "The Klink Commandos" first aired on October 11, 1969. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: The Well
    Hogan manages to get hold of a book containing the Luftwaffe's secret code. Alas, Newkirk accidentally drops the book into the Stalag 13 well. Hogan's efforts to retrieve the book are stymied by the fact that the well is filling rapidly with freezing-cold water. Will Klink unwittingly provide Hogan with the solution to the problem -- again? Written by series fixture Laurence Marks, "The Well" originally aired on October 3, 1969. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: The Antique
    Hogan talks Col. Klink into opening an antique cuckoo-clock shop. Convinced that he will make a fortune off the needs of European collectors, Klink is blissfully unaware that Hogan plans to use the shop to transmit information to the Underground. This week's "guest cutie" is Kristina, played by Mari Oliver. Written by series stalwart Arthur Julian, "The Antique" made its first network appearance on December 12, 1969. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: The Empty Parachute
    To foil a new German plan to distribute counterfeit money, Hogan must steal the counterfeit plates -- which rest in a briefcase handcuffed to the wrist of an enemy courier. The only solution is to create a diversion by convincing the Germans that an Allied agent has parachuted into Stalag 13. Frequent Hogan's Heroes supporting player Parley Baer shows up in the role of Julius Schlager. Written by Phil Sharp, "The Empty Parachute" first aired on December 5, 1969. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Klink's Old Flame
    Klink trembles in anticipation of a visit from his old flame Marlene Schneider (Norma Eberhardt. Convinced that he is still "irresistible" to Marlene, Klink worries that he will incur the wrath of the lady's new husband, SS officer Count Von Heffernick (Ben Wright). Conversely, Hogan is delighted by the couple's arrival; he hopes to plant a short-wave radio in the Count's Paris-bound honeymoon car. The ending of this episode is a good illustration of actor Werner Klemperer's insistence that his character, Colonel Klink, should never come out on top -- not even when he deserves it. Written by Arthur Julian, "Klink's Old Flame" originally aired on February 8, 1969. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Watch the Trains Go By
    Hogan is assigned to blow up a German train, but can't get past Stalag 13's beefed-up security. Hoping to keep Klink occupied while he attempts to slip away, Hogan arranges a cozy tête-à-tête between Klink and General Burkhalter's matrimony-minded sister -- but Klink, unwilling to be railroaded into marriage, becomes more vigilant than ever in guarding the camp. Alice Ghostley substitutes for Kathleen Freeman in the role of Gertrude Burkhalter. Written by Laurence Marks, "Watch the Trains Go By" first aired on February 1, 1969. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: My Favorite Prisoner
    Well aware of Col. Hogan's fondness for pretty ladies, Klink dispatches sexy Baroness Von Krim (Marj Dusay to pry information out of Hogan. Quickly tumbling to Klink's strategy, Hogan quickly improvises a counterscheme, introducing the Baroness to a British agent named Captain Sears (John Orchard) who bears phony invasion plans. Future Hill Street Blues co-star James B. Sikking appears as a Gestapo officer. Originally telecast on January 25, 1969, "My Favorite Prisoner" was written by Laurence Marks. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Operation Hannibal
    Hogan infiltrates a party to steal secret information from German General Von Behler (John Hoyt). In this he is aided by an unexpected friend: Von Behler's daughter Hedy (Louise Troy), who happens to be an Allied agent. Realizing that her father's plans will prolong the war, Hedy agrees to photograph the documents on Hogan's behalf -- but getting them out of the Von Behler household is another matter entirely. First shown on January 18, 1969, "Operation Hannibal" was written by Laurence Marks. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Who Stole My Copy of 'Mein Kampf?'
    Hogan is ordered to kill British defector Leslie Smythe-Beddoes during an award ceremony for Colonel Klink. The plan hits a snag when Hogan discovers that Leslie is a woman (Ruta Lee). Unwilling to liquidate her in the usual fashion, Hogan concocts a scheme whereby Leslie's credibility with the Gestapo will be destroyed. Ubiquitous Hogan's Heroes supporting player Alan Oppenheimer is here seen as Colonel Sitzer. Written by Phil Sharp, "Who Stole My Copy of 'Mein Kampf'?" originally aired on January 11, 1969. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: The Missing Klink
    Hogan plots to kidnap General Burkhalter as part of a hostage swap that will free Underground leader Hans Wagner (Chris Robinson). Unfortunately, things go awry, and it is Klink who ends up kidnapped. Worse still, negotiations for the release of Wagner fall through when Gestapo decides that Klink is eminently expendable. Also appearing are Ann Prentiss (sister of Paula Prentiss) as Ilse and Dick Wilson ("Mr. Whipple" of TV commercial fame) as Captain Gruber. Written by Bill Davenport, "The Missing Klink" first aired on January 4, 1969. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Hogan Goes Hollywood
    Hogan's Heroes launched its fifth season -- and also returned to the series' original Friday-evening berth -- with the episode titled "Hogan Goes Hollywood." Frequent series guest star Alan Oppenheimer plays his flashiest role (with the aid of an elaborate toupee) as Byron Buckles, a vainglorious Hollywood actor who has been captured by the Germans. Klink hopes to star Buckles in a Nazi propaganda film, a fact that Hogan uses to his advantage as part of a sabotage and information-passing scheme. Taking over direction of the film, Hogan decides that Klink should play Schultz and vice-versa -- but this will hardly be the only blow to Klink's enormous ego. Scripted by Richard M. Powell from a story by Tony Thomas (son of Danny, brother of Marlo, and later a prolific TV producer/director in his own right), "Hogan Goes Hollywood" first aired on September 26, 1969. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Happy Birthday, Dear Hogan
    As a birthday present to Col. Hogan, his men take it upon themselves to blow up an ammunitions dump. Unfortunately, they target the wrong location, thanks to false information fed to them by the Gestapo. Hogan must set things right without tipping off the Gestapo -- and make it back to camp in time to blow out the candles on his oversized cake. Written by Arthur Julian, "Happy Birthday, Dear Hogan" originally aired on March 22, 1969, as the final episode of Hogan's Heroes' fourth season. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: The Return of Major Bonacelli
    Vito Scotti guest stars as peace-loving Italian officer Major Bonacelli, a role originated by Hans Conried in the first-season episode "The Pizza Parlor." Now working undercover for the Allies -- and for Hogan -- Bonacelli wants to chuck it all and escape to Switzerland. Hogan must persuade the Major to go on one final mission: photograph a top-secret German anti-aircraft base. Written by Arthur Julian, "The Return of Major Bonacelli" first aired on March 15, 1969. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: The Big Dish
    Beautiful British traitor Lady Valerie Stanford (Karen Steele) has designed an anti-aircraft weapon for the Nazis. Hogan is ordered to sabotage the weapon, and to do this he must trick Klink into revealing Lady Valerie's whereabouts. But is the lady really the turncoat that she seems to be? Also appearing are frequent Hogan's Heroes supporting players Paul Lambert (as General Riker) and Laurie Main (as Woodhouse). Written by Ben Gershman, "The Big Dish" made its first network appearance on March 8, 1969. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: The Witness
    This episode of Hogan's Heroes features bravura performances by three of the series' most frequent guest stars: Nita Talbot in her customary role of Russian spy Marya, Gavin McLeod as General Von Rauscher, and Larry D. Mann as captured Russian rocket scientist Zagoskin. Von Rauscher hatches a plan whereby Hogan will witness a test flight of Zagoskin's new and devastatingly destructive rocket weapon; Hogan will then be released and sent to England, where he will demand the Allies' surrender lest the weapon be unleashed on London. Can Hogan count on the mercurial Marya's cooperation to foil the General's scheme? Written by Richard M. Powell, "The Witness" was originally broadcast on March 1, 1969. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: The Purchasing Plan
    Hogan and his crew are ordered to pick up air-dropped messages to the Underground. This task completed, the men must figure out a way to deliver the information simultaneously to four different locations. Coincidentally, Klink is in the middle of an enforced "efficiency and economy" drive -- which, of course, Hogan exploits to his advantage. Written by Laurence Marks, "The Purchasing Plan" originally aired on February 22, 1969. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Up in Klink's Room
    Hogan must infiltrate a German hospital in order to contact one of the patients, a British agent (Forrest Compton) posing as a Nazi officer. To do this, Hogan convinces Klink that he has come down with a rare ailment known as "Polaris Extremis." Frequent Hogan's Heroes supporting player Henry Corden is cast as Dr. Klaus, while hefty comic actress Muriel Landers is seen as a nurse. Written by Harvey Bullock and R.S. Allen, "Up in Klink's Room" first aired on February 15, 1969. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: The Defector
    Harold J. Stone guest stars as defecting German Field Marshal Rudolf Richter. Hogan hopes to help Richter escape to England, but this proves difficult with Gestapo officer Hochstetter breathing down everyone's neck. Arlene Martel, seen in earlier episodes as underground agent Tiger, portrays a character named Gretchen. First broadcast on November 28, 1969, "The Defector" was written by Laurence Marks. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Is There a Traitor in the House?
    In a variation on the third-season episode "Axis Annie," guest star Antoinette Bower is cast as Nazi radio propagandist Berlin Betty. At first, Hogan's men balk at Betty's invitation to appear on her radio program and deliver speeches imploring the Allies to surrender. But Hogan surprisingly accepts the offer -- intending to transmit coded messages to the Underground. Written by Arthur Julian, "Is There a Traitor in the House?" first aired on December 19, 1969. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: At Last--Schultz Knows Something
    Amazingly, Sgt. Schultz actually knows the location of an atomic bomb plant. Unable to wheedle the information out of Schultz using the standard methods (including bribing the corpulent sergeant with LeBeau's gourmet food), Hogan relies on a vial of truth serum, courtesy of the Underground. Dave Morick, Hogan's Heroes' all-purpose supporting player during the series' final two seasons, is again cast as an officer. Written by Laurence Marks, "At Last -- Schultz Knows Something" first aired on December 26, 1969. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: The Merry Widow
    Hogan arranges a date between Klink and the beautiful Countess Marlene (Marj Dusay), who is actually an Allied agent. Unfortunately, Klink ends up delivering the wrong plans to the Countess, thereby potentially lousing up Hogan's latest espionage mission. To correct Klink's unwitting error, Hogan orchestrates a second romantic rendezvous between Marlene and Sgt. Schultz. Written by Harvey Bullock and R.S. Allen, "The Merry Widow" was first telecast on March 13, 1970. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Crittendon's Commandos
    Hogan is once again saddled with Colonel Crittendon (Bernard Fox), the Allies' biggest bungler. This time, Crittendon enlists Hogan's aid in a scheme to kidnap Field Marshal Rommel from a nearby German hospital. Crittendon's espionage skills and keen powers of observation result in Hogan and his crew being captured themselves. Written by Bill Davenport, "Crittendon's Commandos" first aired on March 20, 1970. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Klink's Escape
    In order to successfully pull off a sabotage operation, Hogan concocts an elaborate diversion. Thanks to carefully planted "slips," Klink is led to believe that he will be able to trail Hogan's crew to the Underground spy headquarters. In order to make himself the hero of the proceedings, Klink goes out of his way to persuade Hogan and his men to stage an escape. Written by Harvey Bullock and R.S. Allen, "Klink's Escape" originally aired on March 27, 1970, as the final episode of Hogan's Heroes' fifth season. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Cuisine a la Stalag 13
    Hogan's Heroes entered its sixth season (meaning that the inmates of Stalag 13 were incarcerated approximately twice as long as any real American POW during WWII) with the episode titled "Cuisine a la Stalag 13." LeBeau's decision to escape may wreak havoc on the palates of both the prisoners and their captors: Even fat Sgt. Schultz, who has become accustomed to LeBeau's gourmet cooking, refuses to eat the gastronomic disasters served up by Sgt. Carter. But there is a more urgent need for LeBeau's services: Hogan needs to butter up a German general whose aid is an Allied agent. Kenneth Washington joins the cast as Sgt. Richard Baker, while the guest cast includes Brenda Benet as Marie Bizet. Written by Laurence Marks, "Cuisine a la Stalag 13" first aired on September 20, 1970. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: The Experts
    Noam Pitlik, who played a German double agent in the very first episode of Hogan's Heroes, is here cast as Capt. Karl Metzler, a German radio expert. In desperate need of Metzler's services, Hogan makes a foray into a nearby village to save the German officer from Gestapo assassins. Likewise making a return appearance to the series is Sabrina Scharf, this time in the role of Luisa. Written by Laurence Marks, "The Experts" originally aired on September 27, 1970. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Klink's Masterpiece
    Preying upon Klink's ego, Hogan convinces the Kommandant that he is a brilliant painter. Thus persuaded, Klink prepares a few "masterpieces" for a local art show. Actually, it is all part of Hogan's plans to relay top-secret German maps to three different underground units. Frequent Hogan's Heroes leading lady Victoria Carroll appears as Rhona. Written by Phil Sharp, "Klink's Masterpiece" first aired on October 4, 1970. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Lady Chitterly's Lover, Part One
    In the first episode of a two-part story, British traitor Sir Charles Chitterly parachutes into Stalag 13, carrying an important message for his close friend Adolf Hitler. By an amazing coincidence, Chitterly is the exact double for bumbling British POW Colonel Crittendon (understandably, since both roles are played by Bernard Fox). Kidnapping the real Chitterly, Hogan replaces him with Crittendon as part of a counterespionage plan -- which nearly ends before it begins when Lady Chitterly (Anne Rodgers) unexpectedly shows up in camp. Harold Gould rounds out the guest cast as General Von Schlomm. Written by Richard M. Powell, part one of "Lady Chitterly's Lover" originally aired on October 11, 1970. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Gowns By Yvette
    Hogan plans to use the wedding of General Burkhalter's chubby niece Frieda (Muriel Landers) as a rendezvous point with an Underground agent -- and as step one in an elaborate escape plan. Thus it is that Hogan's Gallic "hero" LeBeau impersonates an effete Parisian designer. Others in the cast include Dick Wilson ("Mr. Whipple" of TV commercial fame) as Count Von Hertzel, horror-film regular Bruno VeSoto as the Allied agent, and Bruce Kirby (father of actor Bruno Kirby) as a Gestapo man. Written by Laurence Marks, "Gowns by Yvette" first aired on January 30, 1970. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Lady Chitterly's Lover, Part Two
    In the conclusion of a two-part story, bungling British POW Col. Crittendon (Bernard Fox) is still impersonating his double, the traitorous Sir Charles Chitterly (also Bernard Fox). Though Hogan's plan to scuttle Chitterly's espionage mission receives the unexpected assistance of Sir Charles' wife (Anne Rodgers), he is still worried that Crittendon will not be able to fool Chitterly's bosom companion Adolf Hitler. Meanwhile, the real Sir Charles escapes from Hogan's barracks. Written by Richard M. Powell, part two of "Lady Chitterly's Lover" originally aired on October 18, 1970. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: The Gestapo Takeover
    Major Strauss (Joseph Ruskin) of the Gestapo takes charge of Stalag 13 and ships Klink and Schultz off to the Russian front. Hogan devises an elaborate masquerade, contingent upon Newkirk's gift for celebrity impressions. Bruce Kirby, the father of film star Bruno Kirby, appears as Otto Baum, while Martin Kosleck, who played Josef Goebbels in many an American propaganda film during WWII, is here cast as General Mueller. Written by Laurence Marks, "The Gestapo Takeover" first aired on October 25, 1970. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Kommandant Schultz
    Schultz becomes temporary Kommandant when Klink is called to active duty. Depending upon Schultz's ineptitude, Hogan works up a plan to smuggle an Underground courier and a cache of uranium out of Stalag 13. Unfortunately, Schultz's newfound power goes to his head (where there's plenty of room), and he morphs into a minor-league dictator. Written by Laurence Marks, "Kommandant Schultz" originally aired on November 1, 1970. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Eight O'Clock and All Is Well
    Monte Markham essays one of the first of his many "hidden villain" roles as Lt. James Martin, Stalag 13's newest POW. By sheerest luck, Hogan discovers that Lt. Martin is actually a top-ranking Gestapo spy. Alas, it may too late to do anything about it: Martin already has all the necessary information on Hogan's latest espionage assignment. Originally telecast on November 8, 1970, "Eight O'Clock and All is Well" was written by Laurence Marks. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: The Big Record
    Klink orders the prisoners to send home pre-written recorded messages. Hoping to turn the tables on his captors, Hogan plans to use the recording equipment to transcribe a top-secret SS meeting. The plan hinges on Schultz, who is convinced (by Hogan) that he has what it takes to be a major singing star. Jack Riley, who later played the neurotic Mr. Carlin on The Bob Newhart Show, is here cast as an SS Man. First shown on November 15, 1970, "The Big Record" was written by R.S. Allen and Harvey Bullock. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: It's Dynamite
    Hogan must determine the location of several bridges that have been booby-trapped by the Nazis. Failing that, he must hijack a truck loaded with dynamite -- which, thanks to an unusually resourceful Hochstetter, keeps vanishing from its predetermined route. The supporting cast includes Michael Fox as Berger and Lyn Peters as Elsa. Written by Laurence Marks, "It's Dynamite" made its first network appearance on November 22, 1970. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Operation Tiger
    Arlene Martel makes her final series appearance as Underground agent Louise Monet -- code name "Tiger." Having been captured by the Gestapo, Tiger is sentenced to be executed in Berlin. To rescue their curvaceous comrade in arms, Hogan and his crew must infiltrate -- and destroy -- a heavily guarded train. Even allowing for the fact that the villains are brutal Nazis who thoroughly deserve extermination, Hogan's callousness in disposing of them is quite startling for a situation comedy. Written by Laurence Marks, "Operation Tiger" first aired on November 29, 1970. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: How's the Weather?
    In order to direct Allied bombers to a German hydroelectric dam, Hogan is in dire need of current weather reports. In order to hear those reports via radio, Hogan throws an anniversary party for Klink. Fortunately, the cloddish Kommandant never looks too closely at those "party" balloons which hover prominently over Stalag 13. Written by R.S. Allen and Harvey Bullock, "How's the Weather?" originally aired on January 2, 1970. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: The Big Broadcast
    In order to evade German radio-detection units, Hogan plants a transmitter in Klink's car. Hoping to relay information about a Nazi rocket factory to the Underground, Hogan is unexpectedly stymied by Sgt. Schultz, who "borrows" the car to do a bit of black-market swapping. This episode was written by future All in the Family fixture Bill Davenport. "The Big Broadcast" was originally shown on December 6, 1970. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: The Gypsy
    This week, Hogan is assigned to smuggle an anti-radar device into London. The plan is contingent upon the superstitious nature of Col. Klink. To exploit that nature, Hogan's operative LeBeau claims that he has the ability to predict the future. As one prominent Hogan's Heroes fan has observed, it is amazing that LeBeau is suddenly able to find an earring -- and an attractive one at that. Written by Harvey Bullock and R.S. Allen, "The Gypsy" originally aired on December 13, 1970. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: The Dropouts
    Several of Hogan's men are caught in the act of espionage by some Gestapo agents. Even though the Germans inexplicably allow the men to slip through their fingers, Hogan prepares an all-out escape for himself and his crew. And then two of the "Gestapo" officers reveal themselves to be German scientists, hoping to defect to London. John Stephenson and Ben Wright are cast respectively as Professor Bauer and Dr. Reimann (Ben Wright), while ubiquitous Canadian character actor Gordon Pinsent is seen as SS Captain Steinr. Written by Laurence Marks, "The Dropouts" first aired on December 27, 1970. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Get Fit or Go Fight
    Intending to use the hubcaps in Klink's car to transmit information to the Underground, Hogan and his crew must figure out a way to convince Klink that he has to go to town immediately. The solution: Arrange things so that Klink must get back in top physical condition or be shipped off to the dreaded Russian front. The supporting cast includes Corinne Conley as Gerta and Michael Fox as Major Kimmel. Written by Bill Davenport, "Get Fit or Go Fight" was originally telecast on January 9, 1970. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Fat Hermann, Go Home
    Hogan again finds himself working with (and frequently against) redoubtable Russian spy Marya (Nita Talbot). This time, Hogan's mission is to ship stolen art back to London before the masterpieces can be added to Hermann Goering's private collection. The plan hinges on Marya's ability to convince Sgt. Schultz that he is Goering's exact double. Written by Richard M. Powell, "Fat Hermann, Go Home" made its first network appearance on January 16, 1970. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: The Softer They Fall
    In a comic re-enactment of the Joe Louis/Max Schmeling heavyweight bout, Kinchloe is pitted against Luftwaffe champ Bruno (Chuck Hicks) in a boxing match. Since Hogan needs to prolong the fight as a diversion for his latest espionage height, it is imperative that Kinch "goes the distance." Real-life boxing referee Frankie Van also appears in this episode, playing (what else?) a referee. First shown on January 23, 1970, "The Softer They Fall" was written by Laurence Marks. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: One Army at a Time
    Disguised as a German soldier for an underground mission, Sgt. Carter is caught by an enemy Panzer division. At the behest of Hogan, Carter continues his masquerade in order to recover a cache of confiscated dynamite before the real Germans can find the explosives. Dave Willock appears as an American captain, while Hogan's Heroes general-purpose actor Dave Morick is cast as a sergeant. Written by Laurence Marks, "One Army at a Time" originally aired on February 13, 1970. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Standing Room Only
    Major Strauss (Noam Pitlik) comes a-snooping at Stalag 13, suspicious about Klink's "perfect" no-escape record. Discovering that Klink has been -- er -- "borrowing" from the camp's treasury, Strauss orders that the Kommandant be turned over to the Gestapo. Hogan must save Klink so that he can carry out a mass escape plan. Written by Laurence Marks, "Standing Room Only" made its first network appearance on February 20, 1970. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Six Lessons From Madame LaGrange
    Marlyn Mason guest stars as Lily Frankel, a sexy German nightclub chanteuse who doubles as an Allied agent. Lily informs Hogan that one of the Underground members is actually a double agent who intends to turn over a list of Allied operatives to the Germans. To prevent this, Hogan cooks up a scheme that requires Col. Klink and Gestapo officer Hochstetter to take dancing lessons from LeBeau (it makes sense in context!). Written by Arthur Julian, "Six Lessons From Madame LaGrange" first aired on February 27, 1970. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: The Sergeant's Analyst
    Goofing off as usual, Sgt. Schultz is caught by General Burkhalter, who prepares to send the hapless sergeant to the Russian front. In order to keep from losing their favorite patsy -- who has been unwittingly smuggling Allied messages stuffed in loaves of pumpernickel -- Hogan and his crew concoct a plan to save Schultz from certain doom. The episode's highlight finds Newkirk donning female drag as a lady psychiatrist. Written by Bill Davenport, "The Sergeant's Analyst" originally aired on March 6, 1970. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: To Russia Without Love
    Duplicitous German officer Col. Becker (H.M. Wynant), hoping to trade assignments with Klink, tries to persuade the Kommandant that being transferred to the Russian front wouldn't be so bad. Learning of Becker's schemes, Hogan concocts a plan of his own whereby Klink will unwittingly appropriate some top-secret German documents. To cinch the deal, Hogan arranges a cozy tête-à-tête between Klink and sexy Soviet spy Olga (Ruta Lee). Written by Arthur Julian, "To Russia Without Love" first aired on January 31, 1971. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Klink for the Defense
    Klink's fellow officer Captain Hugo Hauptmann (Sandy Kenyon) is exposed as a traitor. Put on trial, Hauptmann finds that his life is in the hands of Klink, who has been chosen as counsel for the defense on the theory that he will bungle the job. It is up to Hogan to save both Hauptmann and Klink in order to steal a map of German submarine installations. First telecast on February 7, 1971, "Klink for the Defense" was written by Bill Davenport. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: The Kamikazes are Coming
    Hogan and his crew hope to redirect a German rocket to their contacts in England so that the missile can be examined and duplicated. Unfortunately, Hogan finds himself up against two dilemmas: How to get the rocket into Stalag 13 and how to deal with mercurial Russian spy Marya (Nita Talbot), who is now the wife of German rocket designer Dr. Otto von Borneman (Henry Corden). Like so many other episodes of Hogan's Heroes, this one was written by Richard M. Powell. "The Kamikazes Are Coming" first aired on February 21, 1971. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Kommandant Gertrude
    Kathleen Freeman returns as General Burkhalter's Wagnerian sister Gertrude. By virtue of her engagement to Major Wolfgang Karp (Lee Bergere), Gertrude has been placed in command of Stalag 13. This development puts a crimp in Hogan's plan to smuggle an American general into London -- but only temporarily. Leslie Parrish, best known for her portrayal of Daisy Mae in the 1959 film version of Li'l Abner, is here cast as Karen Richter. Written by Laurence Marks, "Kommandant Gertrude" originally aired on February 28, 1971. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: That's No Lady, That's My Spy
    Hogan intends to use a fundraising tea party, orchestrated by the wives of several German officers, as a cover to relay penicillin to an injured Underground agent. The scheme relies heavily upon Newkirk's ability to convincingly adopt female drag as a General's wife! Alice Ghostley, who previously made a one-shot appearance as General Burkhalter's sister Gertrude, is here cast as Mrs. Mannheim. Written by Arthur Julian, "That's No Lady, That's My Spy" was originally scheduled to air on January 3, 1971, but was moved back to January 24 due to a late-breaking news special. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Look at the Pretty Snowflakes
    Written by Arthur Julian, this episode finds Hogan and his crew trying to harness the forces of nature in order to create an avalanche. It is all part of a scheme to redirect a full-scale Panzer assault, which has been routed through the slippery slopes of Mount Hoffenstein. Harold J. Stone heads the guest cast as General Stromberger. Originally telecast on March 21, 1971, "Look at the Pretty Snowflakes" was the last episode of Hogan's Heroes to be filmed, though not the last one to be shown. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Rockets or Romance
    Marlyn Mason returns as leggy German chanteuse Lily Frankel, who moonlights as an Allied agent. With Lily's assistance, Hogan hopes to destroy a trio of mobile guided-missile launchers. The problem: How to evade a veritable minefield of German radio detectors. Written by Arthur Julian, "Rockets or Romance" originally aired April 4, 1971, as the 168th and final episode of Hogan's Heroes (though it was actually the 156th episode to be filmed). ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Easy Come, Easy Go
    Can it be that Hogan has gone to the other side? It sure seems that way when he agrees to accompany Klink on an underground mission to England to steal a revolutionary new American plane. In truth, however, Hogan merely pretends to go along with the scheme, the better to expose a Nazi spy ring operating in London. Cynthia Lynn, who played Klink's secretary Hilda in several first-season episodes, is here cast as Eva; also in the cast is a pre-Police Academy George Gaynes as the General. Written by Laurence Marks, "Easy Come, Easy Go" originally aired on January 10, 1971. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: The Meister Spy
    Hogan's Heroes utility player Dave Morick is spotlighted in this episode as a Nazi spy posing as an American officer named Lt. Miller. To dupe "Miller" into revealing the identity of his German contact, Hogan and his men stage an elaborate masquerade, transforming Klink's office into Nazi headquarters in Berlin and having Sgt. Carter give out with his legendary impersonation of Adolf Hitler. Oscar Beregi) appears as Herr Schneer. Written by R.S. Allen and Harvey Bullock, "The Meister Spy" first aired on January 17, 1971. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hogan's Heroes: Hogan's Double Life
    Hogan must discredit the testimony of Gestapo Major Pruhst (Malachi Throne), who has irrefutable photographic evidence of Hogan's sabotage operation. There is nothing else to do but convince the German high command that Hogan has an exact double -- a Nazi officer. Frequent series guest star John Hoyt appears as Field Marshal Von Leiter. Written by Phil Sharp, "Hogan's Double Life" was originally telecast on March 7, 1971. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

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